Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

CathyG

Question About Gluten Free Products

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I've only been on this diet for a couple of days and have a question about what you consider to be really gluten free.

A number of products such as cornflakes will state that they do not contain wheat but are made on machinery that may have been used to manufacture wheat products - knowing this, do you still eat cornflakes?

Having to shop in the health food isle is fine, but it is alot more expensive, so if it's possible to eat things like cornflakes or rice bubbles or other products that are not made from wheat or gluten but not necessarily processed according to gluten free guidelines would be easier for me (but only if the risk is worth taking).

Has anyone here had any reactions when they've eaten food with these sorts of labels on them?

Thanks

Cathy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most mainstream cereal products contain gluten as an intentional ingredient in the form of malted barley. Before worrying about shared facilities, check the ingredient list for malt, malt flavor, malt extract or anything else with the WORD malt (not words containing the letters M-A-L-T).

Do not be misled by maltodextrin and maltose--they are gluten-free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only been on this diet for a couple of days and have a question about what you consider to be really gluten free.

A number of products such as cornflakes will state that they do not contain wheat but are made on machinery that may have been used to manufacture wheat products - knowing this, do you still eat cornflakes?

Having to shop in the health food isle is fine, but it is alot more expensive, so if it's possible to eat things like cornflakes or rice bubbles or other products that are not made from wheat or gluten but not necessarily processed according to gluten free guidelines would be easier for me (but only if the risk is worth taking).

Has anyone here had any reactions when they've eaten food with these sorts of labels on them?

Thanks

Cathy

Exceptions to the "most mainstream cereals" are SOME cereals made by General Mills in the "CHEX" series. Corn, Rice, Cinnamon, Chocolate Chex are all gluten free and the boxes are marked as such.

But Peter's post about the MALT word is correct. Malt flavoring, barley malt, etc are made from barley. And almost all Kelloggs cereals have it in them.

As for the CC issues with products that say "made in a facility that also makes..........." it is pretty much an individual thing. Some people are more sensitive than others. I generally don't have a problem with products made in the same facility as wheat, barley products. But my level of sensitivity is relatively low compared to many people. I keep "Glutenease" capsules in my purse. At Christmas, my SIL made both gluten-free Chex Mix and regular glutened Chex Mix. I accidentally grabbed two small handfulls of the regular stuff and ate it before I noticed. I panicked , took 2 Glutenease and was ok stomach-wise. But I did get a minor DH rash several days later (I get DH mainly), but now I also get the big D sometimes from glutening.

SO, it's up to you to do trial and error with the products made in a facility with gluten products.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cocoa, fruity and maybe sprinkles ( not sure the flavor) Pebbles are now coming out marked gluten-free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It greatly depends on your sensitivity level, how safe these are for you.

I have members of my family who don't pay attention to the 'processed with wheat' label, and they are fine. Others of my family, however, react to lower levels, so paying attention to that label at least makes the risk lower.

Where you'll fall in that category is just something you'll discover as you get through this. There seem to be two schools of thought on how to do it. Start with the least restrictive and then take out more if you're still sick. Or start with the most restrictive, and add things in until you hit something that has too much gluten for you.

We chose the latter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally feel better if I minimize processed foods. I'll be doing great for a couple months, then suddenly I will have a weird reaction to something that was made on "shared machinery" or in a "shared facility". Over my six years gluten-free, I've had oddball reactions to potato chips, corn chips, nuts, mainstream cereals, frozen foods, and even occasional reactions to name-brand gluten-free processed foods that are supposed to be below 20 ppm gluten. I never know for sure if it's gluten, but the reaction has been to foods that don't usually bother me. I avoid the expense and oddball reactions by eating mostly home-cooked foods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally agree with T.H. ans Skylark - It does depend on how sensitive you are to gluten.

I do avoid processed foods a lot. And I too mostly stick with home-cooked meals. I make a lot of food when I make dinners & then I freeze it. My home-made frozen meals are great when I don't have time to cook. I feel so much better so it's definitely worth it.

I can't eat most of the "gluten free" cereals. The only one I can eat is Glutino -Honey & Nut cereal. All the others I get reactions with them. That's including Enjoy Life brand and even some other Glutino cereals -Corn Flakes. I guess I'm just really sensitive, but I've learned how to adapt - I'll eat warm brown rice with milk or silk almond milk with fresh fruit, Cream of Buckwheat cereal with fresh fruit (really good!)and milk or some scrambled eggs.

Right now I'm trying to find a good gluten free vitamin. I've had a lot of problems with them & even my blood work antibodies would not go down until I stopped taking them. I got glutened from some supposedly "gluten free" vitamins- Country Life, Member's Mark and Megafoods. You really got to watch them.

Good Luck!

Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never had a problem with the "shared" stuff. I just carefully look for "wheat, barely, rye, malt". Anything else I consider OK. I eat Corn Chex every morning. For some reason the Honey Chex don't aggree with my stomach, but it's very mild, and not a gluten thing.

best regards, lm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found it's an individual thing. I have reacted every time to products made on shared equipment. Sometimes not right away, but after eating it several times in a row.

I do use a few mainstream products by companies I trust to be good about labeling, but I mostly stick to naturally gluten-free foods and cook from scratch--cheating a little by using some Gluten free Pantry mixes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
Wow!  I had cold urticaria (hives) when growing up.  Actually my whole life.  Amazing, it resolved after my celiac disease diagnosis.   Luckily, I live in Sunny Southern California.  It made for a hard time skiing, but I did it anyway.  Swimming in the Pacific Ocean triggered it too.  Even an ice cube on my skin caused.  Girls were required to wear dresses to school back back in the day, but I was exempted because of those hives.   When glutened though I now get chronic autoimmune urticaria
  • Blog Entries

  • ×
    ×
    • Create New...