Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Lisa

The Bunny Is Coming

Recommended Posts

MyGlutenFacts.com has published an Easter Candy Listing. As always make an informed choice when dealing with information on the internet or lists.

Look for Gluten Free Easter Candy List there.

Happy Easter!


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


I saw cadbury creme eggs on that list...I thought they contained wheat. The ones I got for my daughter this year had wheat listed in the ingredients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw cadbury creme eggs on that list...I thought they contained wheat. The ones I got for my daughter this year had wheat listed in the ingredients.

The source of glucose is wheat, but processed to the levels that is considered safe for people with Celiac to consume.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The source of glucose is wheat, but processed to the levels that is considered safe for people with Celiac to consume.

I ate some last year that were labled like this and did fine.

I Had some marshmallow peeps today! :P


Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The source of glucose is wheat, but processed to the levels that is considered safe for people with Celiac to consume.

What you say about wheat-based glucose syrup is correct, in fact, Shelley Case, the go-to gluten-free dietitian and author of Gluten Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide says that glucose syrup can be derived from a variety of starches including wheat. Corn is the most common however Europe uses wheat more frequently. The glucose syrups are highly processed and purified and R5 elisa tests have found the majority to contain very little residual gluten if any. The European Food Safety Authority put out a report on the safety of glucose syrups.

Hopefully this helps anyone who comes across 'glucose syrup (wheat)' on a food label.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites