Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

RiceGuy

Uprisings - Reaching New Heights In Gluten-Free Baking

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

RiceGuy, have you ever used sparkling water in any of your bread experiments? I've run across that suggestion several times...supposedly to give bread a better "lift"?

FWIW, King Arthur Flour has a 9x4x4" loaf pan. "Taller, narrower 9" x 4" x 4"-deep pan is ideal for gluten-free yeast loaves, which require more support as they rise and bake. The extra-tall sides on this pan offer that added support, creating a beautifully shaped loaf, ideal for sandwiches".

http://www.kingarthu...-4-x-4-loaf-pan

I have not tried sparkling water. Sounds like it might work similarly to adding some baking powder, as either would add CO2 gas bubbles. But the water would have to be cold, since CO2 can't stay in the water as it warms up. Have the suggestions been for yeast breads, or mostly for quick breads? Not saying it can't help, but it sounds like it would delay the rising until the dough warms up. Otherwise it would lose a lot of its fizz just getting it to room temp.

Thanks for the link to the pan. At least someone out there is thinking of us :) But now that I've found out that the dough can rise above the pan and not dry out too much, a taller pan doesn't appear necessary. Although, for those who make "batter breads", the taller sides would be required in order to keep the dough from spilling over. My recipe makes a dough which is stiff enough to hold up without spilling. But I'm also not comfortable with silicon coatings or aluminum pans, no matter what the claims. Still it's good to know. Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RiceGuy, when you said 2.5 cups did you mean water or flour? I'm confused:

"Actually, it will need 1 1/2 cups of water for two cups of flour. However, with my 8x4 pyrex pan, that wouldn't reach quite the height we'd typically want for sandwiches. Probably more like 2 1/2 cups or so, though best to measure, using the method in my previous post. Adjust guar gum and psyllium accordingly." RiceGuy

If you meant 2 1/2 c. flour, then how much water would we use? Also, does the yeast amt. change and the apple cider vinegar amt. change if the flour increases by 1/2 c.? Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RiceGuy, when you said 2.5 cups did you mean water or flour? I'm confused:

"Actually, it will need 1 1/2 cups of water for two cups of flour. However, with my 8x4 pyrex pan, that wouldn't reach quite the height we'd typically want for sandwiches. Probably more like 2 1/2 cups or so, though best to measure, using the method in my previous post. Adjust guar gum and psyllium accordingly." RiceGuy

If you meant 2 1/2 c. flour, then how much water would we use? Also, does the yeast amt. change and the apple cider vinegar amt. change if the flour increases by 1/2 c.? Thanks.

I meant 2 1/2 cups of flour, though again, it is best to measure using the method I detailed. That will also tell you how much water to use, for any given amount of flour. And yes, the yeast would also need to be adjusted accordingly, though since I never measure that, I honestly don't have an exact amount to suggest. I generally use less than what most recipes seem to call for, as I don't like it so yeasty. I believe I may have posted an amount earlier in the thread, but I don't recall anything specific. I really need to measure that again.

Although some bakers like adding some vinegar, after experimenting with it, I found no advantage to it. But I did find that too much seems to have a negative effect on the rise. If memory serves, I think I suggested keeping the ACV to less than 1/2 tsp per cup of flour. Check previous posts to be sure, if you want to add the vinegar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMG! I did not know bread was going to be such an issue...I just posted about which machine, etc. Then I see this post that mentions even more ingredients that I have not heard of! Maybe I will just skip bread all together, cuz if you guys cant get it right then I surely an not gonna get it right...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMG! I did not know bread was going to be such an issue...I just posted about which machine, etc. Then I see this post that mentions even more ingredients that I have not heard of! Maybe I will just skip bread all together, cuz if you guys cant get it right then I surely an not gonna get it right...

Please don't fail yourself even before trying!

I bake gluten-free breads and other things most every day, and they turn out quite good IMO. I've also served them to gluten-eaters, who also make positive comments on them. So it's really not difficult to make decent gluten-free breads. There is a learning curve, but I think that is in part due to preconceived ideas from past experience baking with wheat flour.

However, what one person considers good bread, another might not. There seems to be quite a range of opinions as to what constitutes good bread. So it is always wise to try a few different recipes, and see what you like best.

I always try new bread recipe ideas with a small amount of dough, so if it doesn't turn out right, there isn't much to consume (I don't toss it out just because it's not very likable). I also try to keep in mind that if it doesn't turn out as I hoped, it might still be good for some other type of bread item. For instance, a poor sandwich bread recipe might make decent pizza crust, crackers, or some other thing.

Within this thread I give details on how I bake single-serving sizes of bread, about the size of a burger bun or dinner roll.

Explore the possibilities, and enjoy the creative process, and the surprises each time you bake something new!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...