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Guest Viola

I think the only total way someone can be completely gluten free in their own home is ... live alone ... or ... live with another Celiac.

I suppose you can 'impose' gluten free on your partner and the rest of the family, but then for the most part, there is going to be added stresses and a conflict of 'rights'.

If a partner puts as much financially and physically into the home as you do ... do you have the right to impose such a restrictive diet on them? And yes ... even though we consider it a healthier diet, it is "restrictive" and may not be considered healthier by many others.

So ... around here I just try and be as vigilant as possible and realize that there are going to be some ups and downs. The emotional stress of fighting with a spouse (they are almost always on the defensive) isn't worth it. :blink:

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I think those neverending bread crumbs have glutened me yet AGAIN :angry::unsure: I was glutened on the weekend but don't know how... I had a little talk with everyone in my family and there are going to be some changes around the house. Big bright lables on everything that it mine! It's really scary though... I mean I didn't see bread crumbs (obviously) and I didn't eat anything out of the ordinary. I would hate to see what would happen to me if I ate a slice of bread :blink:

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Our house is almost completly gluten-free. I yell/remind hubby and kids if they start to prepare ANY food and a drawer is open. I yell/remind hubby and kids if they dust the crumbs off their hands, etc. They now ask if they can use my cutting board for cutting plain veggies.

Only big exception is we bought a small regular bag of flour for my step-daughter to practice her 4-H cooking project and hubby wants to keep the flour in case she wants to cook again...I said, No, she can cook with my flours and my ingredients for the family if she wants to cook.

My dad just came out for a visit and called me fanatical, well, I am because I got tired of getting sick in my own house. I also was very cautious around him because when he was done eating his sandwhich at lunch time on the boat (that we bought on the way), there was a 3 foot ring of crumbs around where he sat, near the cooler with my ice for my drinks. Also, the rest of the family usually leaves my special food alone since I am so limited. I clean the kitchen constantly.

However, I do make exceptions and am very cautious when I do, biscuits and gravy on occasion, cakes for birthdays (I am the only gluten-free person in house), etc. Most items are made my way most of the time but some things just taste different.

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This seems like a good place to voice something that is increasingly more worrysome to me. Right now, I live in Georgia with two other roommates. I was diagnosed back in May, and I have just now gotten the kitchen and the diet under control. However, in a month, I am moving to Michigan to start grad school. It's an art academy, so the kitchens are in the studio buildings and not the dormitories. It's sooo cheap to live on campus, it's too good to pass up. It'd cost me about $700 more a month to live off campus (the school is in a pretty nice area).

Anyway, getting to the point, is it possible for me to share a kitchen with 14 other students? I am planning to bring some of my own essentials (cutting board, wok, some baking dishes, etc). Is it possible for me to be safe in an environment like this? It seems like I could manage it to me, but then again, I'm still new at this. I don't think there are dishwashers in the kitchens, can I just keep my own sponge and wash plates with that? Does anyone have any suggestions? I really don't know if I can financially handle living off campus. Trying to get diagnosed this past year has wiped out the majority of what I had saved up for grad school. It's such a small group of students, it seems like I could just talk to them, doesn't it? I would really love some advice on this topic. (I've been taking notes on all the previous posts)

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My house is absolutely non-compliant but I have found something that is really easy and prevents those nasty little gluten crumbs from getting on my food :) Each time I prepare food, I pull out a thick kitchen towel and lay it down on the counter. *Nothing* I eat goes off the towel - and I have a safe place to rest spoons & such. After I'm done with the meal, the towel goes in the wash :) It works! And it's a lot cheaper to wash towels than constantly buy flimsy paper towels ;) You guys might try this :) And if you have access to a washing machine right next to the kitchen, put a towel down on the table too! (Or, just move the new towel you just used, being sure to keep the gluten side down.) I suppose you could do this with a cutting board too, I just like the convenience of just throwing the towel in the wash - plus, they are usually bigger than cutting boards.

About grad school - I think that you should probably have good luck with a small group of fellow students - but remember, it just takes *one* careless person to gluten you if you aren't extremely cautious! Be careful with you :)

Thanks to everyone who has replied on this post, I've seen so many good ideas :)

Sorry you were glutened Carrie!! :(

- Michelle :wub:

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Maybe see if you can have your own table or something to cook on. Or just talk with your family and tell them that you are really concerned. I'm sure they will do something. :)

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