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bincongo

Cookbook Christmas List

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I love cookbooks and now I need Gluten free cookbooks. I am making a wish list for Christmas so my kids can buy for me. I brought one and was disappointed so I would rather ask your opinions based on the ones you have tryed.

I would discribe my cooking style as Paula Dean but gluten free now. I don't care if things are low fat, healthy, lactose free or anything like that. I just want good tasting food, butter, sugar and all those sinful things.


Dx Celiac July 2010 by Endoscopy biopsy- had Endoscopy for another reason, not for possible Celiac

Lactose intolerant discovered August 2010

Hypothyroid Dx 2009. Sleep Apnea 2005

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Cruise the internet bookstores for cookbooks by Annalise Roberts, Bette Hagman, Carol Fenster, Connie Sarros and Jules Shepherd. Those authors tend to get great reviews.


---------------------------------

MP - celiac for 10 years

 

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I recently got 100 Best Gluten Free Recipes by Carol Fenster. Corn dogs, bananna bread,and pie crust all work great. I haven't tried any others, but those three were worth the price of the book to me.

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I love cookbooks and now I need Gluten free cookbooks. I am making a wish list for Christmas so my kids can buy for me. I brought one and was disappointed so I would rather ask your opinions based on the ones you have tryed.

I would discribe my cooking style as Paula Dean but gluten free now. I don't care if things are low fat, healthy, lactose free or anything like that. I just want good tasting food, butter, sugar and all those sinful things.

I think I've bought every single gluten free cookbook there is over the last 8 months, and almost every one was disappointing. I'd find one recipe worked and then the next was a failure. Very frustrating! I was mostly looking for baking recipes, though, not regular cooking. Things like pizza crust, pie dough, muffins and cupcakes......

I think I've finally found one that seems to be good, however. It's "Gluten-Free Baking Classics"by Annalise Roberts, and it had rave reviews on Amazon. I've made two recipes, and both have been terrific. I made her French-Italian bread, which was crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, with a wonderful flavor. And I made her carrot spice muffins, which are light and heavenly, and indistinguishable from their gluten-filled counterparts. She's very specific about her flours, but she uses eggs, sugar, oil, all that good stuff.

Another book which I would suggest for basic gluten free cooking is "Gluten-Free Cooking for Dummies" which will take you through all of the basic steps in terms of setting up your kitchen, and which flours do what, and shopping gluten free, as well as having lots of every-day recipes.

I love cookbooks,too, and unfortunately all of the gluten free cookbooks seem more like math primers, than the luscious books with lovely photos that I adore!

All the best, Megan

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I think I've bought every single gluten free cookbook there is over the last 8 months, and almost every one was disappointing. I'd find one recipe worked and then the next was a failure. Very frustrating! I was mostly looking for baking recipes, though, not regular cooking. Things like pizza crust, pie dough, muffins and cupcakes......

I think I've finally found one that seems to be good, however. It's "Gluten-Free Baking Classics"by Annalise Roberts, and it had rave reviews on Amazon. I've made two recipes, and both have been terrific. I made her French-Italian bread, which was crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, with a wonderful flavor. And I made her carrot spice muffins, which are light and heavenly, and indistinguishable from their gluten-filled counterparts. She's very specific about her flours, but she uses eggs, sugar, oil, all that good stuff.

All the best, Megan

I've had that book on my Amazon wish list for some time. My biggest challenge is baking, especially yeast breads. I've been cooking for so many years that I really just don't need another "Joy of Cooking" type cookbook.

In "Gluten Free Baking Classics", does she use individual flours or have her own mixes? I have a complete aversion to making up a bunch of someone's mixes only wondering what to do with them afterwards. Now that might change if I could truly find a "knock-your-socks-off" type recipe. Still searching for that though.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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I've had that book on my Amazon wish list for some time. My biggest challenge is baking, especially yeast breads. I've been cooking for so many years that I really just don't need another "Joy of Cooking" type cookbook.

In "Gluten Free Baking Classics", does she use individual flours or have her own mixes? I have a complete aversion to making up a bunch of someone's mixes only wondering what to do with them afterwards. Now that might change if I could truly find a "knock-your-socks-off" type recipe. Still searching for that though.

I can relate! She uses three different mixes of her own creation, but she gives the quantities for a few different amounts, so you don't have to mix up a big batch if you don't want to. I don't, because I don't need yet another baggie full of another kind of flour around, so I just made enough for the recipe. My difficulty is that I can't tolerate potato starch or xanthan, but I subbed arrowroot for the potato starch she uses, and psyllium husk for the xanthan, and the recipes still came out great. I'm actually excited to try her piecrust next; I've made so many just-ok gluten-free pie crusts, and I'm a real pie crust perfectionist. The two recipes of hers that I did make were so much superior to other gluten-free baking recipes I've used, that I have high hopes for the pie. One thing to note, she uses extra fine brown rice flour in her baking mix; I found it at Whole Foods, but some people might need to order it off the internet.

All the best, Megan

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I can relate! She uses three different mixes of her own creation, but she gives the quantities for a few different amounts, so you don't have to mix up a big batch if you don't want to. I don't, because I don't need yet another baggie full of another kind of flour around, so I just made enough for the recipe. My difficulty is that I can't tolerate potato starch or xanthan, but I subbed arrowroot for the potato starch she uses, and psyllium husk for the xanthan, and the recipes still came out great. I'm actually excited to try her piecrust next; I've made so many just-ok gluten-free pie crusts, and I'm a real pie crust perfectionist. The two recipes of hers that I did make were so much superior to other gluten-free baking recipes I've used, that I have high hopes for the pie. One thing to note, she uses extra fine brown rice flour in her baking mix; I found it at Whole Foods, but some people might need to order it off the internet.

All the best, Megan

Thanks for the additional info, Megan! I'll have to see if I can browse the book on Amazon to get a better feel for it. I don't need yet another baggie full of flour either. The whole top shelf in my fridge is full of flours (well, except for Black Box Chardonnay...biggrin.gif ) and that doesn't even begin to touch the quantity of flours/starches in my pantry.

How interesting about using psyllium husk as a sub for xanthan gum. I do have psyllium husk as well as guar gum. Such a product junkie I am!

Be sure to let us know how the pie crust turns out. I still haven't tried to make pie.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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I went to Amazon and was able to "look" at the books. I put together a whole wish list as well. (I did double check that I had Annalise's book there on my list!) I just picked up The gluten-free gourmet makes dessert! Can't wait to try the recipies. She also has some mixes that she calls for, but it looks like you can figure it out pretty quick. (I always just use left overs for little add ins, like making gravey or sauces) :rolleyes:

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Thanks for all the replys, thats what I need - real cooks who like to cook. I too was known for my pies and haven't baked anything since becoming a Celiac. I have done a few cookies. I have a wish list on Amazon so my kids can order from it. Today I ordered Robert's book and Cooking for Dummies. My daughter is having a baby around Thanksgiving and I will be living with her and her husband for several weeks to help out. I will do the cooking so I just couldn't wait to get a couple cookbooks. When I told my daughter I would be cooking Thanksgiving gluten free she asked me to try the recipes first. She is skeptical about gluten free tasting good. Now my only problem will be working in her kitchen and feeding her 18 month old and not getting CC myself. I am looking forward to it though.


Dx Celiac July 2010 by Endoscopy biopsy- had Endoscopy for another reason, not for possible Celiac

Lactose intolerant discovered August 2010

Hypothyroid Dx 2009. Sleep Apnea 2005

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Thanks for all the replys, thats what I need - real cooks who like to cook. I too was known for my pies and haven't baked anything since becoming a Celiac. I have done a few cookies. I have a wish list on Amazon so my kids can order from it. Today I ordered Robert's book and Cooking for Dummies. My daughter is having a baby around Thanksgiving and I will be living with her and her husband for several weeks to help out. I will do the cooking so I just couldn't wait to get a couple cookbooks. When I told my daughter I would be cooking Thanksgiving gluten free she asked me to try the recipes first. She is skeptical about gluten free tasting good. Now my only problem will be working in her kitchen and feeding her 18 month old and not getting CC myself. I am looking forward to it though.

Wow, working in her kitchen...are you bringing your own cooking things....cutting board, mixers, sifters, etc.?At least the things that are hardest to make sure are perfectly clean? Can you make any of the food in your kitchen & bring it frozen? That's what I'm going to try to do at my family's Thanksgiving. My father is making the turkey as he does every year, but I'm worried he'll "forget" that I've got a gluten intolerance and put flour on it somehow; he's done that before. I'm going to make gluten-free bread for the stuffing, and watch him like a hawk :ph34r: I'm also going to make the pumpkin pie, so that's another reason I need a perfect crust; my brother and father are both scientists and have pie making down to a fine science, so it'll have to pass their judgement.

I'm excited today to try the Vanilla Butter Layer Cake from Annalise's book. My co-worker's mom is also gluten intolerant, so I told her to come over and we'd bake her mom a cake for her birthday. Hope it turns out as well as the other two recipes!

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OK...I just bit the bullet and ordered "Gluten-Free Baking Classics" by Annalise Roberts. I did browse through the book and like that you can mix up smaller batches of flour. Of course, I cut some recipes in half anyway so that makes sense (especially breads that make two loaves and I only want to make one). And if I find one flour mixture I really like, then I can make up a larger batch.

Of course, while there I had to go for free shipping so took a couple of other things off my wish list including a French bread pan and English muffin rings. biggrin.gif

Also, I got an email this morning from Living Without and they have a 2010 Gluten-Free Holiday Guide, which I also ordered. $6.95 plus $2.00 shipping. http://www.livingwithout.com/products/


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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OK...I just bit the bullet and ordered "Gluten-Free Baking Classics" by Annalise Roberts. I did browse through the book and like that you can mix up smaller batches of flour. Of course, I cut some recipes in half anyway so that makes sense (especially breads that make two loaves and I only want to make one). And if I find one flour mixture I really like, then I can make up a larger batch.

Of course, while there I had to go for free shipping so took a couple of other things off my wish list including a French bread pan and English muffin rings. biggrin.gif

Also, I got an email this morning from Living Without and they have a 2010 Gluten-Free Holiday Guide, which I also ordered. $6.95 plus $2.00 shipping. http://www.livingwithout.com/products/

Hi, did you buy the french bread pan with all the little holes? Mine has them, and when I put the dough in the oven in the pan to rise, it went through the holes :( gluten-free dough is quite a bit softer than regular bread dough! The next time I made french bread, I just put foil over the pan, which worked, but is kind of a waste of the pan. Probably the best thing would be to let it rise on something else, and then bake it in the pan. I also put a pan of water in the oven while the bread was baking to give it a crispier crust, and took it out for the last 10 minutes of baking.

I want to make the english muffins, too! I don't have the rings, but I thought I could use my hamburger bun pan. I subscribe to Living Without, too, but they never email me dry.gif

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Hi, did you buy the french bread pan with all the little holes? Mine has them, and when I put the dough in the oven in the pan to rise, it went through the holes sad.gif gluten-free dough is quite a bit softer than regular bread dough! The next time I made french bread, I just put foil over the pan, which worked, but is kind of a waste of the pan. Probably the best thing would be to let it rise on something else, and then bake it in the pan. I also put a pan of water in the oven while the bread was baking to give it a crispier crust, and took it out for the last 10 minutes of baking.

I want to make the english muffins, too! I don't have the rings, but I thought I could use my hamburger bun pan. I subscribe to Living Without, too, but they never email me dry.gif

I can't tell if it has holes or not. I figure with gluten free dough, I'd probably end up lining it with parchment paper anyway. It's the "Nonstick French Bread/Baguette Pan - 16 x 8 Inch" by chefgadget. And of course, we know I can't link to it. I figure it'll help hold the shape of the dough. I may try the recipe I've used before that was posted in the Buying a Stand Mixer thread way back in April/May unless there's a good recipe in the new cookbook I ordered.

What kind of hamburger bun pan do you use? I haven't tried making them yet but was hoping my muffin top pan would work.

If I understand correctly, English muffins are made on top of the stove. The rings I bought are "Norpro English Muffin Rings Set of 4" (I bought two sets). Oh, and I also saw they had the doughnut pan someone mentioned the other day (I controlled myself and didn't order it...lol) I always go for free shipping so I may order it another time.

You can sign up for the free recipe of the week from Living Without. I'm assuming that's why I got the email letting me know about the holiday recipes. I also subscribe to the magazine and like it a lot.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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I can't tell if it has holes or not. I figure with gluten free dough, I'd probably end up lining it with parchment paper anyway. It's the "Nonstick French Bread/Baguette Pan - 16 x 8 Inch" by chefgadget. And of course, we know I can't link to it. I figure it'll help hold the shape of the dough. I may try the recipe I've used before that was posted in the Buying a Stand Mixer thread way back in April/May unless there's a good recipe in the new cookbook I ordered.

What kind of hamburger bun pan do you use? I haven't tried making them yet but was hoping my muffin top pan would work.

If I understand correctly, English muffins are made on top of the stove. The rings I bought are "Norpro English Muffin Rings Set of 4" (I bought two sets). Oh, and I also saw they had the doughnut pan someone mentioned the other day (I controlled myself and didn't order it...lol) I always go for free shipping so I may order it another time.

You can sign up for the free recipe of the week from Living Without. I'm assuming that's why I got the email letting me know about the holiday recipes. I also subscribe to the magazine and like it a lot.

I'm sure your muffin top pan would work-I think they're basically the same thing, just called something different. I ordered mine from amazon. I've seen recipes for English Muffins on the stovetop, but never made them. The recipe for English Muffins in Annalise's book goes in the oven in the hamburger bun pan. If you have a stovetop EM recipe that you're going to try, maybe you can make that one and I can make Annalise's, and we can compare notesbiggrin.gif

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The recipe for English Muffins in Annalise's book goes in the oven in the hamburger bun pan. If you have a stovetop EM recipe that you're going to try, maybe you can make that one and I can make Annalise's, and we can compare notesbiggrin.gif

biggrin.gifbiggrin.gifbiggrin.gif


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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I liked Roben Ryberg's books.

Have you made any breads from "You Won't Believe It's Gluten-Free"? I tried the Everyday Loaf (Corn-based) twice and absolutely bombed. I also tried Rolls (Potato-based) and they were also a failure. It's puzzling to think of using only a single flour or starch and have it turn out. After trying those one weekend, I have yet to try anything else.

I do have the "Gluten-Free Kitchen" and have had better results, which prompted me to order the other book. I know she also has a cookie book coming out in Nov., which I'm hesitant to order.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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Wow, working in her kitchen...are you bringing your own cooking things....cutting board, mixers, sifters, etc.?At least the things that are hardest to make sure are perfectly clean? Can you make any of the food in your kitchen & bring it frozen? That's what I'm going to try to do at my family's Thanksgiving. My father is making the turkey as he does every year, but I'm worried he'll "forget" that I've got a gluten intolerance and put flour on it somehow; he's done that before. I'm going to make gluten-free bread for the stuffing, and watch him like a hawk :ph34r: I'm also going to make the pumpkin pie, so that's another reason I need a perfect crust; my brother and father are both scientists and have pie making down to a fine science, so it'll have to pass their judgement.

I'm excited today to try the Vanilla Butter Layer Cake from Annalise's book. My co-worker's mom is also gluten intolerant, so I told her to come over and we'd bake her mom a cake for her birthday. Hope it turns out as well as the other two recipes!

I know it worries me. I am driving so I guess I could bring some of my own things. You can't get a mixer clean? If you have a good pie crust recipe let me know. I make pumpkin pie and pecan pie every year. I haven't decided what I will do about the stuffing.


Dx Celiac July 2010 by Endoscopy biopsy- had Endoscopy for another reason, not for possible Celiac

Lactose intolerant discovered August 2010

Hypothyroid Dx 2009. Sleep Apnea 2005

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Have you made any breads from "You Won't Believe It's Gluten-Free"? I tried the Everyday Loaf (Corn-based) twice and absolutely bombed. I also tried Rolls (Potato-based) and they were also a failure. It's puzzling to think of using only a single flour or starch and have it turn out. After trying those one weekend, I have yet to try anything else.

I do have the "Gluten-Free Kitchen" and have had better results, which prompted me to order the other book. I know she also has a cookie book coming out in Nov., which I'm hesitant to order.

I haven't made any of the loaf breads or the rolls; come to think of it I liked the "Gluten-Free Kitchen" better, too. I have made the biscuits (corn-based), and my family liked them. Especially good if you add garlic and cheddar cheese.

For regular loaf breads, I've been sticking to the Gluten-free Pantry's sandwich bread mix. Easy, and better than anything I've made from scratch so far.

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I haven't made any of the loaf breads or the rolls; come to think of it I liked the "Gluten-Free Kitchen" better, too. I have made the biscuits (corn-based), and my family liked them. Especially good if you add garlic and cheddar cheese.

For regular loaf breads, I've been sticking to the Gluten-free Pantry's sandwich bread mix. Easy, and better than anything I've made from scratch so far.

Thanks for your response! That's interesting. I'll have to try the biscuits. The recipes for breads are interesting in that some only call for a single flour or starch, which basically goes against anything I've ever learned about gluten free baking. And lots of egg whites and baking powder or baking soda but no yeast although in her first book she says the yeast is only there for flavor. So I'm puzzled but will give it another shot. I really feel I should try as recipe as written the first time around. I may email the author as I found her email addy in some of the review comments on Amazon.

It just seemed like the recipes for bread and rolls had way too much liquid. I probably should try one of the multi-grain bread recipes instead. I really bought the book for the baking recipes since I do know how to cook although I may try some of her other recipes later.

I've only tried one bread mix (Bob's Red Mill Wonderful Homemade Bread), which I didn't find very wonderful plus it was $5.99. I haven't seen Gluten Free Pantry mixes around here...at least not yet. So much for small towns.


Sylvia

Positive Celiac Blood Panel - Dec., 2009

Endoscopy with Positive Biopsy - April 9, 2010

Gluten Free - April 9, 2010

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