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sandsurfgirl

Sad About Communion Today

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My church does communion about once a month. We've missed church a lot since I was diagnosed 7 months ago. There were months when I was too sick to go. So today was the first day I was in church during communion. I cried because I couldn't take the bread.

I know that God knows. It's not about that. It's just so sad to me that I'm excluded from that.


Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.

Ready to get well and get on with my life!

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Unless your Catholic you can use gluten-free bread. Ask your priest or pastor before the next service.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Sorry you are sad about communion but really there are ways to partake of communion. I would be sad too if I missed communion....

There are several gluten-free wafers that can be purchased, you also can make your own. And I spoke to my church & they allow me to take in my own gluten-free piece of bread or cracker & they or I place it in foil & they take it t the alter & bless it with the gluten bread.But the main thing it is wrapped in foil & it is only opened first as I go first ..and my hand removes it from the foil,. when they do not use the communion wine cups that get tossed & a common cup dipping is happening I also go first before anyone else dunks or drops bread into the common cup. I honestly don't care for the common cup but it happens a couple times a year at my church.

My church agrees that God would not want anyone to become sick from partaking in the body & blood....

Hope this helps a bit .

blessings

mamaw

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Unless your Catholic you can use gluten-free bread. Ask your priest or pastor before the next service.

I know. I had a gluten free cracker in my purse. It's just the idea of it, you know? They use an actual loaf of bread at my church and everyone breaks a little piece off. It's symbolic and I know God understands, but I just felt awkward passing and not taking any.

Celiac takes a lot away from us and this is just one more thing I can't do and it means something to me. And it made me sad.


Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.

Ready to get well and get on with my life!

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Unless you were Catholic, you could offer to bring or bake the gluten free loaf next time.

I've taken freshly baked other things to potlucks. They eat it anyway, and they eat it without hesitation, and I put a label on it anyway. It sort of surprised me, but when presented with the option of homemade vs. store bought people will try the homemade.

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Unless your Catholic you can use gluten-free bread. Ask your priest or pastor before the next service.

I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

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I just bring my own cracker and ask the pastor to bless it the same as the other. If I sat and dwelled on it, I could make myself feel really sad about it but I dont, I just figure I'm glad I have an alternative! :) Sometimes we just have to change our thinking.


41 year old homeschooling mom of 5

ttg iga 88, reference range 0-19 gliadin peptide antibody iga 105, reference range 0-31

endoscopy positive for celiac disease, hiatal hernia, major acid reflux damage

diagnosed with arthritis in my teens, thyroid disease in my 20's, epilepsy in my 20's, adult ADD in my 30's,

suffered from joint pain, migraines, seizures, 4 miscarriages, 2 years infertility, scalp rash, bloating, chronic constipation, acid reflux, weight gain, hashimoto's disease, enlarged thyroid, thyroid nodule, extreme fatigue, low vitamin D, anemia, mouth and nose sores

Started gluten-free diet 10/7/09! Never had another seizure after 10 years of epilepsy. TRUE STORY. 2 babies after going gluten-free

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I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

For info see:

http://www.catholicceliacs.org/

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I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

I get blessed as we used to before partaking in the first communion.


Self diagnosed as gluten free as all tests were negative and the doctor was completely useless.

Gluten Free since June 2010

Suspecting soy and milk as of June 2011

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I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

I sit near the front and only receive Eucharist from the cup. I haven't had a problem doing this yet. If I'm visiting a parish that only offers the bread, I stay in the pew.

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My church does communion about once a month. We've missed church a lot since I was diagnosed 7 months ago. There were months when I was too sick to go. So today was the first day I was in church during communion. I cried because I couldn't take the bread.

I know that God knows. It's not about that. It's just so sad to me that I'm excluded from that.

Oh honey, I completely understand your grief over this. My daughter was diagnosed 6 wks ago and while she won't make her first communion until next year, I cried over the same issue. We are Catholic, so the traditions are a little different. However, I have two thoughts: the first is to google "gluten free communion wafers" and you'll get a variety of links to places where you can order gluten free wafers or bread (I noticed there were different links for different Christian/Catholic faiths.) The second would be to share with your pastor how deeply this affects you, and see what he or she will do to work with you on this. Perhaps you could supply the bread and it could be blessed and broken alongside the other bread; so long as he/she broke yours first. I'll say a prayer for your peace and for a resolution. Note to Catholics: there is an order of nuns in the midwest that has created church approved gluten free communion hosts. Google it and you'll find it; there is only one. Hugs, Emily

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I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

There is an order of nuns in the midwest that you can order church approved gluten free hosts from. Google "gluten free communion wafers for Catholics" and you'll get the link to order them. I would not recommend what many priests direct people w/celiac to do, which is to refrain from the Eucharist and partake only in the precious blood/wine. By sipping from a communal cup that others have been drinking out of immediately after consuming the Eucharist as bread, you are undergoing MAJOR cross contamination. We've been advised to bring our own gluten free Eucharist and keep it in a pix in the tabernacle. Talk to your pastor and work out a way that you can receive. At my kids' Catholic school the children with Celiac go up first and receive communion before anyone else. Hope this helps. Emily

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I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

I go up and skip over to the wine. But I make sure it isn't the one the priest dropped a piece of host into. You must be awake & pay attention! :). In the Catholic church, the wine is the same as the host. If you know any Eucharistic ministers explain that is what you are doing. Also, let the priest know so he can spread the news.


 

 

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There is an order of nuns in the midwest that you can order church approved gluten free hosts from. Google "gluten free communion wafers for Catholics" and you'll get the link to order them. I would not recommend what many priests direct people w/celiac to do, which is to refrain from the Eucharist and partake only in the precious blood/wine. By sipping from a communal cup that others have been drinking out of immediately after consuming the Eucharist as bread, you are undergoing MAJOR cross contamination. We've been advised to bring our own gluten free Eucharist and keep it in a pix in the tabernacle. Talk to your pastor and work out a way that you can receive. At my kids' Catholic school the children with Celiac go up first and receive communion before anyone else. Hope this helps. Emily

having them do it first is a great idea.

In the protestant church, you don't go up in front of the church. The ushers bring a plate around. The cup isn't one communal cup. It's a bunch of little plastic cups and you take one from the tray. So in that sense, I was able to have some anonymity. I took the cup and not the bread.

However, in the protestant church we don't have confession or anything like that. If you believe in Christ you take communion. So there aren't people refraining from taking it unless they are not Christians. I was sitting next to an acquaintance and she looked at me funny when I passed the plate to her without taking it. We are in the same homeschool group that I just joined and I felt compelled to explain, which is sort of embarrassing.

IMPORTANT NOTE: So far I'm loving this kind, supportive conversation. May I request that anyone who posts to this keep it that way? No arguing or debating doctrines or how people take communion at different churches please. Let's keep this thread for support and ideas of how celiacs can participate in their respective churches if they choose to do so.


Lots of doctors diagnosed me with lots of things including IBS, lactose intolerance, wheat intolerance, and quite a few of them threw up their hands in total confusion.

Had GI symptoms, allergy symptoms and unexplained illness my whole life.

Jan. 2010 Diagnosed celiac at the age of 40.

Ready to get well and get on with my life!

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Coincidence that you should post this just today (well, yesterday I guess, since I'm writing this on Monday morning). I had the same problem yesterday in church, the first communion Sunday that I've been in church since I was diagnosed. I'm Presbyterian so we have communion once per month and I've missed the last two because of vacation and travel.

Anyway, in my church we do it one of two ways. Either we pass plates up and down the pews, one with bread cubes on it, and the other with small individual cups of juice. (sadly no wine, lol...) The other way is that we come down the aisle to where a server is holding a big hunk of bread. We tear off a piece and dip it in the chalice of juice that another server is holding.

Like I said, normally we only have communion once per month. But wouldn't you know, the summer that I'm diagnosed my pastor decides to do a 6-week preaching/study series about communion. Including communion every single Sunday! oy... So, she and I sat down to talk about it and her idea was to get some gluten-free hosts and on the Sundays that we pass trays the gluten-free would be in a small cup on the tray with the bread. On the Sundays we come down front she would put the gluten-free host on the communion table and I could pick it up on the way by and dip that.

Well, I'm sure you can see problems with that last one. Major cc since the regular bread is crumbly and there are always crumbs in the juice. I could go first, but that would mean I'd have to sit right up front. eek.. lol... (funny, when I'm leading worship I don't mind being up front, obviously... but if I'm just sitting in the pew then I like to be at least in the middle.) -- Anyway, the other problem with the host on the table is that it makes me different. I know, get over it. But it bothers me that everyone else is eating from the common loaf and I'm not. Passing the trays is different because everyone is taking a separate piece of already-cut bread.

The last option that we thought of, especially for this summer series, is for me to provide a loaf of gluten-free bread. Based on the two kinds of bread I've tried so far I think this is NOT a good idea. gag... However, today I'm finally going to get over to Whole Foods and buy some Udi's that you all rave about and we will see....

Anyway, I hear you. It's just one more thing that makes this so difficult. Yesterday we did communion by coming up to the front and I was one of the servers. When the pastor offered me the bread and cup before we started serving the congregation I almost took a piece of bread. In fact I might have if it wasn't for the fact that I had to go from there to the nursing home where I'm chaplain to lead Sunday afternoon worship. I decided that was best done when I wasn't feeling sick! lol... But I think I would have otherwise, and just suffered the consequences. Which is not a good solution.

If you or your church are looking for gluten-free wafers try Cokesbury. You can order them on-line and they ship very quickly.

I'll let you know how my experiment with the Udi's bread goes. (the experiment is to see if it can be dunked without falling apart). :)

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There is an order of nuns in the midwest that you can order church approved gluten free hosts from. Google "gluten free communion wafers for Catholics" and you'll get the link to order them. I would not recommend what many priests direct people w/celiac to do, which is to refrain from the Eucharist and partake only in the precious blood/wine. By sipping from a communal cup that others have been drinking out of immediately after consuming the Eucharist as bread, you are undergoing MAJOR cross contamination. We've been advised to bring our own gluten free Eucharist and keep it in a pix in the tabernacle. Talk to your pastor and work out a way that you can receive. At my kids' Catholic school the children with Celiac go up first and receive communion before anyone else. Hope this helps. Emily

Please do make sure to read the previous link and the links attached to it throughly. The host is not gluten free it is very low gluten and is made with wheat starch. There will be some who can consume it safely but there will be some who can't.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I have worked with two churches and would happy to help you. :) Our church recently shifted one service to entirely gluten free using Glutino crackers and then all the other services have that option, with a separate cup to dip in. :)

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Please do make sure to read the previous link and the links attached to it throughly. The host is not gluten free it is very low gluten and is made with wheat starch. There will be some who can consume it safely but there will be some who can't.

“Hosts that are completely gluten-free are invalid matter for the celebration of the Eucharist.”

-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

http://www.usccb.org/liturgy/celiasprue.shtml

In response, the low-gluten host designed for Catholics is .01% gluten. Not much, but even a small amount of gluten can begin the autoimmune reaction in a celiac.

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My dad is an usher at his church, and one of the women in his small group is allergic to just about everything. There was a little baggy with a single wafer in it, labeled gluten, soy, dairy, and I don't know what else free, last time he went to give communion. They also have a separate tray with gluten free wafers in case people need them. I'd talk to your head pastor/priest and see what options you guys can arrange.


Self-diagnosed June 7, 2010.

After some dietary experimentation, I'm gluten-free as of June 28, 2010.

Egg free as of July 1, 2010 for elimination diet testing.

Distinct reaction to dairy July 8, 2010.

Going on full elimination diet to rule out all possibilities.

Dairy, soy, nightshade, fish, shellfish, mushroom, peanut, tree nut, and lectins that weren't specified in the above list free as of July 9, 2010.

Strikeouts indicate re-introduced foods that did not generate a reaction.

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I hadn't no idea so many other people where feeling the same way!

I go to a Christian church and we take Communion every week! And my Elder have been 'looking' into a gluten-free bread for over 10 months. AKA they forgot because it's not that important to them. My pastors wife's (God bless her) son had to be gluten-free for two weeks to prep for some tests and she promised she'd tried to find some for me. For now I am just taking the juice, only a few people know and I get odd looks sometimes about it. The one time I tried to take the pinky nail sized piece I was sick for two days. It's just another thing that makes me feel alone.

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I'm catholic and new to gluten free and I've had communion twice since I was diagnosed out of mere habit. How do catholics deal with this? Thanks!!!

Our priest ordered me special gluten-free wafers so I could do communion. He blesses it with the rest and I just go to him first and get the first sip of wine. It just takes some orchestration.


Diagnosed with Gluten Allergy April 2010. Family history of Celiac disease and bowel cancers. Already feeling a billion times better since going gluten free.

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having them do it first is a great idea.

In the protestant church, you don't go up in front of the church. The ushers bring a plate around. The cup isn't one communal cup. It's a bunch of little plastic cups and you take one from the tray. So in that sense, I was able to have some anonymity. I took the cup and not the bread.

However, in the protestant church we don't have confession or anything like that. If you believe in Christ you take communion. So there aren't people refraining from taking it unless they are not Christians. I was sitting next to an acquaintance and she looked at me funny when I passed the plate to her without taking it. We are in the same homeschool group that I just joined and I felt compelled to explain, which is sort of embarrassing.

Girl, I know how you feel. I'm Southern Baptist, and passing on the bread plate is kind of awkward. I've been gluten free for 18 months, and the good thing is people are starting to understand why I just take the juice, but it's still weird. I'm just thankful that God knows my heart, and that my salvation isn't based on whether I eat the bread.

Anyway, I don't have any answers for you than what you already know, but I just wanted to tell you that you're not alone.

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You need to speak to the priest first. It is my understanding the Catholic church mandates communion must have gluten in it to be blessed.

Also,The group of nuns in the midwest are creating a Low gluten wafer NOT a gluten free wafer.

Check first, sometimes individual churches take matters into their own hands to accomodate parishioners.

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I go to a Christian and Missionary Alliance church and what we do is this. The cubes of bread and little plastic cups of juice are passed around by the ushers. Prior to that, those who cannot eat gluten quietly go to the front to pick up gluten-free rice crackers. There are four of us! They are very careful not to make us stand out or feel awkward. Or I just take a rice cracker along. So pleased that they get it! :D


<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

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