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norahsmommy

Spices You Have Found To Have Gluten...

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I have never in my ten+ years found a spice which had gluten in it.

Seasoning mixes (including such things as curry powder and chili powder) with gluten are out there. But spices are usually single-ingredient products containing only the named spice. When spices appears in an ingredient list, it can not hide any grain product whether a gluten grain or not.

Mrs. Dash is a seasoning mix, not a spice. AFAIK, their products are all gluten-free. Some do contain non-spice ingredients such as tomato, lemon and onion.

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McCormick's single ingredient spices are all safe. Here's some recent info on Mccormicks: http://www.gfreefoodie.com/are-mccormick-spices-gluten-free/

The main thing to think about is if you have old spices in your cabinet and have ever in the past dipped a measuring spoon in them that has been coated with flour dust from using it on the flour before measuring the spice, then the spice may be cc'd. The same thing goes if you have an old container of sugar and ever used the same measuring cups while baking, or just had the sugar container open while you measuered flour--flour dust can go up in the air and then settle in things.

While I have not seen any single spices and herbs with gluten I have seen a few dried herbs that say they "may contain wheat" or are "manufactured in a facility with wheat". In most cases this a CYA statement from the company and may not be a problem. I do grow a few of my own herbs however and dry them. It's so nice to have fresh herbs on hand to make gluten free foods tasty. Not to mention I save money by growing/drying them myself.

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1. Spice mixtures can sometimes contain gluten - you know, like 'taco seasoning' or 'poultry seasoning' type of things. So those you want to check on.

2. The majority of spices have no gluten ingredients added, so if that's usually good for you, you're golden. However, the majority of spices are processed in the same facilities that are making the spice mixtures that DO contain gluten, so they can get CC. That seems to be more of a hit or miss type of thing, though. I've been hit often enough that I started growing my own herbs. However, my father (less sensitive) has never had a problem with pure spices ever, that I know of.

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1. Spice mixtures can sometimes contain gluten - you know, like 'taco seasoning' or 'poultry seasoning' type of things. So those you want to check on.

As I said, "seasoning" can contain hidden gluten. "Spices" can not. Read the ingredients carefully.

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Generally speaking the worry about seasonings is overblown. Yes, a handful of seasoning blends (NOT spices, as Peter points out) do have gluten, but at least in the U.S. the gluten always comes from wheat and it's always listed.

richard

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As I said, "seasoning" can contain hidden gluten. "Spices" can not. Read the ingredients carefully.

But it's not the ingredients that are the problem with pure spices, it's the CC that's a potential issue. So while reading the ingredient list is useful in finding out ingredients, not so much on the CC front.

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On 12/20/2010 at 0:21 PM, jerseyangel said:

Exactly!

"Many of Adams spice products are naturally gluten free. Adams does produce items that contain wheat in the spice manufacturing facility, as well as uses equipment that processes both allergens and non-allergens.

However, Adams does follow a strict Cleaning & Sanitation Procedure, as well as Allergen Segregation Practices and Allergen Scheduling to ensure that all allergens such as wheat/gluten will not be cross-contaminated.

By using these practices, it is unlikely that cross-contamination of wheat or other allergens in unacceptable levels will occur, though it is possible"

http://www.adamsextract.com/gluten.asp

I know this is an old post, but I'm having issues with, I believe, Adams spices.  

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49 minutes ago, SirGluten said:

Spicely Organics tested positive for me.  It was chili powder.

You should not condem a product based on  "home testing".  The NIMA and the gluten strips are not exact science.  They should be used (if you are even going to use them) as a simple tool.  Better to read labels and verify with the manufacturer.   This certified gluten free brand has been tested by an independent laboratory and was below 10 ppm.  Spices can be difficult to measure for gluten so special handling is required.  I do not think you were able to do this in your home lab.  

Could your reaction be related to chilis?  I can not eat them.  Just an intolerance for me.  I react to the capsaicinoids (chemical in peppers) except for green/bell peppers which do not have capsaicnoids.  Want to test?  Eat fresh chili peppers and see if you react.  

Of course,  mistakes can be made at ANY company.  If you are concerned, try sticking to Whole fresh foods that you wash and prepare yourself.  

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1 hour ago, SirGluten said:

Spicely Organics tested positive for me.  It was chili powder.

I have contacted my friend who is their sales manager, she forwarded the lot no. you gave to the quality assurance team for testing, they have yet to issue a recall so I do not think it was anything on their end. I went and bought a 1lb bag off amazon and tested it personally and came back negative, I even tried eating a few tsp in a overly seasoned omelette to see if it would trigger a reaction and I got nothing. 

I do have a question, when you tested it in your test kit did you use a spoon, to remove it from the container? I am willing to bet whatever you used to collect your sample was contaminated.   I use little 8-12mg lab scoops for sampling stuff in a home test kit and dispose of them after, I end up testing the insides of supplements spices etc often where you have to measure them like so mix into a paste in little disposable sample vial then scoop into the test kit to get a viable sample and accurate reading. -_- I have a bit of OCD and am paranoid about gluten.

I do not mean to call you a liar but I made this same mistake with Upton Jack Fruit and sorta blew it out of proportion relying on a home test kit alone. I sent it off to a lab in Virginia to get Tested and it came back negative and later tracked the culprit down to something else in my house that I used used the same spoon to handle and it made me sick and contaminated my test.  I am a oldy at this and even I made that mistake I tend to keep quiet now on brand Flops til I am more sure it is the issue so I do no shame them or make myself out to be idiot/ass

IF you want to follow up, get another unopened package from that SAME LOT from where you got that one and go to http://www.biadiagnostics.com/services.html  

They can do the testing for gluten OFFICIALLY and then you can file a complaint with the FDA and the Company if it comes back positive.

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Hey, I used an EZ gluten test.  I did it three times, and I did it because it made me sick when I ate my chili.  I tested all the other ingredients, and they came up negative.  Some pretty expensive chili, across all dimensions of expense, all in all.

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I tested the spice islands (?) Chili powder with my nima tester after i got extremely sick the first time i made chili... it tested positivr, twice.  I have a completely gluten free kitchen and home, so there is no "spoon cross contamination," which is a novel idea and possible issue for mixed households. I was diagnosed celiac in 2007,  and because i must take it very seriously, i very rarely eat out, i read labels, websites, and contact companies.  I have been very pleased with the nima tester, and would trust it over a mass produced, designed-and-printed- long-ago-for-a-product-manufactured-and-handled-by-hundreds-of-mistake-possible (not perfect) humans- label any day. Twice. I tested every spice after that, and the chili powder had gluten in it.

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We are pretty new to the Gluten Free world, but here’s what I have experienced so far:

I found gluten-free seasoning packets by McCormick at Stater Bros.  I use the Turkey Gravy, Brown Gravy, Taco & Chili Seasonings.  They are all very good.

I discovered that McCormick Grill Mates Brown Sugar Bourbon contains malted barley. Thank 

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The "Texas Style Smoked Ribs Low n' Slow Rub" from Adams (adamsextract.com) is gluten-free per my phone conversation with Mr. Glover at Adams. He said that if an Adams product is NOT gluten-free, the label would indicate a "wheat allergen" warning. 

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On 9/18/2018 at 10:31 AM, KarenSJ said:

The "Texas Style Smoked Ribs Low n' Slow Rub" from Adams (adamsextract.com) is gluten-free per my phone conversation with Mr. Glover at Adams. He said that if an Adams product is NOT gluten-free, the label would indicate a "wheat allergen" warning. 

Thank you! I couldn’t find info about this on the website. 

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