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mommyto3

Need Some Help From Other Parents!

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Hi,

I just got confirmation through Enterolab that my son is gluten intolerant (not sure if Celiac or not but either way he must be 100% gluten free from now on). He's 6 and is majorly bummed out about the diagnosis. He's actually been really angry since we found out and I can't blame him. I found out a few months ago that I'm Celiac and have found it really hard to adjust my own diet - can't imagine how it will affect a 6 year old.

Anyways, back to my question. I have to start packing lunches next week for his summer camps and I am at a loss. No idea what to feed the poor guy. I eat really simple lunches myself (chicken salad, soup...nothing really great) so I really don't know how to pack a yummy gluten-free lunch for a kid.

I'd really love some ideas from other parents who've faced this problem. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks :D

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with all the new products on the market for gluten intolerance, you should be able to maintain a similar diet for you and for your 6 year old. My daughter, sister and I all eat gluten free and it's become much easier lately. Recently we discovered Udi breads and muffins. They actually are better than most gluten breads. We've found the whole grain and the sandwich white breads are delicious. I've gone back to eating sandwiches again. The blueberry muffins are wonderful too. If you don't find the Udi brand in your stores, order online a case at a time.

So many other products are on the market that are similar to ones your son probably has eaten before. Amy's has a great macaroni and cheese, tinkyada has rice pastas that are as good as any wheat ones,and Betty Crocker has cake, brownie and cookie mixes that are better than the old gluten ones. In fact, my daughter's friends prefer my gluten free baked goods and are always asking me to make them for them.

It's not so bad now for celiac. In fact, gluten free foods are the fastest growing portion of the food market internationally.

Good luck!

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Like debmom said, the Udi's bread is great and will produce a nice sandwich. My daughter went gluten free at the age of six and has really gotten out of the habit of eating sandwiches. Her lunches include a small container of peanut butter with gluten-free pretzels that she dips into the pb. She used to take corn thins (similar to rice cakes but thinner) and spread pb on those for lunch. Sometimes it's slices or cubes of ham and cheese. For a treat (every once in a while) I will send the "Nachos" Oscar Mayer lunchable (the snack size that has just the corn chips, cheese and salsa). I eat (but not my daughter) chicken or tuna salad that I scoop up with tostito scoops. All the extra stuff (including the fun stuff) can be the same as before . . . chips, yogurt, pudding, fruit, (gluten-free) cookies, fruit chews, etc. Also, get a good quality thermos and send leftovers like mac and cheese.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

animal0028.gif

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Hi,

I just got confirmation through Enterolab that my son is gluten intolerant (not sure if Celiac or not but either way he must be 100% gluten free from now on). He's 6 and is majorly bummed out about the diagnosis. He's actually been really angry since we found out and I can't blame him. I found out a few months ago that I'm Celiac and have found it really hard to adjust my own diet - can't imagine how it will affect a 6 year old.

Anyways, back to my question. I have to start packing lunches next week for his summer camps and I am at a loss. No idea what to feed the poor guy. I eat really simple lunches myself (chicken salad, soup...nothing really great) so I really don't know how to pack a yummy gluten-free lunch for a kid.

I'd really love some ideas from other parents who've faced this problem. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks :D

what would you have packed for him if he was not diagnosed? what does he like?

There are hundreds of mainstream substitutes that are gluten free . My celiac disease girl was diagnosed in April and with just one small glitch I made it thru 2weeks of girl scout camps pretty easily.

we can offer sub's if we know what he likes.

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Hi there,

My 6 yr old was diagnosed a little under 2 months ago, and had the same emotional reaction. Its normal. We've lined up someone for her to talk with who has counseled celiac kids before so that she can find some healthy ways to adjust to this tremendous lifestyle change. And she's getting a lot better, emotionally, 2 mos. into this than in the very first few weeks. Its so hard for them! But it will get easier. Udi's bread, I saw someone recommend it to you a few posts back, is GREAT. You can make him probably any other kind of sandwich he used to eat, but on that bread. Its delicious. Mainstream, coiincidentally gluten free foods include: Lays potato chips; Utz chipz; Frito Lay cheese puffs, cheetos; Pirate Booty; and Tostitos. Glutino pretzels are great. My little girl has a sandwich, grapes and pretzels with almost every lunch. Gluten free treats for the lunchbox: Envirokids chocolate flavored rice krispy bars; Ian's Cookie Buttons; fruit rollups; Glutino oreos; Ian's animal crackers; outback animal cracker snack packs. All fruits are gluten free; you throw in your juice box and he's good to go. In the beginning, because she missed so many of her favorites, I took the advice of Dana Korn in her book, Raising Your Celiac Child, and allowed way more junk food than I ever would have. I found the list of gluten free candy (there's a ton of it) and whenever we had to go somewhere that I knew would offer treats she couldn't eat, I'd let her choose between Starburst, M & Ms, or a Tootsie Pop. If it makes this transition easier for him, surprise him with a little candy in his lunch box and it is going to take the "sting" out of all of the new foods he's adjusting to, and put a smile on his face. Best of luck to you...take care, and remember this too shall pass and he will eventually return to himself. Emily

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Hi there,

My 6 yr old was diagnosed a little under 2 months ago, and had the same emotional reaction. Its normal. We've lined up someone for her to talk with who has counseled celiac kids before so that she can find some healthy ways to adjust to this tremendous lifestyle change. And she's getting a lot better, emotionally, 2 mos. into this than in the very first few weeks. Its so hard for them! But it will get easier. Udi's bread, I saw someone recommend it to you a few posts back, is GREAT. You can make him probably any other kind of sandwich he used to eat, but on that bread. Its delicious. Mainstream, coiincidentally gluten free foods include: Lays potato chips; Utz chipz; Frito Lay cheese puffs, cheetos; Pirate Booty; and Tostitos. Glutino pretzels are great. My little girl has a sandwich, grapes and pretzels with almost every lunch. Gluten free treats for the lunchbox: Envirokids chocolate flavored rice krispy bars; Ian's Cookie Buttons; fruit rollups; Glutino oreos; Ian's animal crackers; outback animal cracker snack packs. All fruits are gluten free; you throw in your juice box and he's good to go. In the beginning, because she missed so many of her favorites, I took the advice of Dana Korn in her book, Raising Your Celiac Child, and allowed way more junk food than I ever would have. I found the list of gluten free candy (there's a ton of it) and whenever we had to go somewhere that I knew would offer treats she couldn't eat, I'd let her choose between Starburst, M & Ms, or a Tootsie Pop. If it makes this transition easier for him, surprise him with a little candy in his lunch box and it is going to take the "sting" out of all of the new foods he's adjusting to, and put a smile on his face. Best of luck to you...take care, and remember this too shall pass and he will eventually return to himself. Emily

Wow...thanks so much for the info! You've given me hope that I can transition him more easily than I thought. I think the problem is that when I was diagnosed a few weeks ago I was trying all sorts of different gluten free products and my husband and I would always comment on how bad everything tasted. I never expected my son to end up having it right after me. Now that is burned into his brain so he's learned to associate "gluten free" with "gross". Even the other day I bought him some gluten free cookies and he was eating one telling me how good it was. I said "that's gluten free hon" and right away he put it down and said "oh" and then walked away without eating it.

I'm going to try the Udi's bread since so many people are raving about it. The issue is that before diagnosis his diet consisted mainly of bread with cream cheese, mini wheats, cereal and pasta (gluten junkie) and he's a really picky eater. So, you can see my dilemma with packing lunches. He's so picky that he barely at even before diagnosis.

A big plus is that my mother took him to a gluten free bakery yesterday (owner is Celiac) and the man was so nice to him letting him sample all sorts of things and pick treats out. He came home so excited. My mom was practically in tears over the fact that we made some progress. It costed a fortune but it was worth it.

Thanks again for the advice :D

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I'm going to try the Udi's bread since so many people are raving about it. The issue is that before diagnosis his diet consisted mainly of bread with cream cheese, mini wheats, cereal and pasta (gluten junkie) and he's a really picky eater. So, you can see my dilemma with packing lunches. He's so picky that he barely at even before diagnosis.

Pasta . . . our whole family likes Tinkyada and it comes in a variety of shapes. It even has a kid version with pasta shaped like cars, rockets, stars, etc.

My daughter likes to eat the gluten-free Van's waffles (if you get these, make sure they are gluten-free because they sell other types, too) with cream cheese . . . and lets face it, it really is about the cream cheese.

Mainstream gluten-free Cereal includes the chex cereals (except for wheat chex, of course), Kix, Fruity Pebbles . . . and more that I can't think of at the moment.

Let him pick some things out to try . . . you obviously got some buy-in from him at the bakery that sounded pretty darn successful.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

animal0028.gif

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I just got back from a week of camp (I'm 19 so I sponsored) and I packed all my own food to eat. I had sandwiches (with Udi's bread, turkey and cheese), Kettle Cuisine Chili, Amy's Mac and Cheese, and some bologna, and corned beef...Stuff that I liked BEFORE being diagnosed :)

Oh and I LOVE Bio Nature pasta the best

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Wow...thanks so much for the info! You've given me hope that I can transition him more easily than I thought. I think the problem is that when I was diagnosed a few weeks ago I was trying all sorts of different gluten free products and my husband and I would always comment on how bad everything tasted. I never expected my son to end up having it right after me. Now that is burned into his brain so he's learned to associate "gluten free" with "gross". Even the other day I bought him some gluten free cookies and he was eating one telling me how good it was. I said "that's gluten free hon" and right away he put it down and said "oh" and then walked away without eating it.

I'm going to try the Udi's bread since so many people are raving about it. The issue is that before diagnosis his diet consisted mainly of bread with cream cheese, mini wheats, cereal and pasta (gluten junkie) and he's a really picky eater. So, you can see my dilemma with packing lunches. He's so picky that he barely at even before diagnosis.

A big plus is that my mother took him to a gluten free bakery yesterday (owner is Celiac) and the man was so nice to him letting him sample all sorts of things and pick treats out. He came home so excited. My mom was practically in tears over the fact that we made some progress. It costed a fortune but it was worth it.

Thanks again for the advice :D

We live in Massachusetts...just wondering where the bakery was? One just opened in Randolph, MA called "AllCanEat" that also offers a gluten free snack bar - they have pizza, sandwiches, breakfast, etc. Is this the same place, or are you out of state?

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We live in Massachusetts...just wondering where the bakery was? One just opened in Randolph, MA called "AllCanEat" that also offers a gluten free snack bar - they have pizza, sandwiches, breakfast, etc. Is this the same place, or are you out of state?

Yep, I'm out of state alright.......I live in Canada :D

But for anyone else reading the post who's from Canada, the bakery was in Oakville, Ontario.

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PB&J on pancakes - VERY easy to make, very yummy to eat, and very easy to use for a packed lunch...oh, and VERY much desired by the other kids! When my son first started taking them to school the other moms asked me what was up because their kids were asking for PB&J pancakes!

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