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Staceyshoe

How To Approach Dr About Testing

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I would really like to get a blood panel for celiac done on my oldest. He odes have "the" celiac gene and has had some type of digestive issues all his life. His symptoms now are fairly mild and he does not have the stereotypical diarrhea. I emailed the pediatrician asking for a celiac panel on him since there is a family history. (I didn't mention that he has already had genetic testing and carries the gene.) He wrote back that he feels the test is unnecessary unless he's having symptoms and that we should have an office visit if he is having symptoms. I am the type of person who consults a dr as a last resort, not someone who runs to them for every little thing. But when I need their help, I want them to treat me a patient who doesn't come for every little thing.

How should I approach him? Should I bring in the genetic results? Should I try to educate him about some celiacs being aymptomatic, or would that alienate him? Should I print off something from an AMA-type website (if so, what?)? Should I just tell him that it would put my mind at ease to rule out celiac and just to please run the test regardless of symptoms?

Please help! Ds is on gluten now, so I'd like to get the bloodwork over with and then do a gluten-free trial. How do you get dr cooperation?


Son (age 4)- severe IgE allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, dairy and mild soy allergy, neg for celiac gene

Son (age 7)- positive for celiac gene, history of digestive problems, IGA deficient, scope on 4/15/11 was negative, failed gluten challenge

My celiac panel was negative

Husband still needs to be tested

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Try giving him this:

http://www.celiacdisease.net/assets/pdf/CDCFactSheetsGeneticScreening4.pdf

When an individual is diagnosed with celiac disease, the entire family learns that they must be tested for the condition, for they are now at risk. First degree relatives (parent, child, sibling) have a 1 in 22 chance of developing celiac disease in their lifetimes; in second degree relatives, (aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent) the risk is 1 in 39. A simple genetic test can determine if further screening is needed or completely rule out the possibility of developing the disease. If the genetic test shows positive for celiac disease, the individual should have antibody screening regularly to help determine if the disease is active.


 

 

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Thank you sooooooooooooo much for posting this. I am having blood work done tomorrow, and today I took my list into the GP's office.

Nurse came out stating that she saw no need for any gluten-related testing of any sort, plus, their office did not have that capability. BUT, a lab nearby *would be* able to perform the test if I could justify the reason.

Well, I have my reasons, I won't go into here. Inflammation is SUCH an issue for me, and several doctors have said they believe I have the gluten allergy/gene.

Can't wait to take this with me tomorrow.

Much thanks for the ammo. Love this forum !!!

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