Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up
0
Evangeline

Enterolab - Gluten Stool Test - Were Your Results Accurate?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

If you used EnteroLab for the gluten-sensitivity stool test, were you satisfied with the results?

Did the results ever say negative when you knew you had Celiac Disease or gluten-sensitivity?

I plan on doing this test. I've already had a blood test and it was negative. I heard that a stool test is more sensitive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm new to all of these, but my results say I have some fairly extensive malabsorption, which I believe to be true. But all the other tests were negative, so it makes it more confusing to me, is there another reason for it? Is it leaky gut?

I'm still trying to figure out my genes and what it means (see my post further down, if anyone can add to Nora's posts, I would greatly appreciate it)...It looks like I'm a 7 and 5, but then it seems that I'm also a 3 and 1, not sure if I understand that or what the implications are.

I want to get my kids tested, I have one who tested posted on a skin test to wheat (IGE) so it would be interesting to see how that corresponds to the genes.

I've been doing searches over the last week (with all the snow, I'm not doing much else) but find it hard to search for the specific genes, the engine says I can't search like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you used EnteroLab for the gluten-sensitivity stool test, were you satisfied with the results?

Did the results ever say negative when you knew you had Celiac Disease or gluten-sensitivity?

I plan on doing this test. I've already had a blood test and it was negative. I heard that a stool test is more sensitive.

Yes, I was satisfied with the enterolab results even though I had tested negative by blood test. This is the first time I had used enterolab, so no I had never gotten a negative result from them. Yes, I have heard that the stool test is much more sensitive and accurate than the blood test that is why I did it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I have heard that the stool test is much more sensitive and accurate than the blood test that is why I did it.

Please note that Enterolabs can not and does not diagnose for Celiac Disease. Stool testing, at this time is not an accepted form of diagnosis regarding Celiac. They can test for gluten sensitivity, but then most, already suspect a gluten/food sensitivity in contacting Enterolabs.

Here is some additional information on Genetic Testing for Celiac Disease:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21567/1/Ten-Facts-About-Celiac-Disease-Genetic-Testing/Page1.html

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please note that Enterolabs can not and does not diagnose for Celiac Disease. Stool testing, at this time is not an accepted form of diagnosis regarding Celiac. They can test for gluten sensitivity, but then most, already suspect a gluten/food sensitivity in contacting Enterolabs.

Here is some additional information on Genetic Testing for Celiac Disease:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21567/1/Ten-Facts-About-Celiac-Disease-Genetic-Testing/Page1.html

Hmm, then what is an accepted form to diagnose Celiac Disease/gluten-sensitivity? I already had two negative blood tests. I've read the biopsy gives negative results for people with severe Celiac Disease. Is the genetic test the best way to assume one has Celiac Disease?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, then what is an accepted form to diagnose Celiac Disease/gluten-sensitivity? I already had two negative blood tests. I've read the biopsy gives negative results for people with severe Celiac Disease. Is the genetic test the best way to assume one has Celiac Disease?

Unfortunately, there is no perfect method of diagnosis. Serologic Blood Panel, Endoscopy/Biopsy, in combination with a positive dietary response, can be diagnostic.

Many times, these methods fail to pinpoint a severe sensitivity, and some turn to Enterolabs. A gene test will not tell you that you have Celiac, but it can indicate and increased risk of developing Celiac. I believe, it's 70% of the people with the Dq2 Dq8 genes will never develop Celiac. It can also tell you that you genetically cannot develop the autoimmune Celiac Disease if you do not carry the specific genes. So again, gene testing can only be a piece of the puzzle.

Many people here are self diagnosed and found that compliance with the diet is good enough for them. I can empathize with the quest for answers, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter tested positive with an 11 through Enterolab but she has not had any improvement in the 4 months that she has been off of gluten. Her only symptom has been severe insomnia. She has never had GI symptoms I'm really starting to question whether or not she is truly sensitive to gluten. Is there another way that we can find out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's a hard situation....if you aren't experiencing symptoms, then how do you know if it's gluten? We are facing the same issues, we don't have the classical symptoms. I have tried convincing the kids to go gluten free, we tried it for about 30 days and no one thought it make a difference for them. Now, long term, it might reduce lots of things, but then again, it might now...so without a positive biopsy or blood work, how do you know? Enterolabs seems to think that all the genes can cause sensitivity or intolerance except DQ4, so I am not sure that's a help at all....

Unless it comes back DQ2 and 8, it seems that it's hit or miss...then what to do? If it can take 1=2 years to see improvement for some symptoms, that's an awfully long time to be on a restrictive diet with no answers. And there are so many other things that could be contributing like corn, dairy, food colorings, MSG, how does one differentiate?

I was hoping to be able to search these boards and get more definitive answers from people who have my gene types, but I am learning that it doesn't seem to matter so much what gene types you have, but whether you improve on the diet. And trying to manage 5 kids and myself on a gluten free diet for two years is going to be so stressful, I'm not sure I want to try that without more definitive proof.

I'm still confused about my particular gene types and haven't been able to really get straightforward, easy to understand answers in the literature, much work needs to be done there....

I considered testing all the kids, but the cost is ridiculous and may not tell us anything new....the blood work has been all negative and one daughter had a biopsy that was negative...so I'm not sure what to think...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's a hard situation....if you aren't experiencing symptoms, then how do you know if it's gluten? We are facing the same issues, we don't have the classical symptoms. I have tried convincing the kids to go gluten free, we tried it for about 30 days and no one thought it make a difference for them. Now, long term, it might reduce lots of things, but then again, it might now...so without a positive biopsy or blood work, how do you know? Enterolabs seems to think that all the genes can cause sensitivity or intolerance except DQ4, so I am not sure that's a help at all....

Unless it comes back DQ2 and 8, it seems that it's hit or miss...then what to do? If it can take 1=2 years to see improvement for some symptoms, that's an awfully long time to be on a restrictive diet with no answers. And there are so many other things that could be contributing like corn, dairy, food colorings, MSG, how does one differentiate?

I was hoping to be able to search these boards and get more definitive answers from people who have my gene types, but I am learning that it doesn't seem to matter so much what gene types you have, but whether you improve on the diet. And trying to manage 5 kids and myself on a gluten free diet for two years is going to be so stressful, I'm not sure I want to try that without more definitive proof.

I'm still confused about my particular gene types and haven't been able to really get straightforward, easy to understand answers in the literature, much work needs to be done there....

I considered testing all the kids, but the cost is ridiculous and may not tell us anything new....the blood work has been all negative and one daughter had a biopsy that was negative...so I'm not sure what to think...

I don't know the age of your children, but I would be willing to bet that you can cook daily meals totally gluten free, and no one would know the difference. If you need assistance doing that, the Baking, Recipe Thread has many suggestions.

Most meals can be cooked gluten free, and a substitution needs to be made for bread and pasta. I really is pretty easy, once you get the hang of it.

Your gene testing cannot tell you if you have Celiac. It can only tell you that you might be an increased risk...that's all.

Sometimes the diet is an epiphany to some. If it works, you know there is an issue of some level. If it does not work, there are places that can test for food sensitivities. Tackle one issue at a time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions....I made up a weeks worth of menus tonight, that wasn't too difficult. But the problem is that all but one are school age, so I need to have total support and cooperation on their parts because they have school lunches, treats at school, birthday parties, sleepovers, boy scout activities, etc. And all of these events have gluten. I came up with a list of breakfasts, treats, snacks, etc. that are gluten free for the house, but it's all for nothing if they disregard the diet outside the home.

I am afraid that I'll go to the expense and trouble to make our house gluten free only to have them eating gluten on almost a daily basis outside the home.

That's why I'm searching for some answers about my gene test results, Nora was able to help me, but I still have questions and I'm not sure if there just aren't any answers...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

  • Upcoming Events

    • February 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
×