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RiceGuy

How Much Does Your Bread Rise?

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Hi everyone,

I'm wondering just how much does the typical homemade gluten-free bread rise. I mean, the percentage of the finished product compared to the raw, unrisen dough. The usual suggestion for rising the dough is to let it double in height. Then, when it bakes, it will rise higher (at least it is expected to) as the water turns to steam inside. So, just how much higher is usually achieved? I'd think it would be more than double, for the reasons stated. But how much more can reasonably be expected from a good recipe? Two and a half times the unrisen height? Three times? Four times? What do you usually get? Please post your experiences!

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On the bread I have been baking it rises double in the pan. It bakes at 400 deg. for 10 minutes and you are to cover it with foil for the remainder. By the time it is done it is not double the size baked. However, I know it has had a good rise when I cut it and there small air pockets in the bread. I am also baking it in a oblong clay baker with a clay top.

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The bread I make ends up being just a little over double the size when it is completely done baking. When it is rising it usually is just under double the size before I start baking it. If I over raise the dough it falls while baking and ends up being dense.

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My rise varies greatly by recipe. My french bread ends up twice the size, some almost twice the size, but never anything over twice the size. Some don't rise very much at all :blink:

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If my bread is set to rise for longer then 40 minutes it rise 3 times the "starting" height.

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Wow! Thanks for all the replies! Anyone else?

So then it looks like I may have stumbled upon something...will post the details in the next couple days I think.

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Wow! Thanks for all the replies! Anyone else?

So then it looks like I may have stumbled upon something...will post the details in the next couple days I think.

How mysterious.....

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If my bread is set to rise for longer then 40 minutes it rise 3 times the "starting" height.

What happens when it is baked? Does it remain 3 times the height, or does it go higher, or shrink?

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What happens when it is baked? Does it remain 3 times the height, or does it go higher, or shrink?

It rise about double before I put it in the oven.

If its allowed to rise for 50 minutes it continues to rise about 1/3 inside the oven.

Sometimes it gets holes inside but usually it only gets very light and "fluffy".

When it has been rising for about 50 minutes it looks like this:

IMG_2131.jpg

Before rising:

IMG_2128.jpg

After 40 minutes rising:

IMG_2139.jpg

Finish:

IMG_2148.jpg

(it is same bread)

I prefer to sell it when it has been rising for 40 minutes. It "sticks" more together.

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Thanks kannne. Nice clear pictures too!

Looks to me that you are a professional baker. I'm already looking forward to your feedback on the thread I am preparing to start soon.

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Thanks kannne. Nice clear pictures too!

Looks to me that you are a professional baker. I'm already looking forward to your feedback on the thread I am preparing to start soon.

I wish I was.. But I'm only 19 with no education :P

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I wish I was.. But I'm only 19 with no education :P

Doesn't matter! I'm self-taught in my profession. IMHO, if you can do something well enough to get paid for it, then you are a professional.

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It really depends on the recipe I am using, In my breadmaker I don't think I see much change with rising but then that would mean sitting in front of my machine for 2 hours lol.

With the mix I use while it proves it almost rises to double then I bake it but it kinda shrinks a little upon taking it out of the oven :(

Kannne, I'd love to make bread that looks like yours, How do you do that??

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It really depends on the recipe I am using, In my breadmaker I don't think I see much change with rising but then that would mean sitting in front of my machine for 2 hours lol.

With the mix I use while it proves it almost rises to double then I bake it but it kinda shrinks a little upon taking it out of the oven :(

Kannne, I'd love to make bread that looks like yours, How do you do that??

I have figured out that the yeast is very sensitive to the liquid temperatur. I heat the water until it reaches 38, not more or less. And I let it rise in the oven at 30C.

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Ah, Thanks :)

Is that your own bread recipe you use too or one you found?

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Ah, Thanks :)

Is that your own bread recipe you use too or one you found?

Thats my own.

I want to start a bakery one day :)

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I have figured out that the yeast is very sensitive to the liquid temperatur. I heat the water until it reaches 38, not more or less. And I let it rise in the oven at 30C.

I've read that yeast can survive up to something like 110-130°F. I generally just use hot tap water for the dough, and a warm oven for the rising. I'm not sure of the temp, but I think it's probably between 90 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Sounds like you have tried higher and lower temperatures than the ones you now use. Can you describe what was unsatisfactory about them? Also, what kind of yeast are you using? Instant/Quick/RapidRise/Bread Machine yeast, or standard baker's yeast?

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I've read that yeast can survive up to something like 110-130

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When I started with this recipe it was hopeless. Sometimes it would rise 3x and sometimes it wouldn't rise at all..

I wrote a list in norwegian about the 10 steps I do. I will translate on sunday, now I am to tired :rolleyes: and I am going away (no internett) for on saturday.

When I started to follow those 10 steps and had the exact same temperature on the liquid the bread is the same every time.

I don't know what yeast I use.. Well, I know what yeast I use but here in norway we have 4 types of yeast.

Fresh yeast

Fresh yeast for sweet doughs

Dried yeast

Dries yeast for sweet doughs

I always use fresh yeast.

Interesting. Is the fresh yeast in a cake?

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1. It is big difference between different types of flours and flours blends. Maybe one recipe work with orgran flour blend, but it may not work as good with bobs red mill..

2. I use fresh yeast (cake yeast)

3. Let the dough rise on a warm place. I use the oven.

4. The dough only rise 1 time. When I have knead the dough together I put it in the bread pan immediately .

5. Doughs that are going to be buns, rolls ++ that need to be

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