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farmwife67

Is Gluten Sensitivity Inherited Like Celiac?

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"Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity is an immune response to gluten that can happen to anyone. This type of response is not inherited like Celiac Disease. Rather, it involves a normal response to the abnormal appearance of gluten in the body."

I found this on another website and I am wondering if this is true. I thought gluten sensitivity was inherited?

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One has to wonder how the gluten abnormally appeared in the body :o Could it be because of leaky gut??? Do you have the reference for this statement?

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Reading the article all the way through puts the statement in context a little. However, there does seem to be evidence for a genetic predisposition to develop leaky gut in the first place, which was omitted from the article, maybe because the research is still ongoing.

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Since gluten sensitivity is only now being recognized as an illness, I doubt that anyone has done any studies to determine it's inheritance. I believe this site is representing the unknown as untrue.

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When I got my results from enterolab it said I did not have either of the classic celiac genes (2, 8) but did have one gene associated with gluten intolerance (4, 5). I took this to mean that there is a genetic component to non-celiac gluten insensitivity.

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Dr. Fine from Enterolab has not yet published his research in any peer-reviewed medical journal.

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Dr. Fine from Enterolab has not yet published his research in any peer-reviewed medical journal.

He may not be published but there is info out there on other genes linked to celiac/gluten sensitivity. Some of the genes he refers to are even consider to be celiac related genes in other countries. Like my gene. I believe research has shown them both, if they are not indeed just different presentations of the same thing, to have strong genetic links and the genes are very common.

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In answer to your question re the truth in this article ,we need to be scepticle in relation to some of the info we google. I was able to locate 120 peer reviewed article through the University of Victoria on this subject. As you were previously aware Celiac disease (celiac disease) is a multifactorial disorder influenced by environmental, genetic and immunological factors.This abstract is typical of the articles that have been published in the scientific and medical journals I was able to peruse. Hope this helps ;)

Author(s): Garner CP (Garner, C. P.)1, Murray JA (Murray, J. A.)2, Ding YC (Ding, Y. C.)1, Tien Z (Tien, Z.)1, van Heel DA (van Heel, D. A.)3, Neuhausen SL (Neuhausen, S. L.)1

Source: HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS Volume: 18 Issue: 21 Pages: 4219-4225 Published: NOV 1 2009

Times Cited: 2 References: 28 Citation Map

Abstract: Celiac disease is a common disease with a prevalence of similar to 1%. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) and follow-up study identified eight loci significantly associated with celiac disease risk. We genotyped the top 1020 non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the GWAS study that were genotyped in the previous follow-up study. After quality control assessments, 975 SNPs were analyzed for association with 906 celiac disease cases and 3819 controls, using logistic regression. Additional genotype data were generated by imputation and analyzed across the regions showing the strongest statistical evidence for association. Twenty SNPs were associated with celiac disease with P < 0.01 in the current study as well as in the previous follow-up study, of which 16 had P < 0.001 and 11 had P < 1 x 10(-11). Five of eight regions identified in the follow-up study were strongly associated with celiac disease, including regions on 1q31, 3q25, 3q28, 4q27 and 12q24. The strongest associations were at 4q27, the region most strongly associated in the GWAS and follow-up study and containing IL2 and IL21, and at 3q28 harboring LPP. In addition, we provide new evidence for an association, not previously reported, on 2q31 harboring a strong candidate gene, ITGA4. In conclusion, in this first follow-up study of celiac cases from the USA, we provide additional evidence that five of eight previously identified regions harbor risk alleles for celiac disease, and new evidence for an association on 2q31. The underlying functional mutations responsible for these replicated associations need to be identified.

Document Type: Article

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My grandmother is celiac, as was my great grandmother, my dad is allergic to gluten and I am only gluten intolerant. I see a genetic link through MY family, I'm not sure about everyone else's but my family history kind of makes me think it's genetic.

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I have celiac, but no one else in my family does/did (including grandparents, aunts/uncles and cousins). That's not to say there aren't perhaps some gluten-intolerant people among them, perhaps, who aren't showing significant symptoms. Perhaps celiac is carried on a recessive gene, so it takes a "recessive" mom and dad produce a child with celiac. Maybe that is why no one else in my family has celiac: two recessive genes have never come together until now.

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"Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity is an immune response to gluten that can happen to anyone. This type of response is not inherited like Celiac Disease. Rather, it involves a normal response to the abnormal appearance of gluten in the body."

I found this on another website and I am wondering if this is true. I thought gluten sensitivity was inherited?

"Gluten sensitivity is found in all DQ types except DQ4..."

Please see Celiac Disease Genetics by Dr. Scot Lewey: http://www.celiac.com/articles/21628/1/Celiac-Disease-Genetics/Page1.html

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I have celiac, but no one else in my family does/did (including grandparents, aunts/uncles and cousins). That's not to say there aren't perhaps some gluten-intolerant people among them, perhaps, who aren't showing significant symptoms. Perhaps celiac is carried on a recessive gene, so it takes a "recessive" mom and dad produce a child with celiac. Maybe that is why no one else in my family has celiac: two recessive genes have never come together until now.

Celiac is strongly genetic and I would bet that there are folks in your family that also have it if you do. They just don't know it and no one has tested them for it since we don't screen for it here in the US. Would save millions of health care dollars if we did. However Celiac isn't inherited like most genetic defects. It is neither recessive or dominant (as far as I know). It is more of a genetic type, if that's the right way to put it. You only need one 'celiac related' gene to get celiac.

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It is neither recessive or dominant (as far as I know).

Incompletely penetrant. Probably more than one gene. I think it's likely that gluten intolerance is a gene/gene grouping, and what is classically defined as 'Celiac' is gluten intolerance combined with a few of the HLA types that can interact with the gluten molecule. Since all the studies are only done on biopsy-positive Celiacs, that is the only aspect of the disease that has ever been studied.

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