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JeepMom

Family Going Gluten Free

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Well, here we are. I'm a wife & mom. We believe that my husband has celiac. He has way too many symptoms to ignore them. We are just waiting on the blood test to come back. (We should know on Monday). Even if the test were to come back neg, we're still going to try gluten free to see if it helps him.

We have 2 kids, they are 5 & 7, both girls.

The whole house is going gluten free because I do the cooking and I would rather just make one meal.

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I'm glad you are going to a gluten free kitchen. You may find it helps you and the children also.

I have to laugh when I hear people say having gluten in their kitchen doesn't bother them. I was one of those people who didn't know what a difference a gluten free kitchen would make on my health. Once my kitchen was gluten free it did make a difference. Would never have believed it.

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Good choice! It's not for everyone, but we find having virtually everything gluten free works well for us.

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That's great that you're being supportive. Though I'm sure most of it has to do with managing your time! I'm a wife and mom too. :) I wish my husband would leave the gluten out (he's the only one of us five that has it).

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After I went gluten free, my husband and son have as well. Not that they necessarily need to, but it sure makes it a lot easier cooking and cleaning. Not a trace of gluten in the house keep us from being anxious about me getting sick. My husband has lost some weight since we've switched over and we'd never turn back.

Kudos to you!

Janie

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I have to laugh when I hear people say having gluten in their kitchen doesn't bother them. I was one of those people who didn't know what a difference a gluten free kitchen would make on my health. Once my kitchen was gluten free it did make a difference. Would never have believed it.

My kitchen is not gluten free but it's just my husband and myself....no kids. I am as healthy as anyone with a totally gluten-free kitchen. Many, many people do this with total success....it all depends on your situation.

There is way too much fear in the world today and a newly diagnosed Celiac should not fear maintaining a mixed household. If you pay attention, it will work and there will be no cross contamination. It's a little more work but can be managed. I am not so sure I would do this if I had young kids but then again, kids are not stupid and can be taught anything. It's getting them to remember that's the hard part. :P

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Hi Jeepmom! Our home is probably going to go this route as well. I just don't know how it will work with my daughter (10) who is also fructose intolerant as some of the foods would cross...

I swear my DH has this as well. He is lactose intolerant but has begun having major bowel issues and even had a colonoscopy last year. His sisters removed glutten and had a world of difference so it won't hurt the fam doing this.

I think the hardest part will be coming up with fantabulous recipes to replace the others!

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Welcome to the board. We are mostly gluten-free - the only gluten in the kitchen is one loaf of bread squirreled away in the freezer, which is for me if we have sandwiches. We are very careful about cross contamination when do have sandwiches. I'm not celiac, husband is.

You will find a lot of information and answers to your questions here. Everyone is so supportive and helpful.

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We went totally gluten-free at first. But then my husband began complaining. Eventually I did buy him some things. Prepared sandwiches, cereal, crackers and cookies. He eats these in a different part of the house on paper plates.

And now I too have some gluten. I buy bread and use a separate toaster. Don't do that too often any more. I also have pretzels and cereal. I too eat these things in a different part of the house.

But as for cooking and baking? Certainly all gluten-free. I won't even bring wheat flour into the house.

My mom asked me about this the other day and couldn't understand why I would be eating gluten-free if I didn't have to. I already feel I am cooking a lot of separate meals simply because daughter likes chicken and I like beef. No way was I going to add gluten into the mix if I didn't have to. Besides... I have an egg allergy and feel that regular pasta is unsafe for me. So rice pasta it is!

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I am pretty lazy, so I didn't think twice about going gluten-free when DH needed to. And I am really glad I did because I got rid of my migraines! Biggest and best surprise of my life.

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When my fiancee went gluten free, I took almost all of the gluteny food to the neighbors and went and bought new groceries. The only things now in the house that aren't gluten free are tortillas (for my turkey wraps), barbecue sauce (that only goes on my plate if we have something like roast), and occasionally a salad dressing (that I use to dip vegetables in at work). Other than that, it seemed easier for the both of us to get rid of everything. I don't like extra work, and I don't like her being sick, so it made sense to do it this way. The only thing I really miss is good sandwich bread that doesn't require toasting to eat, but I got her a bread maker and baking books. We haven't found the perfect recipe yet, but we won't give up trying.

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A gluten free kitchen is WAY easier, IMO, especially when cooking for a whole family. My daughter and husband are Celiac so it's a lot nicer for them to know that anything in the house is "safe." In a world full of places they can't eat, they can eat anything in their own home and don't have to worry about it. The kids will adapt as long as they know it's what will help daddy feel better and stay healthy.

A couple tips for keeping a gluten free kitchen:

1. Replace your toaster.

2. Clean pots and pans very, very well. Sometimes gluten sticks in the scratches, etc. I didn't replace mine, but spent a whole day cleaning every crevice.

3. Replace wooden spoons.

4. Clean out utensil drawers and utensils. Sometimes crumbs get in the dividers and stuff, causing a risk for contamination.

It is overwhelming at first, but once your house of free of gluten, it is very easy to maintain. Good luck to you and your family on your gluten-free journey. :-)

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It is nice to read all of your comments. You all are giving me the courage to make our house gluten free as well. I have Celiac Disease and am frequently getting sick from cross-contamination. My husband wants to make the house gluten free but I didn't feel it would be fair for my family to be denied "good" food because of me. It seems gluten free food may be better for everyone. I think we can do this.

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I want a gluten free kitchen, but dh won't go for it. I can feed the kids gluten free food all day and they don't mind. Just hubby. He definately got more serious again since recently I was diagnosed with a stomach ulcer and with my AGA IgG still being positive.

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My 11year daughter was diagnosed with Celiac yesterday. Not sure where to start. Open to any ideas.

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Our house went gluten free for our second child when she was 14 months old. At the time, I did it because it was just easier since her older sister was so young too (2 1/2 years old at the time). No one else in our family had *any* suspicions of any gluten intolerance and/or allergy when we made the decision to have a gluten free house for our one child. Four years later, I am forever grateful that we went gluten free when we did.

Shockingly, through the elimination diet of running a gluten free house and living gluten free for our one child, we have come to recognize that myself and her older sister are also very gluten sensitive. Our 2 1/2 year old little boy also shows plenty of symptoms with trace gluten exposure, and we have no plans for any deliberate gluten introduction for him at this time.

I really feel (when I haven't been "glutened") that going gluten free is one of the best things that ever happened to me. And I am so grateful that I got to make the transition long before I was in medical crisis. In hindsight, I cannot believe that NOBODY ever suggested that I be checked for celiac . . . but that seems so typical of "healthcare" today!

So, while I initially did it for my daughter, as a now experiencing it myself super sensitive - there is no way that I would want to try a shared kitchen/home if there was any way around it. I need a safe place to recover, rest and heal that is truly gluten free. I want there to be one place where I don't have to ask myself a million questions before I take a bite to eat. And, I want one place where I don't have to ask myself a million questions before every bite my kids take too! And my gluten free kitchen is an amazing place to eat and be fed. There are *plenty* of other places for gluten eaters to get their "fix".

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I want a gluten free kitchen, but dh won't go for it. I can feed the kids gluten free food all day and they don't mind. Just hubby. He definately got more serious again since recently I was diagnosed with a stomach ulcer and with my AGA IgG still being positive.

Hello

It is very difficult to do. I purged all the gluten-filled foods from the Kitchen and donated them to the local food pantry. I washed all the utensils and mixing bowls - I took all the bowls and utensils and ran them all through the dishwasher, and then wiped down the cabinets and toaster and toaster oven.

I bought lots of gluten-free foods and restocked the pantry.

Then I knew the kitchen was safe and everything in it was safe. Then I had to closely monitor what was brought in. When guests ask what they can bring - I assign them a fruit salad, or vegetable salad- no croutons. Or have them bring the soda, or wine.

MGMG

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My 11year daughter was diagnosed with Celiac yesterday. Not sure where to start. Open to any ideas.

best place to start is http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ to learn about celiac also just google the term and see what you come across. The gluten-free community is very inviting and there are lots of resources out there...good luck!

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Welcome to the board. Husband was diagnosed in October of 2009. He is also Type I diabetic. My kitchen is 99% gluten-free. I have some regular bread and some frozen meals squirreled away in the freezer for myself, but most of the time I eat what he eats, especially on weekends.

It's funny, but when our daughter came home for a visit, she found some leftover gluten-free spaghetti in the fridge. When we realized she was eating it, we told her about the noodles being gluten-free. She laughed and said, "This tastes great! Better than that whole-wheat CR*P you've been serving before!"

It is quite a lifestyle change, but you will find, once you have some time to adjust to it, everyone will start feeling better. We've been lucky, our families have been hugely supportive.

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I have found that Google is one of my very best resources. Say I want to make gluten free Mongolian Beef, I just Google it and BAM I get links to recipes. Sometimes it is a bit of trial an error by taking a regular muffin recipe you see in Better Homes and replacing the gluten ingredients with gluten-free ingredients. Eventually by looking at enough recipes you will start to get an idea of which ingredients you can substitute for what. My household is gluten-free (at least at home) and I make it a point to try to make gluten free versions of normal food. My niece recently stayed with us and actually liked our homemade gluten free chocolate chip cookies better than regular ones.

Sorry I think i got a little off topic! But yes I made our kitchen gluten-free because 1) it is easier and 2) my 2 year old is still too young to quite understand. It is nice to have a completely safe zone for my son where no one has to worry about giving him something unsafe.

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I've been gluten free since 1990. My kids and husband are not. However, if I made things like stew, soup or meatloaf etc. they were made gluten free and they didn't know the difference. If I made pasta I just made mine seperate. No big deal. The boys were great at halloween, they would bring back their trick or treat bags and they would read the labels on the candy and give me a few of what I could have :-) They had their bread and I had mine for sandwiches. It's only a big deal if you make it a big deal. We would go on ski trips and at lunch I would get the bacon cheeseburger (hold the bun). Then South Beach Diet and low carb craze came around and everyone was doing it :-)

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You will so enjoy a gluten free house. I did not think it would take such a difference. It was nice to be so wrong. You may see positive changes in your family.

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Hi there my name is Amy and I am new to this site. My son Jeffrey was just diagnosed with Celiac Disease and its been hard on him. I purchased a book about Celiac Disease and in the book it said if you have small children that have been diagnosed then its good for the whole family to start eating Gluten Free so your child doesn't feel left out. My husband said it will be good for the family to go Gluten Free. I know it will be good because I am very positive that I have Celiac Disease. I was originally diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and then after that IBS my mom has Chrons Disease and my little sister has been having stomach problems so I told her that our family is getting tested so she should to. Not sure if she is but I think she should this way put her mind at ease.

Trying to find new receipes and doing alot of research on Celiac Disease. Anything anyone has for me would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Amy

Well, here we are. I'm a wife & mom. We believe that my husband has celiac. He has way too many symptoms to ignore them. We are just waiting on the blood test to come back. (We should know on Monday). Even if the test were to come back neg, we're still going to try gluten free to see if it helps him.

We have 2 kids, they are 5 & 7, both girls.

The whole house is going gluten free because I do the cooking and I would rather just make one meal.

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