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The What's For Dinner Tonight Chat

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Everyone Welcome - for the next round of Tiramisu - recipe and taste right - says the expert at the table this eve - lol - I was actually a bit more worried about how long to soak the lady fingers - directions were unclear just said make sure the center wasn't still crunchy - soooo next time I know - double dunk in coffee should be perfect.

What I served was more like a Tirami-pudding ;)

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One last check in before we go, just  to say:

 

 

and yaay for being a veteran and packing up a portable kitchen. This year was so simple compared to last year.

The traveling celiac? No problem!! LOL

 

! xxoo 

 

I have a plastic box that we just leave all the possible items I would want to travel with. I just have a big strong man get it down, and I can choose what I need. The Same big strong young man who bought me a grill spatula with a wooden handle and painted it red. I also have a plastic container with stuff for packing a lunch and extras. When you find a product you like, you got to buy extras. It has my freeze able lunch bags, salad containers, etc. I just traded the van in so I have to pack lighter!

 

Everyone Welcome - for the next round of Tiramisu - recipe and taste right - says the expert at the table this eve - lol - I was actually a bit more worried about how long to soak the lady fingers - directions were unclear just said make sure the center wasn't still crunchy - soooo next time I know - double dunk in coffee should be perfect.

What I served was more like a Tirami-pudding ;)

I have found many people willing to try my experimental desserts. To quote my parents " we'll try any dessert experiments!"

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We had to trade our van last year too, so I was double proud I did it ok on my first trip where I couldn't just throw everything in!! I don't miss the repair bill, but it was kinda cool just throwing the stroller in the back without even folding :-):-)

Still contemplating dinner, but survived rice pasta yesterday fine. Lost 20lbs since 2 Jan and feeling good. 55 or so to go...

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We're having pizza for our anniversary tonight. Nothing fancy or anything, we're just too much in love with pizza. :D He'll order out and I'll make my own. Well, sort of. I still have 2 Venice crusts in the freezer. Five years and I'm still madly in love and he's still hilarious. Don't tell him though, I keep the eyerolls coming to keep him on his toes with the jokes.

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We're having pizza for our anniversary tonight. Nothing fancy or anything, we're just too much in love with pizza. :D He'll order out and I'll make my own. Well, sort of. I still have 2 Venice crusts in the freezer. Five years and I'm still madly in love and he's still hilarious. Don't tell him though, I keep the eyerolls coming to keep him on his toes with the jokes.

 

Happy 5th Anniversary to you both!

 

Enjoy your pizza night   : )

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Addy, HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, sweets! xx

 

K, my portable kitchen was devised by reading your suggestions last year and adding the Koolatron.

Plus, I also found a cool collapsible colander. Less awkward to transport.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00886546000P?sid=IDx01192011x000001&kispla=00886546000P&srccode=cii_17588969&cpncode=30-121676474-2

So cool what they make now. 

 

 

Mindwarp! 20 lbs.--that's awesome, buddy. I'm over-the-moon for you. xx

 

Okay guys, we drove for 8 hours and we're in VA now. There is a Bonefish Grill across the street and this place GETS IT.

We were going to just heat up the stuffed peppers we brought, but it  seemed wrong not to take advantage of this safe gluten-free dining opportunity. 

 

I had:

 

Chilean sea bass with mango salsa

herbed rice

roasted asparagus

and then, I had the nerve to have some

creme brulee.

 

:)

I'll probably sleep like a log.  

 

Ski, all's well so far. Just a tad "ouchy" from the long car ride, but they have a hot tub in the hotel and I'm going to get in it right now. ;)

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IH, that sounds sooooo good :)

Turkey breast steak wrapped in prosciutto, with an egg, carrots and broccoli. Looking forward to the weekend, have a good one everyone

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I wouldn't have resisted creme brulee myself. It is a vacation after all.

 

Today was supposed to be my last day babysitting, as the little guy was starting at a daycare to get some social skills. He spent the day home instead. I have burnt myself out getting his stuff all packed up for his mom to pick up so instead of pizza leftover for lunch tomorrow, we're just having them tonight. If I get super ambitious, I'll reheat them in the oven instead of the microwave.

 

This is my last sleeping in weekend. Starting next Saturday I'm starting this food co-op thing that requires me to pick up my fruit/veggies at seven-o-freaking-clock in the morning. On a Saturday. It is practically criminal! And if I want to be a semi-decent human being and volunteer.... I have to show up an entire hour earlier. Who thinks up these times?!?! I just keep telling myself I'll save buttloads of money and I have nothing better to do. (except sleep)

 

So yes, bring on the weekend!

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Zipity Do Da!!!!!!!!!!

 

Yes, I consumed my first legume in 18 months - thus far (3 hours post consumption and I am fine) -- Shroomie you got your ears on?

 

I soaked and rinsed red lentils within an inch of their life for 48 hours -- added bone broth, garlic, ginger and onion for 45 mins -- then added good helping of salt, pepper and cilantro.

 

Dinner included some other stuff -- oh ya steak and asparagus....but, but, but I ate a lentil.....can you feel the happy dance - and this is with only one glass of Zin --- going to pour another and keep dancing :)

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I had bean with bacon soup.  Made a big pot of it on Monday but starting to get a tad sick of it by now.  Still have another serving.  Too bad daughter doesn't like it.

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I think I just heard a squeal of delight over here in my hotel in Georgia. Was it the sound of victory over 'da lentils? :lol:

 

I had white beans in a white chili last night that we brought with us, so I see your lentil and raise you a white bean.

 

Lisa, this is how we reclaim our lives--one stinkin legume at a time! :) 

 

So excited for you, sweets ---- and I just danced around the lobby.

J sends a  Whoohoo to you too! xx

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Happy Dance continues this morning -- it is a double legume happy dance...can't believe how happy my red lentils and Irish's white beans have made me :)

 

Dinner tonight will be more lentils and some meat and some vegies.

 

Haven't had chocolate mousse type substance in awhile -- big batch of that too.

 

and dear sister delivered three pounds of bacon for me to turn into RBJ -- house is going to smell yummy today!

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Last night we had - Dali chicken, Pepper steak, Schezuan Beef, fried rice, & egg drop soup.  It was M's 17th Birthday and we went to Pf Changs!  They even brought him a little gluten-free flourless choclate cake with a candle.

 

Not sure what we are eating tonight.  Too much snow left to grill outside.  :angry:

 

 

You ladies with the beans - Take it easy there!  Hate to see you overindulge!  You got a designated driver?  :D

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WoooHooo, Lisa-gal.  Way to GO!!!!  So happy for you.  Now don't go overdoin' them lentils, restrain yourself!!!!  The way to keep 'em is by giving them away ^_^   Jig-a-jig-jig!!!!  :D

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Legumetastic news there ski!

I had roast chicken, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots, mangetout and ...my 1st white potato this year! That was 2 hours ago, so we''ll see if I am a zombie tomorrow. It was baked and crispy and soft and fluffy.

Gaining things back really makes you appreciate the simple things.

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We're having pizza for our anniversary tonight. Nothing fancy or anything, we're just too much in love with pizza. :D He'll order out and I'll make my own. Well, sort of. I still have 2 Venice crusts in the freezer. Five years and I'm still madly in love and he's still hilarious. Don't tell him though, I keep the eyerolls coming to keep him on his toes with the jokes.

happy anniversary!!  :)

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I think we will have calzones with spinach and a soft cheese like Boursin if I see it. And a " regular" Chebe focaccia moz & feta pizza.

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Bacon, egg and cheese on Udi's bagel for the girlies and I tonight:)

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WoooHooo, Lisa-gal.  Way to GO!!!!  So happy for you.  Now don't go overdoin' them lentils, restrain yourself!!!!  The way to keep 'em is by giving them away ^_^   Jig-a-jig-jig!!!!  :D

 

 

I still feel great...but there has been a bit of gas -- wow just realizing how little gas has been generated the way i have been eating the past year or so...I don't miss it and I'm sure my honey has not missed it...limiting my little lentil friends to once a week or so ;)

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Lentils sound yummy! I haven't had any in a while, I think I'll make a lentil loaf this week. Glad that you can have them. And now you have a weapon of war too. :lol: Thanks for the idea.

 

It isn't just getting back foods, but celiac in general makes you appreciate the little things. Every little food. Every little activity. Every last win and victory we have. Every day there is a reason to celebrate. :D

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Everyone wanna reason to celebrate? Well, everyone that can tolerate eggs, dairy, and tapioca flour

that is..... Sorry. :ph34r: 

 

 

I took Addy's cheese bread and fried it in a pan like crepes. CAN YOU SAY TORTILLAS? For

softer results, use very low heat and cover the pan. For crispy, crunchy, taco-shell-like deliciousness

turn it up a little and fry uncovered. I added salt, pepper, garlic powder, and a little basil (not sure why

just felt right lol) I ate the first few as they came out of the pan... You can make them tiny like an egg or

huge like the size of my big deep-sided fry pan. They turn beautifully once the bottom has crisped up.

Having the last big one I made with sunnyside eggs on it right now. Oh, and I made it with romano

cheese and was far too lazy to mix it up in a blender, I just mixed it in my pyrex glass thing with the

spout with a spoon. I used olive oil spray to grease the pan, no sticking at all in my stainless.

 

Addy is my hero.

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Frying them? That is brilliant!!! OMG I know what's for breakfast.

 

Oh, and I'll bet any old milk type thing and fake cheese would work for people who are into that sort of thing.

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Woohoo, I am not a zombie this morning, white potatoes are back in :)

Mind you, withover 50lbs still to lose, not too often. I have worked out that I need more carbs in the few days before my period, so that will make it a bit easier.

Yes Addy, everything is appreciated more. I am thankful I can now wallk regularly, and have the energy to play with my little ones :)

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Bunny Yay!

I can't eat them yet, but my sons will be extremely happy to try them...so thanks to you and Addie - I've been making crepes as substitute flour tortillas - they are alright but am excited too hear of another option!

And yes this flipping disease does make us appreciate everything - painless steps are my favorite which is close to a tie with finding out I might finally get a few foods back after four years of continually losing foods!

Lentils may have made me a bit tired as most legumes do, but I did have a very restful sleep - early here so I'm going to dream up a nice Sunday dinner for my family - Dad joining us twice a week since Mom's in the hospital - thinking Santa Maria Style TriTip - possibly with quesadillas and a bluberry cheesecake :)

 

Edited to add....Today is the fourth anniversary of the day I first learned the words Celiac Disease and Tissue Transglutaminase IgA....wow what a ride it has been -- off to walk six miles in celebration :D

Edited by GottaSki

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    Alexander R. Shikhman, MD, PhD, FACR
    The Connection between Gluten Intolerance and Sjogren’s Syndrome
    Celiac.com 08/17/2018 - Mucosal dryness is among the top non-gastrointestinal complaints of patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease.
    Prolonged eye dryness, itching and chronic inflammation of the eye lids (blepharitis), mouth dryness, excessive thirst, frequent yeast infections, skin dryness and vaginal dryness in women may represent clinical symptoms of Sjogren’s syndrome. Named after Swedish ophthalmologist Henrik Sjögren, Sjogren’s syndrome is one the most common (and one of the most commonly underdiagnosed) rheumatic/autoimmune diseases. The disease most frequently affects women (10 women for every man) and usually appears in women around and after menopause. However, the disease can affect either gender at any age.
    In addition to mucosal and skin dryness, Sjogren’s syndrome can cause joint pain and stiffness, damage to peripheral nerves leading to numbness and tingling of fingers and toes, fatigue, brain fog, inflammation of blood vessels, hair loss, poor food digestion due to pancreatic damage and various problems with the cardiac muscle and its conduction system causing arrythmia and myocarditis. Patients suffering from Sjogren’s syndrome quite frequently deal with recurring yeast infections, chronic periodontal disease, recurring canker sores and poor dental health.
    The diagnosis of Sjogren’s syndrome is based on:
    Demonstration of mucosal dryness upon physical examination Specific blood tests (positive anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies, elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin G) Ultrasound imaging of salivary glands On rare occasions, a diagnosis of Sjogren’s syndrome requires confirmation through a small salivary gland biopsy or special nuclear medicine studies.
    It is well documented that patients with gluten intolerance and celiac disease have an increased risk of Sjogren’s syndrome. Similarly, patients with Sjogren’s syndrome are characterized by the increased prevalence of gluten intolerance and celiac disease.
    The connection between Sjogren’s syndrome and gluten intolerance is not a coincidental one: there are well-studied molecular mechanisms explaining this link. In the late 1980s/early 1990s genetic studies in Sjogren’s patients demonstrated an increased presence of the class II major histocompatibility complex protein HLA DQ2. Furthermore, HLA DQ2 positivity was found to be associated with increased titers of Sjogren’s specific anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The link between gluten and Sjogren’s syndrome became obvious in the mid to late 1990s when it was discovered that HLA-DQ2 binds to deamidated gluten peptides and presents them to mucosal CD4+ T cells thus initiating a chain of events eventually leading to autoimmune responses.
    The second set of data came from the discovery of BM180 protein. This protein regulates tear secretion in the lacrimal acinar cells. Suprisingly, amino acid sequence of BM180 has a similarity with alpha-gliadin and, therefore, can attract inflammatory cells activated by gluten thus contributing to the development of eye dryness.
    The actual prevalence of gluten intolerance in Sjogren’s patients based on published data varies from 20% to 40% depending on the criteria used to define gluten intolerance. The data from our clinic (Institute for Specialized Medicine) indicate that gluten intolerance can affect almost half of patients with Sjogren’s syndrome. Additionally, our data show that one third of patients with gluten intolerance have evidence of mucosal dryness and Sjogren’s syndrome.
    The frequency of documented celiac disease in patients with Sjogren’s syndrome is in the vicinity of 5%.
    The following is a patient case history from our clinic:
    A 28 year old woman was seen in our clinic due to her complaints of long-standing irritable bowel syndrome and recent onset of eye dryness. Her initial presentation included abdominal pain, bloating and irregular bowel movements. She was seen by several gastroenterologists and underwent several upper endoscopies and colonoscopies with mucosal biopsies which were non-diagnostic. Her lab test results showed positive IgG anti-gliadin antibodies and she was told that “this is a common finding among healthy people, and is not indicative of any illnesses.” She was seen by her ophthalmologist and prescribed with contact lenses which she could not wear due to significant eye discomfort and irritation. Further eye examination showed that she had diminished tear production and was referred to our clinic to rule out Sjogren’s syndrome. Upon physical examination in our clinic the patient not only demonstrated profound eye dryness but also showed evidence of dry mouth, fissured tongue and patchy areas of thrush as well as very dry skin. A sonographic evaluation of her major salivary glands was suspicious for moderately advanced Sjogren’s syndrome. Her laboratory test results showed: positive anti-SSA/Ro antibodies, elevated serum immunoglobulin G, low neutrophil count as well as low levels of vitamin D and ferritin (a serum marker of iron storage state). Also, the patient was found to have positive serum IgG and salivary IgA anti-gliadin antibodies as well as positive HLA DQ2 (a molecular marker associated with gluten intolerance).
    Based on a combination of clinical history, physical findings and laboratory test results, the patient was diagnosed with gluten intolerance and Sjogren’s syndrome. In addition to the aforementioned tests, the patient underwent food intolerance testing based on serum IgG4 antibodies which showed not only gluten but also cow’s casein intolerance. Her treatment options included a traditional route of therapy based on drugs or an integrative approach based on dietary modifications and food supplements. She opted for the integrative approach and started a gluten-free and dairy-free diet as well as iron glycinate, vitamin D, specific probiotics and digestive enzymes.
    After the first month on the diet and supplements, she reported a remarkable improvement of her irritable bowel symptoms and in three months, she started noticing an improvement of the dryness. Laboratory tests performed six months after initiation of the therapy showed normalization of the IgG level, disappearance of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and a slightly suppressed neutrophil count. Through following the prescribed diet and supplements she is now symptom free.
    Why do we need to treat Sjogren’s syndrome? Left untreated, Sjogren’s syndrome can cause debilitating dryness affecting gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Clinically, this manifests as difficulty in swallowing solid foods, heartburn, malabsorption of nutrients and minerals, bloating, weight loss, chronic sinus infections and prolonged dry cough. Sjogren’s syndrome also significantly increases the risk for malignancies affecting lymphatic nodules, known as lymphomas.
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    Cyclosporin (brand name Restasis) eye drops and artificial tears for dry eyes. Numoisyn lozenges and liquid, as well as Caphosol for mouth dryness and mucositis. Cevimeline (brand name Evoxac) and pilocarpine (brand name Salagen) for systemic dryness therapy. Treatment of autoimmune disturbances:
    Hydroxychloroquin (brand name Plaquenil). Leflunomide (brand name Arava). Severe autoimmune conditions associated with Sjogren’s syndrome are treated with the biologic drug rituximab (brand name Rituxan). Integrative therapy for Sjogren’s syndrome. Ear acupuncture (auricular therapy) and body acupuncture to stimulate tear and saliva production. Elimination diet based on individual food-intolerance profiles. Oral probiotics (for example, BLIS K12) and intestinal probiotics. Digestive enzymes. Fish and krill oils. Black currant seed oil. Cordyceps sinensis in combination with wormwood extract to treat the autoimmune component of Sjogren’s syndrome. Zinc and elderberry lozenges. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione. Our extensive clinical experience demonstrate that early cases of Sjogren’s syndrome can be completely reversed (by both clinical and laboratory criteria) by the strict gluten-free and elimination diet. The advanced cases cannot be reversed; however, even in advanced cases the gluten-free and elimination diet can slow the progression of the disease.
    If you’re concerned that dryness may represent Sjogren’s syndrome, see a rheumatologist for further evaluation and management of your condition.
    References:
    Alvarez-Celorio MD, Angeles-Angeles A, Kraus A. Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome and Celiac Disease: Causal Association or Serendipity? J Clin Rheumatol. 2000 Aug;6(4):194-7. Asrani AC, Lumsden AJ, Kumar R, Laurie GW. Gene cloning of BM180, a lacrimal gland enriched basement membrane protein with a role in stimulated secretion. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1998;438:49-54. Feuerstein J. Reversal of premature ovarian failure in a patient with Sjögren syndrome using an elimination diet protocol. J Altern Complement Med. 2010 Jul;16(7):807-9. Iltanen S, Collin P, Korpela M, Holm K, Partanen J, Polvi A, Mäki M. Celiac disease and markers of celiac disease latency in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 1999 Apr;94(4):1042-6. Lemon S, Imbesi S., Shikhman A.R. Salivary gland imaging in Sjogren’s syndrome. Future Rheumatology, 2007 2(1):83-92. Roblin X, Helluwaert F, Bonaz B. Celiac disease must be evaluated in patients with Sjögren syndrome. Arch Intern Med. 2004 Nov 22;164(21):2387. Teppo AM, Maury CP. Antibodies to gliadin, gluten and reticulin glycoprotein in rheumatic diseases: elevated levels in Sjögren’s syndrome. Clin Exp Immunol. 1984 Jul;57(1):73-8.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can a Gluten-Free Diet Normalize Vitamin D Levels for Celiac Patients?
    Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature.
    Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. 
    Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. 
    Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. 
    Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation.
    Source:
    Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Could Gluten-Free Food Be Hurting Your Dog?
    Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. 
    The disease in question is called canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and often results in congestive heart failure. DCM is historically common in large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers, though it is also affects some Cocker Spaniels.  Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. These reported atypical DCM cases included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, a Whippet, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds. 
    As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. The good news is that in cases where the dog suffers no genetic component, and the disease is caught early, simple veterinary treatment and dietary change may improve heart function.
    According to Nutritional Outlook, an industry publication for makers of dietary supplements and healthy foods and beverages, there is a growing market for “free from” foods for dogs, especially gluten-free and grain-free formulations. In 2017, about one in five dog foods launched was gluten-free. So, do dogs really need to eat grain-free or gluten-free food? Probably not, according to PetMD, which notes that many pet owners are simply projecting their own food biases when choosing dog food.
    Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. 
    So, the take away here seems to be that most dogs don’t need grain-free or gluten-free food, and that it might actually be bad for the dog, not good, as the owner might imagine.
    Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make.
    Read more at Bizjournals.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Did You Miss the Gluten-Free Fireworks This Past Fourth of July?
    Celiac.com 08/14/2018 - Occasionally, Celiac.com learns of an amusing gluten-free story after the fact. Such is the case of the “Gluten-Free Fireworks.” 
    We recently learned about a funny little event that happened leading up to Fourth of July celebrations in the town of Springdale in Northwest Arkansas. It seems that a sign advertising "Gluten Free Fireworks" popped up near a fireworks stand on interstate 49 in Springdale. 
    In case you missed the recent dose of Fourth of July humor, in an effort to attract customers and provide a bit of holiday levity, Pinnacle Fireworks put up a sign advertising "gluten-free fireworks.” 
    The small company is owned by Adam Keeley and his father. "A lot of the people that come in want to crack a joke right along with you," Keeley said. "Every now and then, you will get someone that comes in and says so fireworks are supposed to be gluten-free right? Have I been buying fireworks that have gluten? So then I say no, no they are gluten-free. It's just a little fun."
    Keeley said that their stand saw a steady flow of customers in the week leading up to the Fourth. In addition to selling “gluten-free” fireworks, each fireworks package sold by Pinnacle features a QR code. The code can be scanned with a smartphone. The link leads to a video showing what the fireworks look like.
    We at Celiac.com hope you and your family had a safe, enjoyable, and, yes, gluten-free Fourth of July. Stay tuned for more on gluten-free fireworks and other zany, tongue-in-cheek stories.
    Read more at kark.com
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Stress-Related Disorders Associated with Higher Risk for Autoimmune Disease
    Celiac.com 08/13/2018 - It’s not uncommon for people to have psychiatric reactions to stressful life events, and these reactions may trigger some immune dysfunction. Researchers don’t yet know whether such reactions increase overall risk of autoimmune disease.
    Are psychiatric reactions induced by trauma or other life stressors associated with subsequent risk of autoimmune disease? Are stress-related disorders significantly associated with risk of subsequent autoimmune disease?
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether there is an association between stress-related disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease. The research team included Huan Song, MD, PhD; Fang Fang, MD, PhD; Gunnar Tomasson, MD, PhD; Filip K. Arnberg, PhD; David Mataix-Cols, PhD; Lorena Fernández de la Cruz, PhD; Catarina Almqvist, MD, PhD; Katja Fall, MD, PhD; Unnur A. Valdimarsdóttir, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Center of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland; the National Centre for Disaster Psychiatry, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; the Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; the Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; the Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; the Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; the Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; and the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
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    Source:
    JAMA. 2018;319(23):2388-2400. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.7028