Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

Lycopene

I'm So Careful. But All This... Bah.

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I'm sorry to make another thread. ): Just. I keep getting glutened. CC. Breathing in flour on accident. Finding out my cat's food has gluten in it (got her a handful of food and just wiped my hand off on my pants. Wiped my mouth because of a tickle a few minutes later). Ugh. I'm sick. Starting to get better and just be sapped of energy, but then I get glutened again and throw up more.

Friend is coming in less than two hours and who knows how much longer I'll be throwing up now... Ugh. No matter how much I clean my kitchen, with 5 other people cooking in it and all of them gluten eaters... it just can't get clean enough. Sigh. =.= This is too much. I can't handle being sick constantly like this... It just hurts so bad. =.=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to make another thread. ): Just. I keep getting glutened. CC. Breathing in flour on accident. Finding out my cat's food has gluten in it (got her a handful of food and just wiped my hand off on my pants. Wiped my mouth because of a tickle a few minutes later). Ugh. I'm sick. Starting to get better and just be sapped of energy, but then I get glutened again and throw up more.

Friend is coming in less than two hours and who knows how much longer I'll be throwing up now... Ugh. No matter how much I clean my kitchen, with 5 other people cooking in it and all of them gluten eaters... it just can't get clean enough. Sigh. =.= This is too much. I can't handle being sick constantly like this... It just hurts so bad. =.=

First off, I'm certain others have noted this, but are you positive that you don't have other intolerances? Secondly, I share a kitchen with no fewer than 25 gluten eaters (and possibly more like 40 or 50). I haven't been glutened because of my kitchen in months. And the trick is really, really simple: find some place--some place that is not your kitchen, and where the gluten eaters probably haven't used--where you can prepare everything.

For me? I'm a college student. I could risk the living room or the dining area. But I won't. I prepare everything in one corner of my dorm room. If it's a multi-stepped meal, I bring each stage back to my room. It saves my health and keeps the pain to a minimum.

Good luck. And it does get better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't know if I have any other intolerances or not. I THINK soy might be one. I really can't afford to go to the doctor's either to be checked. But, I'm going to do what you do. Prepare my food elsewhere. That's a good idea. I can do it at my computer desk in my room. Thank you for that idea. That'll help, I'm sure.

Think I should just take out all 8 common allergens? Readd them one by one? I guess I'll have to try it that way. Going to take a longgg time, but better than nothing. I just seriously can't handle all this pain. It hurts so bad when I get sick, ugh. ~_~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lcopene, I'm so sorry to hear you are so sick. Can you cancel your friend coming over today and just crawl back in bed?

Are you newly gluten free? I've only been gluten free for two weeks and feel so much better, although I didn't feel great a week ago after cleaning out my gluteny pantry. It's such a huge learning curve and I'm still astonished that companies seem hell-bent to put gluten in so many products.

I hope you feel better soon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Think I should just take out all 8 common allergens? Readd them one by one? I guess I'll have to try it that way. Going to take a longgg time, but better than nothing. I just seriously can't handle all this pain. It hurts so bad when I get sick, ugh. ~_~

Probably. You might just need to give your gut time to heal. Sadly it doesn't happen overnight (I wish it had!); it took a while and a lot of damage to get to this point so it will take time to go back. I couldn't tolerate any dairy, even stuff that was essentially lactose-free (butter, hard cheese) for a couple of months after going gluten-free. Ditto for things like broccoli, bell peppers, and alcohol. I didn't have problems with soy but it's a really common trigger food. Ditto for eggs. Try it and see if you feel better after a couple of weeks, then add them in one at a time to see what happens. You might find that after giving your gut a break, you can handle more things. Or not, but at least you'll know what to avoid.

Sharing a kitchen with gluten-eaters is hard, too. My husband and I finally decided that our kitchen had to be gluten-free except for his homebrewing (and he has his own pans and supplies for that). But I like the suggestion for you to store and prepare everything in a separate place. If you can manage the cost, maybe pick up a cutting board, a pan or two, and a colander (if you make pasta) for your use only. Places like Target and Walmart usually offer some good deals on kitchen stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been diagnosed for a year, but only been steadily on the diet for 6 weeks. (Been on it for longer periods of time before, but I always cheated... never again!... on purpose, ugh).

Can't cancel though. =/ So it's gonna be hellish. D: She'll be here in about 2 hours... bah. )=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a few thoughts for living with Gluten Eaters! I have these thin plastic "cutting boards". Got them at Bed bath & beyond but have seen at Walmart, etc. Usually a set of 4 is less then $10. I put one on the counter when preparing my food even if I have washed the counter or table. Could use for a place mat, too. Would give you a good surface if you want to prepare in another room. If you don't have your own plates, pans, knives, etc I would wash & dry with your own clean sponge & towel before use. I have to remind the kids that when pouring ketchup or BBQ on bread, don't touch the bread(good idea anyway). If you share these things, might want to get your own & some colored tape (Duct at Walmart in many colors) & cover it in tape to show them not to use it.

Also, I think you are new to this & my first 4 weeks or so, I felt better but had bad days or hours. I think that some foods are hard to digest & my intestines are not able to yet (popcorn bothered me but not now - maybe its scratchy).

Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope this doesn't sound snarky but why would you scoop cat food bare handed?

We have a cat as well and keep her food in a tupperware container than we can shake out into her bowl. This way I never touch her food.

It's good practice for us gluten-free folks to be really wary of what we touch, wash our hands frequently and treat anything with gluten the same way we would handle raw chicken. If I'm suspicious of something I use my left hand. I'm right handed and typically would scratch my nose, for example, with my right. Same goes with door handles and accepting something handed to me. I always use the left. This way my right hand stays less contaminated.

Wow, that sounds so Howard Hughes (OCD) of me! B) I find it helps though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Kayo

I dunno. I guess it's just laziness. She eats *SO* much, so I have to keep filling up her bowl. Bah, it was stupid. I wasn't thinking. I worry about MY food all the time that I didn't think to worry about HER food too. And yeah, I know what you mean. I'm left-handed so I do the exact same stuff, just opposite. [:

@i-geek

This is just so weird. Really unlike anything I've ever experienced. I'm going to only eat whole foods now. Nothing processed or packaged. No soy, dairy, and obviously no gluten. I am in UNBELIEVABLE pain today. My gut just hurts like it's never hurt before... I'm going to go lay down after this. ]:

It's sort of overwhelming. x_x

@kareng

Yeah. I'll be going out later today to get some of those plastic cutting boards. That's a great idea.

@everyone

I'm going to try to get her eating gluten-free cat food as well. I'll look into purchasing that later. Heh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that sounds so Howard Hughes (OCD) of me! B) I find it helps though.

:P:P:P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:P:P:P

I'm OCD about handwashing anyway, it probably helps the CC issues LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • March 20, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      86,753
    • Most Online
      4,125

    Newest Member
    Courtney Carter
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      112,047
    • Total Posts
      956,561
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Forum Discussions

    Hello All, (I"m sorry if this is posted in an inappropriate location --- I was not sure just exactly where this subject would be most appropriately placed.) I have just started the Fasano Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet a few days ago, and I think I have a pretty good understanding of it, but I am still unclear about one aspect of it, and that is processed fruit and vegetable juices. In the Fasano Diet guidelines, it states that "100% fruit and vegetable juices" are permissi
    CyclingLady, czy ty jest Polskie?  Wow, that is too funny!  Do you make golabki also?  I never developed the knack for making good golabki somehow, but my mom makes them awesome.  Too bad we don't have any good substitute for pierogi --- I don't think anyone is ever going to make a gluten-free dough that is that thin and stretchy that still holds together. I do make a mean wild mushroom soup, from wild mushrooms that I gather and dry here in Alaska.  I used to make a pretty damned good mako
While in retrospect it is quite obvious that I had GI symptoms of celiac disease for most of my life (I am 56 years old now), it was only after getting a bread machine in 2012 that I started to get the dermatitis herpetiformis.  Up until then, I was eating whole-wheat pasta, and wheat-containing breakfast cereals, but only rarely ever ate bread (I was picky, and only liked artisanal bread).  And then, I was suddenly eating bread four or five days a week!  And not only bread, but whole wheat brea
  • Blog Entries

  • ×
    ×
    • Create New...