Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up
0
Lynayah

Are The Sticky Labels On Fruit Gluten-Free?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Something just hit me . . . are the sticky labels on fresh fruit gluten free? I always wash my fruit, but perhaps I should be cutting off the area that has the sticker?

Anyone know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something that happened today: As I was opening a package of gluten-free Canadian bacon, I had to peel off tons of sticky tape, not to mention the glue that held the top of the package together -- is it gluten-free? Had I not been careful, I could have easily cc'd the meat if it is not.

And what about the sticky peel-off-thingy that's on the aseptic container that holds my gluten-free broth?

Or the glue that holds the foil to the back of my sinus pills?

Or the glue that holds the foil to the top of the Smucker's honey, in the little single-serving packets? (My husband had called the company to ask about this once, and they said "Oh, it should be fine." But they weren't sure.

Or the sticky part of a Sticky Note? Is it full of gluten, the same as a stamp or an envelope (I imagine this one is a resounding yes -- I'm really more concerned about the food stuff).

Okay, so please tell me . . . am I just being paranoid here, or do I have to worry about these gummy-gluey-sticky things that are on food/drugs EVERYWHERE?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very few if any glues contain gluten. The whole glutened by an envelope thing is a myth.

Something that happened today: As I was opening a package of gluten-free Canadian bacon, I had to peel off tons of sticky tape, not to mention the glue that held the top of the package together -- is it gluten-free? Had I not been careful, I could have easily cc'd the meat if it is not.

And what about the sticky peel-off-thingy that's on the aseptic container that holds my gluten-free broth?

Or the glue that holds the foil to the back of my sinus pills?

Or the glue that holds the foil to the top of the Smucker's honey, in the little single-serving packets? (My husband had called the company to ask about this once, and they said "Oh, it should be fine." But they weren't sure.

Or the sticky part of a Sticky Note? Is it full of gluten, the same as a stamp or an envelope (I imagine this one is a resounding yes -- I'm really more concerned about the food stuff).

Okay, so please tell me . . . am I just being paranoid here, or do I have to worry about these gummy-gluey-sticky things that are on food/drugs EVERYWHERE?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow -- I've read everywhere that envelopes are problematic. That's news to me. Thank you for posting your reply!

I am now about 6 months into being diagnosed. There is so much to learn!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, the anal side of me wonders if the corn starch used is absolutely gluten-free.

Does anyone know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow -- I've read everywhere that envelopes are problematic. That's news to me. Thank you for posting your reply!

I am now about 6 months into being diagnosed. There is so much to learn!

As for pressure-adhesive USPC stamps -- they are wonderful, but if my fingers touch the sticky side, is there a risk of cc if I touch something else and then put it in my mouth? In other words, is there a chance of ANY gluten in there -- envelopes with corn starch, adhesive stamps, Scotch Tape (or any brand) . . . whatever.

And what about the stickies on fruit, honey, broth, etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to learn that cornstarch is in envelope glue. I need to avoid that, too.

Yes, so many of us ere are also sensitive to corn. Good point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I JSUT read in Elizabeth Hasselbeck's book that envelope glue had gluten in it. Her book is cowritten with a gastro doctor. It's hard to determine who to believe, so I just don't like them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I JSUT read in Elizabeth Hasselbeck's book that envelope glue had gluten in it. Her book is cowritten with a gastro doctor. It's hard to determine who to believe, so I just don't like them!

Sadly, there is A LOT of misinformation in her book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hasselbeck's book is not a good source for gluten-free information.

Believe me, we all have a lot more to worry about than stick labels. They are gluten-free.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, there is A LOT of misinformation in her book.

Good to know -- thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very few if any glues contain gluten. The whole glutened by an envelope thing is a myth.

I am SO grateful to learn that envelopes are not made with glue from wheat. Still though, I am not convinced that envelopes are safe for those who are especially sensitive to small traces of gluten.

I for one cannot use corn starch unless it is labeled gluten free, and even then I have problems with some brands. Unless the envelope company is using gluten-free corn starch, there might be problems.

I should add that at work, I was licking multitudes of envelopes a day -- not just one or two. I was sick, but I am not sure if they made me sick since I was still eating gluten then, too. I haven't tried licking an envelope since.

Are there any super-sensitive folks out there who can lick a lot of envelopes without a problem? Or does it make you sick? Please post here! I'd love to know. Thank you so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hasselbeck's book is not a good source for gluten-free information.

Believe me, we all have a lot more to worry about than stick labels. They are gluten-free.

richard

Thank you, Richard! Might you help: I am working on a project: What is your source for the labels being gluten free? MUCH appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Richard! Might you help: I am working on a project: What is your source for the labels being gluten free? MUCH appreciated.

I apologize, but I've read this in so many places that I no longer have a link to where it came from. You might find something through a google search. I've been gluten-free for more than 8 years and really haven't worried at all about sticky labels.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am SO grateful to learn that envelopes are not made with glue from wheat. Still though, I am not convinced that envelopes are safe for those who are especially sensitive to small traces of gluten.

I for one cannot use corn starch unless it is labeled gluten free, and even then I have problems with some brands. Unless the envelope company is using gluten-free corn starch, there might be problems.

I should add that at work, I was licking multitudes of envelopes a day -- not just one or two. I was sick, but I am not sure if they made me sick since I was still eating gluten then, too. I haven't tried licking an envelope since.

Are there any super-sensitive folks out there who can lick a lot of envelopes without a problem? Or does it make you sick? Please post here! I'd love to know. Thank you so much.

I have a sponge device that has a water reservoir attached that is just for such things as sealing envelopes, and back in the day, applying stamps. If you are losing sleep over this issue, go to an office supply store and look for one. I think they are widely available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I apologize, but I've read this in so many places that I no longer have a link to where it came from. You might find something through a google search. I've been gluten-free for more than 8 years and really haven't worried at all about sticky labels.

richard

Thanks; I understand.

Does anyone else out there have a reference to validate this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lynayah, it would be easy to wash your fruit well and, if you felt it necessary, cut out the area where the label was stuck to.

There are so many areas of concern on the gluten free diet, this one appears to be an easy fix. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As part of my job in hawaii I sometimes design and and have commercially printed stickers for growers to test market different varieties of avocados, bananas or citrus. Granted these are not on fruit where you would just eat the peel but in my 5 years of being gluten-free and testing fruits from all over the world, I've never had a problem. BUT i do cut off the stickers and most of the skin -- I know how they pick, pack and artificially ripen most fruit. Honestly I would be more worried about what the things are sprayed with than possible glue contamination. I dont mean wheat sprays or things with gluten, just pesticide and herbicide residue. If I shop for my family for something to eat, if I dont grow it, it comes from my neighbors or farmers market.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lynayah, it would be easy to wash your fruit well and, if you felt it necessary, cut out the area where the label was stuck to.

There are so many areas of concern on the gluten free diet, this one appears to be an easy fix. :)

Thank you for your excellent post.

I agree.

Still, I want to know more.

With my journalism background, I just can't help it. I'm really interested in exploring this sticker thing -- everything from Post-It Notes to fruit stickers.

In addition to exploring at celiac.com, I am in the processes of contacting FDA, etc. But, as many of us here have come to realize . . . "experts" are not always the experts. :)

Many times, WE are the experts, which is why I am counting on everyone here to let me know what they know -- again, thank you for your post!

<laughing> All of this must seem a bit anal (because, let's face it, it IS), but my gut tells me this is something I need to pursue, so I'm going with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As part of my job in hawaii I sometimes design and and have commercially printed stickers for growers to test market different varieties of avocados, bananas or citrus. Granted these are not on fruit where you would just eat the peel but in my 5 years of being gluten-free and testing fruits from all over the world, I've never had a problem. BUT i do cut off the stickers and most of the skin -- I know how they pick, pack and artificially ripen most fruit. Honestly I would be more worried about what the things are sprayed with than possible glue contamination. I dont mean wheat sprays or things with gluten, just pesticide and herbicide residue. If I shop for my family for something to eat, if I dont grow it, it comes from my neighbors or farmers market.

GREAT comment.

I agree that what goes on (or around) the fruit is a definite issue. I've started buying organic whenever possible, and I feel so much better doing so.

So, I guess you might say I am equally worried about both issues . . . with organic being No. 1.

I do not know if it is my imagination, but I really do believe that I do MUCH better on organic fruit and vegetables . . . AND I also seem to do better on non-genetically modified produce.

For example, I seem to react to corn, BUT if I eat non-GMO corn, I'm okay. I also do better with heirloom variety legumes as opposed to basic store bought varieties.

I am still experimenting with all this and time will tell, but bottom line: we probably need to eat food the way nature intended us to eat food.

Thank you again for posting your insightful reply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.foodnews.org/fulllist.php is a list I just received today.

I think we will see more and more of this as time marches on. I also think we will see links between celiac and other dietary issues and the altered food sources that cause them. I dont see how it can all be blamed on genetics.

My background is wire service journalism and while in Asia trained as a chef and in horticulture.

take care

GREAT comment.

I agree that what goes on (or around) the fruit is a definite issue. I've started buying organic whenever possible, and I feel so much better doing so.

So, I guess you might say I am equally worried about both issues . . . with organic being No. 1.

I do not know if it is my imagination, but I really do believe that I do MUCH better on organic fruit and vegetables . . . AND I also seem to do better on non-genetically modified produce.

For example, I seem to react to corn, BUT if I eat non-GMO corn, I'm okay. I also do better with heirloom variety legumes as opposed to basic store bought varieties.

I am still experimenting with all this and time will tell, but bottom line: we probably need to eat food the way nature intended us to eat food.

Thank you again for posting your insightful reply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • February 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
×