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jess_gf

The What's For Dinner Tonight Chat

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One word for an incredible dish - Jambalaya.

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acorn squash is planned for dinner... so yay!

Not enough food for a student's brain to work at top speed...you need some PROTEIN, kiddo..

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Testing my tyramine limits a little at a time. So tonight, chili! Perfect snowy weather dinner. Crossing my fingers for beans.

Fingers crossed for you, honey!

Beef filet roast

Sauteed mushrooms

Carrots & diced sweet potatoes --oven roasted with herbs and broth

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To others (no, not having them for dinner :P ) --- Paella and Cassoulet

What we did have last night was venison stew - secret ingredients cranberries and dollop of sour cream on top.

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One word for an incredible dish - Jambalaya.

one word for Jambalaya made by you---OUTRAGEOUSNODOUBT

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one word for Jambalaya made by you---OUTRAGEOUSNODOUBT

That.... is cheating!

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I'm just having chicken breast.

Planning on making an apple and cinnamon smoothie later... I'm so so hungry.

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I'm just having chicken breast.

... I'm so so hungry.

...because just chicken breast is not enough nutrition and you need to eat more, sweetie... IMHO

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That.... is cheating!

Maybesobutsowhat?. ;)

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Stir fried veg with shrimp and a beer. :) (Just one :D )

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...because just chicken breast is not enough nutrition and you need to eat more, sweetie... IMHO

There isn't much to eat today... I need to go to a far away supermarket after some of my stuff (cinnamon, almonds, brown sugar) and my father promissed me he would go with me and changed his mind so basically I have only meat, juice and fruit to eat. And dried bananas, but I had three of them today already, better not push my luck.

The smoothie was awful without cinnamon :( "Set it on fire" awful.

I will just make sweet potato chips because gladly there isn't white potatoes as well -- last night's dinner had to go without them -- so I can have one more dish with potatoes until the end of the week.

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Stir fried veg with shrimp and a beer. :) (Just one :D )

you go, girl...enjoy...what one did you go for? Green's dark? hubs says that one is the best

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Popcorn dinner with Bond....James Bond.

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scrambled eggs and chedder cheese on an organic brown rice wrap ,,,, ,my most favorite meal ( lately anyway :lol: )

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scrambled eggs and chedder cheese on an organic brown rice wrap ,,,, ,my most favorite meal ( lately anyway :lol: )

wow, ..Hi Chill!! so happy to see you! ;) and that sounds yum....!

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you go, girl...enjoy...what one did you go for? Green's dark? hubs says that one is the best

Haven't found Greens here yet. I drink New Grist. It's not bad I have found Nicklebrook and a Quebec one. Nicklebrook is VILE stuff IMHO. Quebec one is ok but expensive. New Grist is better.

Wine is my thing but I drank a whole bottle myself :wacko: last time so no more for a while.

I am having a salad now with my beer.

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Popcorn dinner with Bond....James Bond.

Lucky girl. On both counts.

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Not enough food for a student's brain to work at top speed...you need some PROTEIN, kiddo..

Lol, i raided the cheese and peanut butter earlier :)

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wow, ..Hi Chill!! so happy to see you! ;) and that sounds yum....!

Good to see you too Irish :D I have been around ,, just not posting often

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I picked up a ginormous bag of mini peppers at Costco. I'm thinking about making half of them into little baby stuffed pepper bites. I don't know what my husband will eat. He has a very serious aversion to vegetables. <_< Also making butter today, as I used up all I had last night on my arepas. (The beans are a no go for now, I woke up half blind. Oh well, who likes beans anyway.) Then I can use the buttermilk to make sour cream. I haven't had sour cream in sooooo long.

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Baking my first grain-free cake. And it's chocolate! So I will have a slice of that for dinner, plus peppermint tea, plus boiled carrots (ew, but a girl gotta eat).

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speaking of peppers...

Bison stuffed peppers (this primal eating is pretty good actually!)

and as an added bonus, the recipe calls for Ba-con!!!!

http://thepaleoplung...ll-peppers.html

Look, this girl has bacony hearts all over her blog site

I think I'm in love with her. I also think I need to make those apple bacon sweet potato cakes. I suppose any old flour will do since nuts make me blind. I don't have a scrap of bacon in this house. I guess I need to go shopping tomorrow.

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Baking my first grain-free cake. And it's chocolate! So I will have a slice of that for dinner, plus peppermint tea, plus boiled carrots (ew, but a girl gotta eat).

where's the protein? Cake for dinner or breakfast is OK once in awhile, but you consistently eat small amounts of foods and call it a meal. This isn't good for your health.

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Moroccan Roasted Chicken

Celeriac and Potato Puree with Scallions and Hazelnut Butter

Orange Cardamom Glazed Carrots

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  • Who's Online   4 Members, 1 Anonymous, 272 Guests (See full list)

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    Jefferson Adams
    Vanilla Apple Gratin (Gluten-Free)
    Celiac.com 10/20/2018 - All the flavor of vanilla ice cream melting into the warm orchard-fresh apple pie, but more quickly, with less sugar and fat? Yes, please! This easy to make dessert is a perfect substitute for cobbler, and much quicker and easier than pie.And yes, it tastes like vanilla ice cream melting into apple pie!
    Ingredients:
    5 Gala or Granny Smith apples (about 2½ pounds) 1 vanilla bean or 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste or vanilla extract 2 tablespoons butter ¼ cup whipping cream 3 egg yolks 2 tablespoons sugar ¼ cup sparkling wine, like Prosecco or cheap Champagne Salt Directions:
    Peel and core the apples. Cut each into 12 wedges. Set aside.
    Melt butter in a 12-inch broiler-safe skillet over medium-high heat. 
    Split the vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape the seeds into the skillet, and add the bean, as well. 
    Add apples; sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt. 
    Cook, stirring occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes or until apples are deeply golden and tender. 
    Remove vanilla bean.
    Meanwhile, heat broiler. In a medium bowl, whip cream to soft peaks. Keep chilled.
    Heat 1 inch of water in bottom of a double boiler; bring just to a simmer. 
    In top of double boiler, whisk together egg yolks, sugar and a pinch of salt; add wine and whisk continuously about 3 to 5 minutes until mixture is thickened and has doubled in volume. DO NOT BOIL!  
    Remove from heat; whisk 1 minute to set and put aside to cool. 
    Fold in whipped cream until just combined.
    Spoon cream mixture over apples in the skillet.
    Broil 4 to 5 inches from the heat for 1 to 2 minutes or until topping begins to turn golden. 
    Serve hot.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac Disease Research Could Lead to Diabetes Vaccine
    Celiac.com 10/19/2018 - Work to develop a vaccine for celiac disease could soon lead to a vaccine for diabetes.
    After successful phase 1 studies of Nexvax2, their peptide-based therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease, ImmusanT has seen a significant investment from venture philanthropy organization JDRF T1D. ImmusanT's peptide therapy program for celiac disease may provide lessons for a similar therapeutic treatment for Type 1 diabetes.
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    ImmusanT’s celiac peptide therapy program works by identifying antigens that trigger an inflammatory responses in people with autoimmune diseases. Once identified, the peptide therapy is used to neutralize the autoimmune response. This celiac disease program goes back to 1998, when Anderson first began his efforts to find and identify the peptides. 
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    This is really exciting news. A vaccine for celiac disease is exciting, to be sure, but a viable vaccine for diabetes would be a major development in disease prevention. Stay tuned for more news as the story develops. 
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    Jefferson Adams
    Human Leukocyte Antigen DQ2/DQ8 More Common in Women with History of Stillbirth
    Celiac.com 10/18/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the prevalence of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes, two common polymorphisms associate with celiac disease, in women who have had previous stillbirth, but who do not have celiac disease.
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    The team then conducted genetic tests for HLA DQ2/DQ8 on both groups, and compared patients data against controls. They found that 50% of women with history of unexplained term stillbirth tested positive for HLA‐DQ2 or DQ8, compared with just 29.5% for controls. Women with HLA DQ8 genotype showed a substantially higher risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.84 CI: 1.1840‐6.817).
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    The team found significantly higher rates of HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes in women with history of unexplained term stillbirth than in women with previous uneventful pregnancies.  Moreover, they found that HLA DQ2/DQ8 positivity was significantly associated with suboptimal fetal growth in intrauterine fetal death cases, as shown by an increased prevalence of SGA babies.
    This study will definitely be of interest to women with HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and to those who have experienced unexplained stillbirths. Stay tuned for more information on this important topic as news becomes available.
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    Jean Duane
    Surmounting Social Situations: Sabotage and Scrutiny Surrounding the Gluten-Free Diet
    Celiac.com 10/17/2018 - In the interviews I conducted last year, the Celiac.com viewers shared with me some disturbing stories about how others either sabotaged their gluten-free diet or how their gluten-free requirements are continually scrutinized and doubted. Here are a few examples:
    A co-worker at my office ate a gluten-containing burrito and thought it would be funny to cross-contaminate my work space.  With his gluten-coated hands, he touched my phone, desk, pencils, pens, etc. while I was not at my desk.  I came back and was contaminated.  I had to take several days off of work from being so sick. The waiter at a restaurant where I was eating dinner asked me if I was really “a celiac” or if I was avoiding gluten as a “fad dieter.” He told me the food was gluten-free when he served it, only to come up to me after I ate the dinner and admit there was “a little” gluten in it. My cleaning people were eating Lorna Doones (gluten-containing cookies) while cleaning my gluten-free kitchen, cross-contaminating literally everything in it. When I noticed I exclaimed, “I am allergic to gluten, please put your cookies in this plastic bag and wash your hands.”  They chided, “You have insulted our food.  We are hungry and we will eat anything we want to, when we want to.” At a family dinner, Aunt Suzie insisted that I try her special holiday fruit bread. In front of everyone around the table, she brushed off my protests and insisted that I over exaggerated my food sensitivities saying, “a little bit wouldn’t hurt you.”   These are but a few of an exhaustive list of situations that we regularly contend with. What can possibly be the rationale for any of this conduct?  I’m providing some recent headlines that may impact the attitudes of those we interact with and would like to hear what you think influence this behavior (see questions below). 
    Recently, the New York Times published an article entitled, “The Myth of Big, Bad Gluten.”  The title alone casts doubt on the severity of gluten exposure for those with CD (Myth, 2015)   In his political campaign, Senator Ted Cruz stated that if elected President, he would not provide gluten-free meals to the military, in order to direct spending toward combat fortification (Wellness, 2/18/16).  Business Insider.com called Tom Brady’s gluten, dairy free diet “insane” (Brady, 2017). Michael Pollen is quoted as saying that the gluten-free diet was “social contagion.” Further, he says, “There are a lot of people that hear from their friends, ‘I got off gluten and I sleep better, the sex is better, and I’m happier,’ and then they try it and they feel better too.  [It’s] the power of suggestion” (Pollan, 2014). Jimmy Kimmel said, “Some people can’t eat gluten for medical reasons… that I get. It annoys me, but that I get,” and proceeded to interview people following a gluten-free diet, asking them “what is gluten.” Most interviewed did not know what gluten is. (ABC News, 2018). Do headlines like this enable others to malign those of us making our dietary needs known?  Do these esteemed people talking about gluten cast doubt on what we need to survive? 
    Humans are highly influenced by others when it comes to social eating behavior. Higgs (2015) asserts that people follow “eating norms” (p. 39) in order to be liked. Roth, et al. (2000) found that people consumed similar amounts of food when eating together.  Batista and Lima (2013) discovered that people consumed more nutritious food when eating with strangers than when eating with familiar associates. These studies indicate that we are hypersensitive of what others think about what we eat. One can surmise that celebrity quips could also influence food-related behaviors. 
    Part of solving a social problem is identifying the root cause of it, so please weigh in by answering the following questions:  
    How do you handle scrutiny or sabotage of others toward your dietary requirements? Please speculate on what cultural, religious or media influences you suppose contribute to a rationalization for the sabotage and/or scrutiny from others when we state we are observing a gluten-free diet? Are people emulating something they heard in church, seen on TV, or read online?    We welcome your answers below.
    References:
    ABC. (2018). Retrived from https://abcnews.go.com/Health/video/jimmy-kimmel-asks-what-is-gluten-23655461  Batista, M. T., Lima. M. L. (2013). Who’s eating what with me? Indirect social influence on ambivalent food consumption. Psicologia: Reflexano e Critica, 26(1), 113-121.  Brady. (2017). Retrieved from https://www.businessinsider.com/tom-brady-gisele-bundchen-have-an-insane-diet-2017-2  Higgs, S. (2015). Social norms and their influence on eating behaviors. Appetite 86, 38-44. Myth. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/05/opinion/sunday/the-myth-of-big-bad-gluten.html  Pollan, M. (2014). Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/14/michael-pollan-gluten-free_n_5319357.html  Roth, D. A., Herman, C. P., Polivy, J., & Pliner, P. (2000). Self-presentational conflict in social eating situations: A normative perspective. Appetite, 26, 165-171. Wellness. (2016). Retrieved from  https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ted-cruz-gluten-free-military-political-corectness_us_56c606c3e4b08ffac127f09f

    Jefferson Adams
    Woman Calls Radio Show to Admit Lying About Gluten-Free Baked Goods
    Celiac.com 10/16/2018 - Apparently, local St. Louis radio station Z1077 hosts a show called “Dirty Little Secret.” Recently, a woman caller to the show drew ire from listeners after she claimed that she worked at a local bakery, and that she routinely lied to customers about the gluten-free status of baked goods.
    The woman said she often told customers that there was no gluten in baked goods that were not gluten-free, according to local tv station KTVI.
    Apparently the woman thought this was funny. However, for people who cannot eat gluten because they have celiac disease, telling people that food is gluten-free when it is not is about as funny as telling a diabetic that food is sugar-free when it is not. Now, of course, eating gluten is not as immediately dangerous for most celiacs as sugar is for diabetics, but the basic analogy holds.
    That’s because many people with celiac disease suffer horrible symptoms when they accidentally eat gluten, including extreme intestinal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and other problems. Some people experience more extreme reactions that leave them in emergency rooms.
    As part of a story on the “joke” segment, KTVI interviewed celiac sufferer Dana Smith, who found the punchline to be less than funny. “It’s absolutely dangerous, somebody could get very sick,” said Smith. 
    KTVI also interviewed at least one doctor, Dr. Reuben Aymerich of SSM St. Clare Hospital, who pointed out that, while celiac disease is “not like diabetes where you can reduce the amount of sugar intake and make up for it later, it’s thought you need to be 100 percent compliant if you can.”
    For her part, Smith sought to use the incident as a teaching moment. She alerted the folks at Z1077 and tried to point out how serious being gluten-free is for many people. Mary Michaels, owner of Gluten Free at Last Bakery in Maryville, Illinois, says it’s time people became more respectful.
    “I wouldn’t make fun of you if you had diabetes or a heart condition it’s kind of like that,” Michals said.
    We will likely never know if the radio station caller was telling the truth, or just putting listeners on. The Z1077 morning team did post a follow-up comment, which stated that they take celiac disease seriously, and that they did not intend to offend anyone. One host said his mom has celiac disease.
    It’s good to see a positive response from the radio station. Their prank was short-sighted, and the caller deserved to be called out on her poor behavior. Hopefully, they have learned their lesson and will avoid such foolishness in the future. Let us know your thoughts below.

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