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CalicoSue

Going To Korea And Japan In April

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I inadvertently posted this same message in the Travel section of the forum, and I meant to post it in the International Room. I apologize ahead of time for duplicating this message.

My son is getting married in Daegu, Korea in April. We will then be traveling to Tokyo for a few days before heading back to the U.S.

I have already searched the archives for any useful information on what and how my daughter and I can eat while we are in Korea and Japan. I am hoping there is a little more current information someone could pass on to us now. Unfortunately, I cannot eat seafood or fish, so I think I will be limited somewhat to plain rice and plain veggies and fruit. We are bringing little packets of Gluten-free soy sauce and the usual snacks of crackers, cheese and peanut butter, etc. My son will have a new toaster ready for us for our bread when we get there.

I'm sure we won't "waste away" for the week we are in Asia, but I was hoping someone could tell us what western restaurants that might have some Gluten-free food on their menu that might be in the Seoul and Tokyo airports, as well as in Tokyo (I'm sure there's not too many western restaurants in Daegu!).

We will be landing in Seoul, finding our way to the railway station an hour away and then taking a bullet train to Daegu. Our little version of "Amazing Race" while trying to find food to eat on the way!

Thanks for any information you can pass on!

Sue

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Japan

Personally, I would avoid and "western" restauraunts myself, like the U.S., many chains are based on processed foods that are heavily laden with gluten. A high end restauraunt may be the exception. I recommend finding a shabu shabu restaurant that uses or would agree to use only a piece of konbu in the hot water. If there are gluten eaters among you, have 2 hot pots-and dedicate one gluten-free-no noodles etc. I've done that and it worked well. You can order one batch of stuff as usual and the other batch of ingredients to your specification-meat(thinly sliced beef, pork specialty meats), veg. and tofu cubes etc. bring your soy sauce for dipping and ask for pure yuzu(citrus)if you like. There are places to be found that stick with pure, high quality simple ingredients. You can get a nice cultural experience as they sometimes have traditional seating with tatami mats cushions and low tables.

Been through the Tokyo Airport. Haven't tried finding something to eat there. Incoming, I had a stash of shelf stable foods brought from the U.S. plus stable things I saved from the gluten-free meals that JAL provided. Outbound, I brought a bento that I packed at the place I was staying before I headed to the airport-onigiri, fruit and the like.

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missy'smom beat me again!

She's not only qucik to reply, shes right.

I cant tell you much about Daegu or Korea either but I would not eat the sea weeds which are often processed with soy sauce. The kim chee is ok as long as there is no soy sauce in them.

You could ask for plain boiled veggies in sokme Korean places, especially turnips.

I would bring a small jar of plain mustard or some other condiment you like.

The shabushabu is a good way to go since you dont like or cant have fish.

In Japan there are some good chicken soups made with salt instead of soy sauce but you have to know and have to ask.

I used to be at Narita airport 10 to 20 times a year and although some of the restuarnats are decent, I was usually eating fish or pre-celiac days 6 years ago. IN japan wheat starch is often used in many things, even rice balls (onigiri) so unless you can read or get something on paper

its a good idea not to take chances. I would also print out the dining cards which you should be able to search and find out about.

Good luck

I inadvertently posted this same message in the Travel section of the forum, and I meant to post it in the International Room. I apologize ahead of time for duplicating this message.

My son is getting married in Daegu, Korea in April. We will then be traveling to Tokyo for a few days before heading back to the U.S.

I have already searched the archives for any useful information on what and how my daughter and I can eat while we are in Korea and Japan. I am hoping there is a little more current information someone could pass on to us now. Unfortunately, I cannot eat seafood or fish, so I think I will be limited somewhat to plain rice and plain veggies and fruit. We are bringing little packets of Gluten-free soy sauce and the usual snacks of crackers, cheese and peanut butter, etc. My son will have a new toaster ready for us for our bread when we get there.

I'm sure we won't "waste away" for the week we are in Asia, but I was hoping someone could tell us what western restaurants that might have some Gluten-free food on their menu that might be in the Seoul and Tokyo airports, as well as in Tokyo (I'm sure there's not too many western restaurants in Daegu!).

We will be landing in Seoul, finding our way to the railway station an hour away and then taking a bullet train to Daegu. Our little version of "Amazing Race" while trying to find food to eat on the way!

Thanks for any information you can pass on!

Sue

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I've been gluten-free in Korea for about a year now, and it's tough. Especially if you'll be out with family and friends, dining out is a big issue. The best thing I can recommend is to get a restaurant card that lists your food allergies in Korean, to show to the waitstaff. One thing I have found, if it's possible to make accomodations, Korean restaurant owners are really happy to help.

Be really careful of red pepper paste- most of it has soy in it. And sadly, most Korean foods have red pepper paste in it. I think that kimchi chiggae (kimchi soup) is about your safest bet, or dubu kimchi (uncooked tofu and kimchi). Bibimbop is good without adding any red pepper paste, and some of the meats at galbi restaurants (Korean BBQ) don't have a marinade (the beef that's cut into smaller pieces is my best bet). There are also some great rice and sweet potato noodle dishes, but the sauces are always iffy.

This is sort of a vague description, but if I can help more send me a message! I think Korea is about the hardest place to be gluten-free, but it's a lovely country!

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I inadvertently posted this same message in the Travel section of the forum, and I meant to post it in the International Room. I apologize ahead of time for duplicating this message.

My son is getting married in Daegu, Korea in April. We will then be traveling to Tokyo for a few days before heading back to the U.S.

I have already searched the archives for any useful information on what and how my daughter and I can eat while we are in Korea and Japan. I am hoping there is a little more current information someone could pass on to us now. Unfortunately, I cannot eat seafood or fish, so I think I will be limited somewhat to plain rice and plain veggies and fruit. We are bringing little packets of Gluten-free soy sauce and the usual snacks of crackers, cheese and peanut butter, etc. My son will have a new toaster ready for us for our bread when we get there.

I'm sure we won't "waste away" for the week we are in Asia, but I was hoping someone could tell us what western restaurants that might have some Gluten-free food on their menu that might be in the Seoul and Tokyo airports, as well as in Tokyo (I'm sure there's not too many western restaurants in Daegu!).

We will be landing in Seoul, finding our way to the railway station an hour away and then taking a bullet train to Daegu. Our little version of "Amazing Race" while trying to find food to eat on the way!

Thanks for any information you can pass on!

Sue

Korea is really tough for gluten-free, especially when eating out. I would really avoid any red pepper paste and sauces, and be careful of barley water, which is served often in restaurants. I also think your safest bet would be Bibimbap (rice with veges), but you might make sure that nothing has been marinated in soy sauce. You could also do BBQ or samgipsal (sp?, pork). You usually cook the meats yourself, but, again, you might make sure no soy sauce has been used. Hope this helps!

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I wanted to thank all of you who responded to my inquiry about Korea and Japan. It was fun looking up some of the names of the different foods you suggested to see what they were!

It will be challenging to eat there because of the soy sauce, and I absolutely cannot eat fish or seafood. My plan is to eat mostly the food I am bringing with me, and my future in-laws have already bought me a toaster to use over them (eating Kinnikinnick buns/bread really fills me up). Between the plain white rice (with little Gluten-free soy sauce packages I am bringing with me) and grilled veggies with no sauce, I should be fine. I have heard there is an Outback in Tokyo, which would be fun to splurge and go there. I have Korean and Japanese restaurant cards, and my future daughter-in-law can help translate my food "allergies" to the restaurants. I think I am set.

Thank you!

Sue

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Hope you have a great trip -- If you can access the forum while there we would love to hear about it.

If you get stuck in Tokyo let us know too. I've had an office there 30 years and can get someone to help. There are tens of thousands of better and safe places to eat in Tokyo than outback!

just bring your cards and soy sauce with you.

have fun!

I wanted to thank all of you who responded to my inquiry about Korea and Japan. It was fun looking up some of the names of the different foods you suggested to see what they were!

It will be challenging to eat there because of the soy sauce, and I absolutely cannot eat fish or seafood. My plan is to eat mostly the food I am bringing with me, and my future in-laws have already bought me a toaster to use over them (eating Kinnikinnick buns/bread really fills me up). Between the plain white rice (with little Gluten-free soy sauce packages I am bringing with me) and grilled veggies with no sauce, I should be fine. I have heard there is an Outback in Tokyo, which would be fun to splurge and go there. I have Korean and Japanese restaurant cards, and my future daughter-in-law can help translate my food "allergies" to the restaurants. I think I am set.

Thank you!

Sue

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