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daniknik

Entero Lab Results: How Do I Classify My Genes?

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Hi Folks-

I received my Entero Lab results today (after 3 months on a gluten free diet) and they confirmed what I thought was true even though my initial blood tests for Celiac (twice!) were all negative. My grandfather was a diagnosed celiac and I have had the laundry list of symptoms for almost my entire life. I am also sensitive to Soy and Egg via IgG blood testing and Yeast, and Nightshades via elimination diet. At least I don't have to try to reintroduce wheat "just to check" now...I was truly panicking at the thought!

Here's the questions: Can I call myself Celiac with these results and the dramatic improvements I've seen on the gluten-free diet? Also, I've noticed that some people identify themselves by their DQ..# how do I identify what mine are from these results? Which one is the Celiac gene and which one is the gluten sensitivity gene?

Thanks so much!

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 19 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 18 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 20 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0302

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0609

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,6)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

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You you can say you are celiac. Your genes are DQ8 and DQ6, the DQ8 is the 'celiac' gene.

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http://www.celiac.com/articles/21567/1/Ten-Facts-About-Celiac-Disease-Genetic-Testing/Page1.html

Enterolab only test for the beta subunit portions and therefore their test can miss part of a minor alpha subunit that carries a risk of Celiac disease

Gene testing can not tell you if you have Celiac, it can only indicate a 30% increased risk or developing Celiac Disease. Seventy percent of the people with the DQ2/DQ8 genes, do not develop Celiac.

But, it can be a piece of the puzzle.

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http://www.celiac.com/articles/21567/1/Ten-Facts-About-Celiac-Disease-Genetic-Testing/Page1.html

Enterolab only test for the beta subunit portions and therefore their test can miss part of a minor alpha subunit that carries a risk of Celiac disease

Gene testing can not tell you if you have Celiac, it can only indicate a 30% increased risk or developing Celiac Disease. Seventy percent of the people with the DQ2/DQ8 genes, do not develop Celiac.

But, it can be a piece of the puzzle.

Thanks for the link. I read the article and it seems to spend more time discussing people who receive negative genetic tests. I tested positive for one Celiac gene and one gluten sensitivity gene. I am female, I have had symptoms for almost my entire life, my grandfather was a diagnosed Celiac, and I inherited the gene from my father. I will be seeing my doctor in a couple of weeks, but I am confident that this is the correct diagnosis, especially considering the rapid improvement I experienced after eliminating gluten from my diet.

Again, thanks so much!

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You you can say you are celiac. Your genes are DQ8 and DQ6, the DQ8 is the 'celiac' gene.

Thanks! I appreciate the support!

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My genetics were a huge piece of the puzzle for me. My doctor was willing to use that along with my dietary response for a diagnosis. He wanted me to eat gluten for a month, but I just couldn't do it. So, be prepared for that if you are already gluten free. What is working for you, though, is that you have a first degree relative already diagnosed. I'm the first in my family to be diagnosed; although I do not believe I'm the only one.

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