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I'm new here and to gluten-free in general. Brief history: After some reading and realizing family history, I decided to do testing through Enterolab. The results indicated elevated antigliadin (?), no damage or malabsorption. Gene test showed no celiac gene but double copies of gluten sensitive genes. My family history is: maternal grandmother - life threatening food allergies, mother - severe rheumatoid arthritis, cousin on mother's side - type 1 diabetes, sister - peripheral neuropathy, son - life threatening food allergies. My thinking on the allergies is maybe leaky gut caused by elevated zonulin?

Anyway, with all this in mind, I decided to commit to a gluten free lifestyle to head off any potential damage caused by the gluten. However, after one week, yes, I know, one week...I'm wondering if I am over-reacting. One side says that I should do what I can to prevent damage. The other side feels overwhelmed with trying to cook for my family and be able to afford it (mainly baking issues). I actually broke down in tears as I was trying to make pizza tonight. Silly...

Can you help me resolve this back and forth thinking in my head? I know this is nothing in comparison with what celiacs deal with. I just have read that gluten sensitivity can be damaging in other ways. Thanks!

Blessings,

Jamie

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Why don't you commit to giving it a solid try for a month. Then try some gluten. If you have a reaction you'll know that staying gluten-free is the best choice for your health.

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Can you help me resolve this back and forth thinking in my head? I know this is nothing in comparison with what celiacs deal with. I just have read that gluten sensitivity can be damaging in other ways. Thanks!

Blessings,

Jamie

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Pizza is easy! http://www.genaw.com/lowcarb/deep_dish_pizza.html

For baking sweets, I use either coconut flour, or almond flour. For the almond flour, instead of spending $10 on 1 lb on Bob's Red mill, I buy a bag of blanched almonds and then grind them in the coffee grinder myself. Cost is about $3.50. Coconut flour is $10 for 2 pounds on (Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned)

Think outside the food box.

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Pizza is easy! http://www.genaw.com/lowcarb/deep_dish_pizza.html

For baking sweets, I use either coconut flour, or almond flour. For the almond flour, instead of spending $10 on 1 lb on Bob's Red mill, I buy a bag of blanched almonds and then grind them in the coffee grinder myself. Cost is about $3.50. Coconut flour is $10 for 2 pounds on (Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned)

Think outside the food box.

OH REBA32!!!!!!

That recipe sounds superfrickindelicious! And all this time I thought CRUST meant flour! You are a Godsend!

I'm gonna try that one for SuperBowl tomorrow!

Who's your money on?

I got 3 squares picked at work....so I don't care who wins! just as long as my squares pay off! 50 bucks per quarter would be a nice membership to Curves!

tytytytytytytyty

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I'm new here and to gluten-free in general. Brief history: After some reading and realizing family history, I decided to do testing through Enterolab. The results indicated elevated antigliadin (?), no damage or malabsorption. Gene test showed no celiac gene but double copies of gluten sensitive genes. My family history is: maternal grandmother - life threatening food allergies, mother - severe rheumatoid arthritis, cousin on mother's side - type 1 diabetes, sister - peripheral neuropathy, son - life threatening food allergies. My thinking on the allergies is maybe leaky gut caused by elevated zonulin?

Anyway, with all this in mind, I decided to commit to a gluten free lifestyle to head off any potential damage caused by the gluten. However, after one week, yes, I know, one week...I'm wondering if I am over-reacting. One side says that I should do what I can to prevent damage. The other side feels overwhelmed with trying to cook for my family and be able to afford it (mainly baking issues). I actually broke down in tears as I was trying to make pizza tonight. Silly...

Can you help me resolve this back and forth thinking in my head? I know this is nothing in comparison with what celiacs deal with. I just have read that gluten sensitivity can be damaging in other ways. Thanks!

Blessings,

Jamie

Jamie,

Gluten-intolerance can become just as damaging as full-blown Celiac in many ways. Also, many highly-sensitive gluten-intolerant folks experience stronger symptoms than some with Celiac, so please know that the problems you are facing are just as strong and just as real.

I have highly sensitive gluten-intolerance, so I know from personal experience what a blow a body can take with it.

Take a look at my symptoms in my signature line, below. Even though my villi aren't damaged and even through my DQ 2 and DQ8 do not indicate the Celiac gene, the diarrhea from my elevated gliadin level became so severe that, over time, I wasn't absorbing nutrients -- and malabsorbtion can lead to more serious issues regardless of if it comes from damaged villi or from a person's body rejecting food because it reads it as poison.

If I had stopped eating gluten earlier (if only I had known I needed to stop!), I would have saved myself from years of HORRIBLE pain, sickness, neurological damage, confusion and frustration.

I'd keep with it -- hang in there. It really does get easier over time. In the meantime, come here and scream your lungs out! That's what I did! I acted like a real baby at times. It was great to have a place to vent.

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Yes, it's worth it. But a week - a week is nothing in the grand scheme of your life. You're learning an entirely new lifestyle, an entirely new (and seemingly contradictory to our culture) habit. This is something that will take many weeks, maybe many months. Don't let that scare you off - it's a big adjustment, but it's an adjustment of practice, and you CAN do it. Most kids don't learn to walk over night, and this is a similar thing - you have to learn how to do it.

Honestly, I don't eat a whole lot of baked goods, or other gluten substitutes these days. Get creative and find more interesting things to do with all the naturally gluten free, whole foods around you, and it's not only easier and less time consuming (well, for me), but it's also cheaper. That too is a change in how one eats, though, and takes time and patience.

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Thank you so much for the encouragement! It's good to know that what I am feeling is normal - about moments of denial and being overwhelmed. I think some of it stems from the fact that I don't have those commonly linked symptoms, at least I don't think I do. I may find out differently the longer I am gluten-free. I AM thankful, though, to have this info before incurring damage.

In my mind, I DO know that I need to take this seriously. I mean, watching my mother suffer with RA all these years, I would say it is just as debilitating as celiac. So, if I can prevent that or something like it, I'm willing. It just seems that most of the info online is geared toward celiac disease, so I'm not sure what info to skip. Or does most of it apply anyway?

I will definitely try the pizza recipe! The recipe I have been using is just so wet and sticky! Is it supposed to be that way?

One caveat is that I have one son with nut allergies, so that excludes Bob's Red Mills flours, which are the most accessible around here. I am sourcing other flours, though, and seeing which ones I can get without too much shipping.

Anyway, thanks again for the support! It's nice to know I can come here where others understand!

Blessings,

Jamie

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Hi, Jamie:

A lot of folks think that gluten-intolerance is just a little thing compared to celiac, or they may think that celiac is something separate from gluten-intolerance, but it is not. Celiac disease is a form of gluten-intolerance. Celiac IS gluten-intolerance (but gluten-intolerance isn't always celiac disease).

As stated in the book Healthier Without Wheat, by Dr. Stephen Wangen:

"Gluten intolerance can be divided into two general categories: Celiac and Non-Celiac . . . Celiac disease itself is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gluten intolerance." He also says, "As difficult as it sometimes is to find a physician who is well versed in celiac disease . . . it is even more difficult to find a doctor who is aware that patients can have a gluten intolerance but not have celiac disease."

When I was first tested for celiac and it came back negative, my former doctor told me that I didn't have celiac, so I didn't have to worry about eating gluten!

WRONG! Sadly, he didn't know how important it was to also look at my gliadin level.

Thank goodness, I found a doctor at the University of Chicago Celiac Center who understands.

Healthier Without Wheat is a really good book to read if you are non-celiac gluten intolerant.

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Healthier Without Wheat is a really good book to read if you are non-celiac gluten intolerant.

Yay! My library has this! Thanks for the recommendation!

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I am technically gluten intolerant, not celiac, and have had a remarkable lessening of many arthritis and neurological symptoms since going gluten free about 7 years ago.

I wish somebody had been able to figure this out earlier for me, (and the last neuro = idiot who told me I did NOT have a food problem, when I kept telling her I had done an elimination diet carefully and proved to myself that I did, plus she lied about some test results ) but at least I'm not in a wheelchair, able to still participate in outdoors activities, and I can eat a lot of other yummy food now that I couldn't before, and I can still do a lot of other activities.

I don't know if you have any symptoms and don't realize it yet, but be thankful for the lack of damage.

Homemade pizza crust is designed to drive us crazy.

My spouse just takes a big ol' rice gluten-free tortilla and crisps the thing in the oven first, then tops it and there is a super thin crust pizza.

I will mix up something that tastes pretty good, but I still can't get the texture just so because I don't have a commercial oven. Oh well. Hint. Most gluten free pizza dough recipes I have come across don't actually work exactly as written. I have a baking knack so I can improvise, but a lot of times I read thru them going What Was This Person Thinking. ? Because I'm good at following a recipe exactly as written in terms of measurement, and the resulting pampered dough will be sitting there, sullen, unresponsive, and daring me to attempt to get it to perform. If it fails the second time, I start fiddling with it, adding either more liquid, more gluten-free flour, and frequently, skipping the yeast except as flavoring, and just going with a baking soda and vinegar rise. And these doughs, or pre made purchased crusts, need to be somewhat pre cooked or pre broiled before the toppings are added, or they are soggy.

I baked with yeast and wheat for years and made all my own bread and cakes, so scratch cooking doesn't intimidate me, I know about temperatures and about how yeast doesn't like certain things, and I'm not wild about mixes.

So don't feel bad about tapioca frisbees.

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I am technically gluten intolerant, not celiac, and have had a remarkable lessening of many arthritis and neurological symptoms since going gluten free about 7 years ago.

I wish somebody had been able to figure this out earlier for me, (and the last neuro = idiot who told me I did NOT have a food problem, when I kept telling her I had done an elimination diet carefully and proved to myself that I did, plus she lied about some test results ) but at least I'm not in a wheelchair, able to still participate in outdoors activities, and I can eat a lot of other yummy food now that I couldn't before, and I can still do a lot of other activities.

I don't know if you have any symptoms and don't realize it yet, but be thankful for the lack of damage.

Like you, I still can't believe how much better I feel now. I was sinking and in horrible, HORRIBLE pain to the point of barely being able to walk, plus countless neurological issues. I have little doubt that if I hadn't finally received a correct diagnosis, I might have been told I had MS. No one could figure out what the heck was the matter with me.

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Update on that pizza recipe ............

OMG it's fantastic!

cream cheese/eggs/parmesan/mozarella and italian seasoning for the crust.

It's an amazing tasting pizza!

tytytytytytytyty!

I will never miss pizza again!

Now.....can anybody do something about hamburger buns...........

Everyone that hasn't tried that recipe - d-d-definately needs to try it!

Hats off to the one who came up with THAT one!

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Update on that pizza recipe ............

OMG it's fantastic!

cream cheese/eggs/parmesan/mozarella and italian seasoning for the crust.

It's an amazing tasting pizza!

tytytytytytytyty!

I will never miss pizza again!

Now.....can anybody do something about hamburger buns...........

Everyone that hasn't tried that recipe - d-d-definately needs to try it!

Hats off to the one who came up with THAT one!

I can't wait to try it!

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The website that has the pizza recipe is a wonderful woman who collects all of those. She's a low carb-er, so a lot of the recipes on the site are grain free.

I got a lot of recipes from the Atkins website too. The first phases are all grain free, so naturally gluten free.

Here's a good hamburger bun. I quite like a nice bacon and tomato sammich with these. They can be messy, but they're yummy. It's "eggy" to some tastebuds, but I like 'em! :-)

IMPROVED REVOLUTION ROLLS

4 egg whites

1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

3 egg yolks

1 teaspoon granular Splenda or equivalent liquid Splenda

Pinch salt

3 ounces cream cheese, softened

Beat the egg whites and cream of tartar until stiff. In another bowl, beat the egg yolks, Splenda, salt and cream cheese with a mixer until smooth. Gradually fold the yolk mixture into the egg whites being careful not to deflate the whites. Spray a baking sheet or muffin top pan with cooking spray. Divide the mixture into 6 mounds then flatten them slightly. Bake at 300

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The website that has the pizza recipe is a wonderful woman who collects all of those. She's a low carb-er, so a lot of the recipes on the site are grain free.

I got a lot of recipes from the Atkins website too. The first phases are all grain free, so naturally gluten free.

Here's a good hamburger bun. I quite like a nice bacon and tomato sammich with these. They can be messy, but they're yummy. It's "eggy" to some tastebuds, but I like 'em! :-)

IMPROVED REVOLUTION ROLLS

4 egg whites

1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

3 egg yolks

1 teaspoon granular Splenda or equivalent liquid Splenda

Pinch salt

3 ounces cream cheese, softened

Beat the egg whites and cream of tartar until stiff. In another bowl, beat the egg yolks, Splenda, salt and cream cheese with a mixer until smooth. Gradually fold the yolk mixture into the egg whites being careful not to deflate the whites. Spray a baking sheet or muffin top pan with cooking spray. Divide the mixture into 6 mounds then flatten them slightly. Bake at 300

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The website that has the pizza recipe is a wonderful woman who collects all of those. She's a low carb-er, so a lot of the recipes on the site are grain free.

I got a lot of recipes from the Atkins website too. The first phases are all grain free, so naturally gluten free.

Here's a good hamburger bun. I quite like a nice bacon and tomato sammich with these. They can be messy, but they're yummy. It's "eggy" to some tastebuds, but I like 'em! :-)

IMPROVED REVOLUTION ROLLS

4 egg whites

1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

3 egg yolks

1 teaspoon granular Splenda or equivalent liquid Splenda

Pinch salt

3 ounces cream cheese, softened

Beat the egg whites and cream of tartar until stiff. In another bowl, beat the egg yolks, Splenda, salt and cream cheese with a mixer until smooth. Gradually fold the yolk mixture into the egg whites being careful not to deflate the whites. Spray a baking sheet or muffin top pan with cooking spray. Divide the mixture into 6 mounds then flatten them slightly. Bake at 300

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