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For all of you that are nighshade and Lectin sensitive any help for a newbie? I've been reading older post and I feel like I need to try these diets. I'm not sure which direction to head in and what do I eat? It seems overwhleming, but I don't want to bloat or have pain. Thanks!


How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.

George Washington Carver

Blood work positive 4/10

Endo biopsy positive 5/10

Gluten free 5/10

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For all of you that are nighshade and Lectin sensitive any help for a newbie? I've been reading older post and I feel like I need to try these diets. I'm not sure which direction to head in and what do I eat? It seems overwhleming, but I don't want to bloat or have pain. Thanks!

Diagnosing lectin sensitivities is not an easy task because there are so many lectin families, of which the nightshade one is perhaps the most prevalent on the board. Of course there are lectins in gluten too and in many other grains, including buckwheat, millet and quinoa. I do not tolerate quinoa but the other two are okay. I was sensitive to so many legumes that I have excluded the whole family, including green beans and peas (these I challenged - and reacted to - because I had read that I might tolerate those)., Corn is also a common lectin intolerance, as is dairy. And soy and peanuts rank highly too. So to do it the proper way, you would cut out alll those lectin families, and introduce members of them one at a time. That would mean a diet of meats, rice (preferably white), non-nightshade vegetables, fruits,seeds, kind of the basic paleo diet.

To test lectins,I would start with potato, and then tomato. If both of these are okay you will probably be okay with the rest of the nightshadest. Do not muddy up your testing. Take one lectin food at a time and go through one group at a time. Then move on to the next. When testing a food, try to make it a single ingredient food, or that ingredient combined with only known safe foods, so that the results are clear.

Good luck, and let us know how you get on.


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Diagnosing lectin sensitivities is not an easy task because there are so many lectin families, of which the nightshade one is perhaps the most prevalent on the board. Of course there are lectins in gluten too and in many other grains, including buckwheat, millet and quinoa. I do not tolerate quinoa but the other two are okay. I was sensitive to so many legumes that I have excluded the whole family, including green beans and peas (these I challenged - and reacted to - because I had read that I might tolerate those)., Corn is also a common lectin intolerance, as is dairy. And soy and peanuts rank highly too. So to do it the proper way, you would cut out alll those lectin families, and introduce members of them one at a time. That would mean a diet of meats, rice (preferably white), non-nightshade vegetables, fruits,seeds, kind of the basic paleo diet.

To test lectins,I would start with potato, and then tomato. If both of these are okay you will probably be okay with the rest of the nightshadest. Do not muddy up your testing. Take one lectin food at a time and go through one group at a time. Then move on to the next. When testing a food, try to make it a single ingredient food, or that ingredient combined with only known safe foods, so that the results are clear.

Good luck, and let us know how you get on.

Thank you so much, I was free of all of these today and had the best day so far going gluten-free! I did eat some corn chips, had some pain and bloating, but not as bad. It seems kinda sad to give up alot, but I'm trying to stay positive! I need to try new foods.

I read testing should be after a year free of all of these?? What's your thoughts on this?


How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.

George Washington Carver

Blood work positive 4/10

Endo biopsy positive 5/10

Gluten free 5/10

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Yes, I have worked on the one-year plan. Seems to be right for me. :)


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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