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David in Seattle

Is There Something About The Pacific Northwest?

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I still have no firm diagnosis of my gut issues, could be Celiac, could be an IBD variation, could be gamma rays from the planet Flatulus, so far I have no idea, but in the process of cruising a number of forums like this one on the applicable subjects, it seems like there is a higher than expected number of people from the Pacific Northwest in general, and the Seattle area (like me) in particular. Certainly just an anecdotal observation, and maybe I'm just being preoccupied and self absorbed, but I'm wondering if maybe the generally low light levels at this latitude, perhaps with their commensurate vitamin D reductions and/or "Seasonal Affective Disorder" triggers might play a role. It just seems like there's an inordinate representation in these conditions of people from this region. I wonder if areas of similar latitude and cloud cover, say the UK, other countries in the North Sea region, parts of Russia, maybe, do have higher rates of these conditions. I lived most of my life in central Ohio, and while I suffered from fibromyalgia all my adult life there, and while I definitely prefer the climate in the PacNW, there is no doubt I have felt especially lousy since moving here about 3 years ago, and not only in the gut, either.

I guess it could also be that we're an especially "connected" population here, though by this point I would think the differences in that regard in most industrial countries would be fairly minimal.

Anyone else notice this?

David

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I also would suspect that diagnosis is much higher in some areas than in others due to practitioners knowledge (or lack thereof) about Celiac disease.

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Maybe we're just more health conscious.

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I'm in the MidWest currently, was born and raised in the Pacific NorthWestern area and have traveled all over the USA, believe me when I say it's not your area, its just a range of infomation about the dease. The more enlightened you are about your own body the better your health may become. Weather effects Fibro, as does Altatudes... compressions.

I also have Fibro and I can live in highier altatudes much easier than I can lower ones, but everyone is different.

You are going to have these conditions no matter where you rome, you just have to readjust yourself to each area and that can take years. Perhaps before making another move you should do a wee bit more research before you pack up and run out the door. Like take a two week trip and see how you fare in the area, before making any permaniate decisions. I had to learn the hard way, I hope you do it better the next time you head out.

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This is a place particularly prone to SAD (seasonal affective disorder), and as that plays havoc with a number of chemicals, it can certainly affect your digestive system. I was dx'ed with Celiac before I moved here, and my fibro was due to a very stressful, extended job situation. The rapidly cycling weather (barometric pressure, really) definitely did make my migraines worse for a while (but I'm not working outside of being a mom, and off my meds, and haven't had one in over a year). I doubt it has to do with vitD for me, as I am (outside of the pregnancy) an avid hiker, and get *plenty* of sunshine throughout the year, especially during the months where there's enough UV to produce vitD.

I think it's very tempting for many people in Seattle who aren't outdoorsy to stay indoors or minimize time outside during the "wet/cold weather". But ... it's Seattle. Most days have some level of wet/cold. (And oh goodness, when we have these "heat waves" of 85F, everyone scream blood panic and makes a run on air conditioners. /eyeroll) Or maybe it's that we're spoiled with lots of green space near us, but many people don't spend the time outdoors enjoying it. (Time spent in nature has been studied to show a positive, measurable, benefit on mood.)

Personally, living over on the east side of the lake, however, I like to blame Seattle traffic and crowdedness as my reasons for the city making me feel crappy. :P I am really not terribly fond of going into the city.

Another thing, depending on your level of socialness, don't discount the Seattle freeze. It's real, and if you don't already have a social circle, or aren't fortunate enough to find one easily, it can be depressing.

BTW, three years was about my turning point for deciding that I liked the area. And becoming far more active with hiking was a MAJOR reason for that.

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Just to throw a monkey wrench in your theory, I'm from the Midwest and currently living in the Southeast. I have never even visited the Pacific Northwest. :P

I think we notice people that we have things in common with. I have noticed a number of people from either the midwest or the South on here. Never knew there were many from the Northwest until I saw this post. :D

I do associate you area of the country down through California with healthier eating, though. So maybe more people from that area are prone to try a gluten free diet because they are already aware of the connection between food and health. Just my 2 cents. B)

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When I was looking for the answears on the internet what the celiac disease is, and I came across the webpage where one doktor talked about who can get the celiac. Some institute found out that only people with the blood type 0 can get it. There is some other types also, but only like one in 1 000 000. The black people and the people from Europe are geneticly predisposed to carry the genes for the celiac disease.

If she is lying, I'm just helping her, but my blood type is 0 possitive. Hm... It's true?

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When I was looking for the answears on the internet what the celiac disease is, and I came across the webpage where one doktor talked about who can get the celiac. Some institute found out that only people with the blood type 0 can get it. There is some other types also, but only like one in 1 000 000. The black people and the people from Europe are geneticly predisposed to carry the genes for the celiac disease.

If she is lying, I'm just helping her, but my blood type is 0 possitive. Hm... It's true?

Not true! There's an awful lot of misinformation floating around out there. I'm A negative and was diagnosed with a positive celiac blood panel followed by an endoscopy/biopsy (also positive). And I don't think I'm one in 1,000,000.

If you want good solid info, you've come to the right place. biggrin.gif

Also, if you want to pick up a good book to read, I'd recommend Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic by Dr. Peter Green, Director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University.

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Certainly just an anecdotal observation, and maybe I'm just being preoccupied and self absorbed

You state this like it's a bad thing. :D Doesn't it rain quite a bit in your vicinity? I've heard that there is a connection with the change in barometric pressure and general malaise. Of course, it's just a theory and one should never believe everything that is heard. Marlon Brando once said so. Therefore, it must be true. ;)

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