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meatslayer

Gluten Free Does Not Mean Gluten Free? Did You Know...

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To be labeled Gluten free the FDA standard is less than 20 ppm. At that level, those with a gluten allergy will not have a reaction. However it becomes a little grayer when you are talking about Celiac. For this reason, the FDA (USA) and the CFIA (Canada) are currently reviewing the standard.

You guys know that? Anyone have any more info? 20ppm is a very small amount (tiny) To most here I would think that a Gluten free label means Gluten free, but not so. I wonder at what PPM it effects a Celiac? Anyone know?

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You guys know that? Anyone have any more info? 20ppm is a very small amount (tiny) To most here I would think that a Gluten free label means Gluten free, but not so. I wonder at what PPM it effects a Celiac? Anyone know?

Meatslayer,

It is different for everyone. Everyone's body reacts differently. That is why there are so many different symptoms. We don't all have the same symptoms either.

Jackay

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Meatslayer,

It is different for everyone. Everyone's body reacts differently. That is why there are so many different symptoms. We don't all have the same symptoms either.

Jackay

Very true indeed, thanks for pointing that out.

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Yet another complication to the mystery that is celiac. 20ppm is really really really tiny, but... you never know. Celiac can present with so many symptoms, so you eat that stuff with 20ppm and you get a sinus infection. Is it due to celiac or just a sinus infection? I was told by a doc who is pretty knowledgable that it's very hard to truly be gluten free because it's just everywhere.

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Yet another complication to the mystery that is celiac. 20ppm is really really really tiny,

unless you eat 40 of them.....

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Another complication for us celiacs with no appreciable symptoms. How do we know when we ate too much gluten?

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Most studies suggest that 20ppm in moderate amounts of most foods won't cause damage to a celiac's intestines (or elevate antibody levels detectably).

Nothing, medically speaking, is true for everyone, of course.

And *some* testable (0 is NOT testable) limit has to be set if there is going to be a industrial use for the term.

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At this point the U.S. has no official gluten-free standard, although 20 ppm is definitely being considered. 20 ppm probably has little to no apparent effect on most people with celiac, but some definitely react. As for having zero percent gluten, no test can determine that, although it can go a good bit lower than 20.

richard

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And *some* testable (0 is NOT testable) limit has to be set if there is going to be a industrial use for the term.

What Tiffany said, as usual, is right on the money. :)

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unless you eat 40 of them.....

I understand what Tiffany said. There has to be a number, something to measure. We then have to be sure we don't eat "40" like Jess said. We will have to be vigilant to what a serving is per the packaging, not what we would usually eat. I know that what I think is a serving of cereal in my bowl is usually closer to 2. I think this problem has come up with transfat as less then 1 unit of fat per serving is considered 0. But everyone usually eats 4 "servings" thus getting 2 units of fat & it isn't really transfat free. Maybe I'll just eat Puppy's gluten-free dog food - it looks like a really balanced diet.

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I understand what Tiffany said. There has to be a number, something to measure. We then have to be sure we don't eat "40" like Jess said. We will have to be vigilant to what a serving is per the packaging, not what we would usually eat. I know that what I think is a serving of cereal in my bowl is usually closer to 2. I think this problem has come up with transfat as less then 1 unit of fat per serving is considered 0. But everyone usually eats 4 "servings" thus getting 2 units of fat & it isn't really transfat free. Maybe I'll just eat Puppy's gluten-free dog food - it looks like a really balanced diet.

Sometimes this is why it's wise to just avoid processed foods, no matter what the label says.I've reacted to a lot of stuff that proudly screamed"gluten free"on the package.You really don't know who handled it,where it was manufactured, and until federal guidelines become a little stricter, it's easy for companies to cut corners and still be in that gray area.Yeah, we all like convenience foods(hell in America it is a way of life),but you have to make the choice as to whether or not taking the chance is worth it.

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