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Booseebean

What If I Ignore It?

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What would happen if I just continue to eat the way I do? Or if I dont totally remove gluten from my diet? Feeling like more & more of my life is now being majorly restricted is enough to make me crack. Is there a step process that I can follow? My doctor said to just evaluate what I eat & leave it out or make substitutions but are there any steps to get into this new lifestyle? Help...

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Well if you ignore your diagnosis you could end up with a signature like mine or worse. Ignoring it increases your chances of developing cancer and could rob you of your brain. I was a long time to diagnosis and could barely walk or talk by the time I was diagnosed to say nothing of the daily agony of the constant D.

The gluten free lifestyle does take some getting used to. If you start with whole unprocessed foods it is easier. Even if your not an accomplished cook many things are really easy to make like chili and stews and soups. It is not hard to throw a piece of chicken in the oven along with a baked potato or a steak or burger on the stove with a salad or some veggies.

I do know how hard it is at first but in the long run you and your loved ones will be happy you stuck to it. Since this disease can also effect our mental health ignoring risks you a awful lot. We are here to help in any way we can.

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

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If you enjoy being sick and getting sicker sure just keep eating gluten.

Really it's not that hard to eliminate from your diet? Why stress out about it, do it and you'll feel better. If you really don't know much about food, diet, ingredients of food, what contains gluten or not and your totally lost, contact a nutritionist or dietician or some one along those lines familiar with Celiac. If you don't want to do that, keep reading as much as you can and inform yourself calm down and do it. Every thing you need for a better gluten free lifestyle is a search away....

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If you enjoy being sick and getting sicker sure just keep eating gluten.

Really it's not that hard to eliminate from your diet? Why stress out about it, do it and you'll feel better. If you really don't know much about food, diet, ingredients of food, what contains gluten or not and your totally lost, contact a nutritionist or dietician or some one along those lines familiar with Celiac. If you don't want to do that, keep reading as much as you can and inform yourself calm down and do it. Every thing you need for a better gluten free lifestyle is a search away....

Did seeing a dietician work for you? Being diabetic was easy cause carbs are required to be listed on all food labels but gluten is not listed. So did talking to the dietician really help you get a good idea of what is good & what is bad?

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

Yes sensitivity varies huge from person to person. It's not the immediate effects of being glutened that are a major concern if you are not that sensitive, it's the long term negative effects on your body, it's BAD for you! It does not have to cost any more. No you do not have to consume gluten to correct low blood sugar.

Knowledge is key, read read read inform your self. Or as I stated earlier seek the advice of professionals if your over whelmed. Good Luck- it's not really that big of a deal on becoming educated on your new diet and you'll be healthier.

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.

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Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.

I like this! A great way to sum it up, I feel. I recently replied to a woman who claimed that her husband and young son are celiac, but if they happen to eat "just a little" they don't have any problems with it. So she feels they have a minor case of celiac. She truly believes since they are not symptomatic, there is no reason to be careful, especially with cross contamination. She equates the absence of serious symptoms to the level, or degree, of the disease. "Since they don't get real sick with a little gluten, I don't really worry about it"

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Wouldnt there be a sensitivity factor that would vary person to person? So if I can eat a little bit with no discomfort or pain wouldnt it be ok to consume just a little? I am a single mother so I cant afford to eat completely gluten free & being diabetic there will be times when I may have to consume gluten to correct a severe low blood sugar.

If you are celiac, you risk other autoimmune diseases and intestinal cancer if you continue to consume gluten, no matter whether you notice it or not. If you are gluten-intolerant, the risks of consuming gluten are less well known, but it's still not a good plan.

Gluten-free does not have to be expensive. If you have money problems, make rice, beans, potatoes, and corn your staples. Add cheeses, veggies and meats as you find them on sale.

PM Peter, one of the moderators. He is type 1 diabetic and celiac and can explain how to correct a severe low blood sugar without ever consuming gluten. After all, it's sugar you need, not gluten.

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Did seeing a dietician work for you? Being diabetic was easy cause carbs are required to be listed on all food labels but gluten is not listed. So did talking to the dietician really help you get a good idea of what is good & what is bad?

I did not see one. I have always been very aware and knowledgable of what I eat from a health side of things. When I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease I spent a a solid month almost day and night searching and learning every thing I could from the WWW and bought a few books, and magazines. I still continuously read about it. I'll admit I was already on a rather low carb diet and eliminating gluten for me was not a very dramatic thing. My health improved almost the day I stopped eating gluten, I'm quite happy not eating things that make me feel bad. I also love to cook and I'm a total 'foody.' There is nothing I really miss form my strict Celiac Diet.

The leaky roof analogy above is a so on point. Black mould - Cancer or other nasty health issues.

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PM Peter, one of the moderators. He is type 1 diabetic and celiac and can explain how to correct a severe low blood sugar without ever consuming gluten. After all, it's sugar you need, not gluten.

She did, and I have sent her a brief reply.

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Hi, Bean, and welcome!

I have been a type one diabetic for almost my entire life, and was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, with celiac disease five years ago. I was asymptomatic -- a "silent' celiac, if you will. So it was extremely difficult to justify the introduction of another hugely restrictive diet upon myself, on top of all the restrictions of the diabetic diet. Hey, there's no pain, no diarrhea, no migraines nor joint pain.. . . ....why DO this to myself??

Well, I started reading. A lot of my research brought me back here to c.com, a fantastic source of information and support. I realized that I had to give up ALL gluten. 'Twas difficult with no horrific symptoms to keep me away from it, but the alternative is very possible intestinal cancer and other autoimmune diseases. Once I knew this, it got easier.

Here is another vital thing: the diabetic diet and the gluten-free diet combine very, very well. We diabetics need to restrict carbs, and gluten is found in grains.. . .... ...carbohydrates. So we are already partway there. My blood sugars have been tightly controlled for many years, but my AICs have been the best in my life since going gluten-free. Eliminating this protein from your diet can tighten your blood sugars up, no question.

There is quite a learning curve at first with the gluten-free diet, but it really does become second nature. And insulin reactions don't ever have to involve gluten - - I always carry glucose tablets with me, and at home I have fruit and/or honey.

There are quite a few diabetic celiacs on this forum. You're far from alone, and we're here to help! :)

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She did, and I have sent her a brief reply.

Great! I'm so glad you two connected. I didn't want to say something wrong about diabetes. Fortunately I haven't needed to manage that particular health condition.

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Eating a little gluten, even if you don't feel it, is still damaging. It's like a leaky roof on your house. Sometimes it leaks and it obviously raining on your head. Thats an obvious effect of the gluten. Sometimes, your roof leaks but the water drips down inside the walls on the wooden studs. It can go on this way for months until one day - black mold is growing on your walls & the shsower tile falls off. You now have lots of damage inside the walls that wasn't showing.

That was one of the most helpful, honest, & easy to understand things I've heard thus far & it really helped. I wish my doctor was as gifted with words. Thank you soo much!

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Hi, Bean, and welcome!

I have been a type one diabetic for almost my entire life, and was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, with celiac disease five years ago. I was asymptomatic -- a "silent' celiac, if you will. So it was extremely difficult to justify the introduction of another hugely restrictive diet upon myself, on top of all the restrictions of the diabetic diet. Hey, there's no pain, no diarrhea, no migraines nor joint pain.. . . ....why DO this to myself??

Well, I started reading. A lot of my research brought me back here to c.com, a fantastic source of information and support. I realized that I had to give up ALL gluten. 'Twas difficult with no horrific symptoms to keep me away from it, but the alternative is very possible intestinal cancer and other autoimmune diseases. Once I knew this, it got easier.

Here is another vital thing: the diabetic diet and the gluten-free diet combine very, very well. We diabetics need to restrict carbs, and gluten is found in grains.. . .... ...carbohydrates. So we are already partway there. My blood sugars have been tightly controlled for many years, but my AICs have been the best in my life since going gluten-free. Eliminating this protein from your diet can tighten your blood sugars up, no question.

There is quite a learning curve at first with the gluten-free diet, but it really does become second nature. And insulin reactions don't ever have to involve gluten - - I always carry glucose tablets with me, and at home I have fruit and/or honey.

There are quite a few diabetic celiacs on this forum. You're far from alone, and we're here to help! :)

Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

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Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

Why a long slow road? It's your choice but here is a list: (Research and or get help don't eat these things be healthy!) http://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsafe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Unsafe-Ingredients/Page1.html

Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)

Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)

Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Atta Flour

Barley Grass (can contain seeds)

Barley Hordeum vulgare

Barley Malt

Beer (most contain barley or wheat)

Bleached Flour

Bran

bread Flour

Brewer's Yeast

Brown Flour

Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)

Bulgur Wheat

Cereal Binding

Chilton

Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)

Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

cookie Crumbs

Cookie Dough

Cookie Dough Pieces

Couscous

Criped Rice

Dinkle (Spelt)

Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate

Durum wheat (Triticum durum)

Edible Coatings

Edible Films

Edible Starch

Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)

Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)

Enriched Bleached Flour

Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour

Enriched Flour

Farina

Farina Graham

Farro

Filler

Flour (normally this is wheat)

Fu (dried wheat gluten)

Germ

Graham Flour

Granary Flour

Groats (barley, wheat)

Hard Wheat

Heeng

Hing

Hordeum Vulgare Extract

Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol

Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch

Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Kamut (pasta wheat)

Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)

Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)

Kluski Pasta

Maida (Indian wheat flour)

Malt

Malted Barley Flour

Malted Milk

Malt Extract

Malt Syrup

Malt Flavoring

Malt Vinegar

Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Matza

Matzah

Matzo

Matzo Semolina

Meringue

Meripro 711

Mir

Nishasta

Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)

Orzo Pasta

Pasta

Pearl Barley

Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)

Perungayam

Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)

Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)

Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)

Roux

Rusk

Rye

Seitan

Semolina

Semolina Triticum

Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Small Spelt

Spirits (Specific Types)

Spelt (Triticum spelta)

Sprouted Wheat or Barley

Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Strong Flour

Suet in Packets

Tabbouleh

Tabouli

Teriyaki Sauce

Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)

Triticale X triticosecale

Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids

Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract

Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil

Udon (wheat noodles)

Unbleached Flour

Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Vital Wheat Gluten

Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum

Wheat amino acids

Wheat Bran Extract

Wheat, Bulgur

Wheat Durum Triticum

Wheat Germ Extract

Wheat Germ Glycerides

Wheat Germ Oil

Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)

Wheat Nuts

Wheat Protein

Wheat Triticum aestivum

Wheat Triticum Monococcum

Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract

Whole-meal Flour

Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)

Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

Artificial Color4

baking powder4

Caramel Color1, 3

Caramel Flavoring1, 3

Clarifying Agents4

Coloring4

Dextrins1,7

Dextrimaltose1,7

Dry Roasted Nuts4

Emulsifiers4

enzymes4

Fat Replacer4

Flavoring6

food Starch1, 4

Food Starch Modified1, 4

Glucose Syrup4

Gravy Cubes4

Ground Spices4

HPP4

HVP4

Hydrolyzed Plant Protein4

Hydrolyzed Protein4

Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein4

Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate4

Hydroxypropylated Starch4

Maltose4

Miso4

Mixed Tocopherols4

Modified Food Starch1, 4

Modified Starch1, 4

Natural Flavoring6

Natural Flavors6

Natural Juices4

Non-dairy Creamer4

Pregelatinized Starch4

Protein Hydrolysates4

Seafood Analogs4

Seasonings4

Sirimi4

Smoke Flavoring4

Soba Noodles4

Soy Sauce4

Soy Sauce Solids4

Sphingolipids4

Stabilizers4

Starch1, 4

Stock Cubes4

Suet4

Tocopherols4

Vegetable Broth4

Vegetable Gum4

Vegetable Protein4

Vegetable Starch4

vitamins4

Wheat Starch5

1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.

3) The problem with caramel color is it may or may not contain gluten depending on how it is manufactured. In the USA caramel color must conform with the FDA standard of identity from 21CFR CH.1. This statute says: the color additive caramel is the dark-brown liquid or solid material resulting from the carefully controlled heat treatment of the following food-grade carbohydrates: Dextrose (corn sugar), invert sugar, lactose (milk sugar), malt syrup (usually from barley malt), molasses (from cane), starch hydrolysates and fractions thereof (can include wheat), sucrose (cane or beet). Also, acids, alkalis and salts are listed as additives which may be employed to assist the caramelization process.

4) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.

5) Most celiac organizations in the USA and Canada do not believe that wheat starch is safe for celiacs. In Europe, however, Codex Alimentarius Quality wheat starch is considered acceptable in the celiac diet by most doctors and celiac organizations. This is a higher quality of wheat starch than is generally available in the USA or Canada.

6) According to 21 C.F.R. S 101,22(a)(3): [t]he terns natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional.

7) Dextrin is an incompletely hydrolyzed starch. It is prepared by dry heating corn, waxy maize, waxy milo, potato, arrowroot, WHEAT, rice, tapioca, or sago starches, or by dry heating the starches after: (1) Treatment with safe and suitable alkalis, acids, or pH control agents and (2) drying the acid or alkali treated starch. (1) Therefore, unless you know the source, you must avoid dextrin.

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Jen, I sent you a reply in our conversation.

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Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

But so well worth the effort :D

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I'm so glad you stopped in for the support. I don't post or read very often, but my co-workers were toasting bread and I needed some moral support, even though my brain knows that eating regular bread will make me nauseous within a very short time and uncomfortable in the longer term. I am really sensitive and react very quickly to gluten...that has been a huge help for me.

But despite that I resonated with your post. Changing eating habits is really hard, especially when the effects of the way you eat are not immediately evident. And even for those of us that do have the immediate effects, there is a mourning period. The best piece I read about mourning and celiac was in the Gluten Free Bible. Awesome chapter on paying attention to those feelings.

But, as everyone says, the long term consequences are frightening if you keep eating gluten. I was diagnosed rather quickly (within 2 years of onset of symptoms), and I saw the effects of eliminating gluten within a month. But I now can remember one of my great-aunts who sort of withered away. The tale was that she just laid down and waited to die. But my family now tells me she wasn't supposed to eat wheat, and I think she'd had a lifetime of asymptomatic celiac disease. That is not the future I want to see myself in.

Keep coming back and looking for cooking resources. Modifying recipes in cookbooks can be really fun, and I'm learning how to be really positively assertive when I plan to eat out. As for snacks...when I get glutened, I get bouts of hypoglycemia. I'm not diabetic, though. Having roasted peanuts (if you can eat them), or trailmix (making it yourself is fun), is always helpful during those times.

Peace!

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P.S. Always plan for longer in grocery shopping and bring a small magnifying glass (I have one I got for free that's actually plastic). Manufacturers are required to list wheat, but you are right that they don't list the other things and it is always good to read the label.

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I so agree with spinsterwitch. The mourning section in The Gluten Free Bible made me cry buckets and helped so much with the loss of old favorite foods.

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Thanks so much for your story. It does make it soo much harder for me to want to do what I am supposed to without a constant nagging of stomach pain & discomfort to remind me to not do that. I am already picky about food so I know it will be a loooong slow road to getting this new diet down pat.

You can concentrate on meat and veggies instead of carbs and have a good gluten-free diet. Meat proteins are slow to digest and provide long lasting energy for your body vs carbs. Think of the Mediterannean diet or the paleo diet as guides. A lot of people with celiac follow the SCD (specific carbohydrate) diet or a version of it.

But basically keep away from processed foods in boxes etc and make your own foods from whole ingredients. Remove or limit the grains. You can learn and get used to it just like you learn anything else. A whole foods diet also gets you away from preservatives and food colorings etc.

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You can concentrate on meat and veggies instead of carbs and have a good gluten-free diet. Meat proteins are slow to digest and provide long lasting energy for your body vs carbs. Think of the Mediterannean diet or the paleo diet as guides. A lot of people with celiac follow the SCD (specific carbohydrate) diet or a version of it.

But basically keep away from processed foods in boxes etc and make your own foods from whole ingredients. Remove or limit the grains. You can learn and get used to it just like you learn anything else. A whole foods diet also gets you away from preservatives and food colorings etc.

I have major issues with quick drops in my sugar levels & am also working on raising money for a diabetic service dog for help with my lows so I am always needing to keep my sugar as stable as possible & need to be able to get it up quickly & keep it up. Does that make sense?

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I remember the early days after diagnosis and the emotions that went with the diagnosis. I'll admit it isn't easy at first and I did the same thing you did and tried to bargain with myself and my diet. Visiting this website and reseaching journal articles educated me and gave me the resiliance to be strict about the diet. It was a slow journey for me and I consider myself still to be healing, but it has been so worth it to have my health back. When people tell me that my diet must be so hard, I tell them it is easier than being sick and I really do mean it.

As far as the expense of a gluten-free diet:

1) With some creativity, you can manage a very healthy diet that is still low cost and high in taste. Check out the recipe forum on this website.

2) I spend about 50% of what I used to spend at the doctor's and pharmacists because I'm healthier now.

3) I'm able to work again and not have constant sick days from migraines, constant colds, and overwhelming fatigue.

4) I never ate out before going gluten-free, but lots of people save money by getting rid of that restaraunt/takeout expense.

Between returning to work full time and saving on medical expenses I've more than offset the expenses of my optional indulgences in gluten-free cakes and cookies. I've also been able to accomplish a handful of life goals that celiac had stolen from me.

Best wishes on your transition to gluten-free and keep checking in for support.

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I have major issues with quick drops in my sugar levels & am also working on raising money for a diabetic service dog for help with my lows so I am always needing to keep my sugar as stable as possible & need to be able to get it up quickly & keep it up. Does that make sense?

Have you tried some fruit or a piece of candy followed by a protein like a nut butter? Gluten foods aren't the only way to raise you levels quickly. Also once you heal a bit on the diet that in itself may help with the BS regulation. Has your doctor referred you to a diabetes educator? They can sometimes be helpful. Also if you are on a med talk to your doctor about your difficulty with control, you may need a different med or an adjustment in your dosage.

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    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2018 - There have been numerous reports that olmesartan, aka Benicar, seems to trigger sprue‐like enteropathy in many patients, but so far, studies have produced mixed results, and there really hasn’t been a rigorous study of the issue. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether olmesartan is associated with a higher rate of enteropathy compared with other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).
    The research team included Y.‐H. Dong; Y. Jin; TN Tsacogianis; M He; PH Hsieh; and JJ Gagne. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA; the Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Science at National Yang‐Ming University in Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Hepato‐Gastroenterology, Chi Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan.
    To get solid data on the issue, the team conducted a cohort study among ARB initiators in 5 US claims databases covering numerous health insurers. They used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for enteropathy‐related outcomes, including celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy. In all, they found nearly two million eligible patients. 
    They then assessed those patients and compared the results for olmesartan initiators to initiators of other ARBs after propensity score (PS) matching. They found unadjusted incidence rates of 0.82, 1.41, 1.66 and 29.20 per 1,000 person‐years for celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy respectively. 
    After PS matching comparing olmesartan to other ARBs, hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% CI, 1.05‐1.40), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88‐1.13), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10‐1.36) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01‐1.07) for each outcome. Patients aged 65 years and older showed greater hazard ratios for celiac disease, as did patients receiving treatment for more than 1 year, and patients receiving higher cumulative olmesartan doses.
    This is the first comprehensive multi‐database study to document a higher rate of enteropathy in olmesartan initiators as compared to initiators of other ARBs, though absolute rates were low for both groups.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/12/2018 - A life-long gluten-free diet is the only proven treatment for celiac disease. However, current methods for assessing gluten-free diet compliance are lack the sensitivity to detect occasional dietary transgressions that may cause gut mucosal damage. So, basically, there’s currently no good way to tell if celiac patients are suffering gut damage from low-level gluten contamination.
    A team of researchers recently set out to develop a method to determine gluten intake and monitor gluten-free dietary compliance in patients with celiac disease, and to determine its correlation with mucosal damage. The research team included ML Moreno, Á Cebolla, A Muñoz-Suano, C Carrillo-Carrion, I Comino, Á Pizarro, F León, A Rodríguez-Herrera, and C Sousa. They are variously affiliated with Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain; Unidad Clínica de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain; Celimmune, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; and the Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Instituto Hispalense de Pediatría, Sevilla, Spain.
    For their study, the team collected urine samples from 76 healthy subjects and 58 patients with celiac disease subjected to different gluten dietary conditions. To quantify gluten immunogenic peptides in solid-phase extracted urines, the team used a lateral flow test (LFT) with the highly sensitive and specific G12 monoclonal antibody for the most dominant GIPs and an LFT reader. 
    They detected GIPs in concentrated urines from healthy individuals previously subjected to gluten-free diet as early as 4-6 h after single gluten intake, and for 1-2 days afterward. The urine test showed gluten ingestion in about 50% of patients. Biopsy analysis showed that nearly 9 out of 10 celiac patients with no villous atrophy had no detectable GIP in urine, while all patients with quantifiable GIP in urine showed signs of gut damage.
    The ability to use GIP in urine to reveal gluten consumption will likely help lead to new and non-invasive methods for monitoring gluten-free diet compliance. The test is sensitive, specific and simple enough for clinical monitoring of celiac patients, as well as for basic and clinical research applications including drug development.
    Source:
    Gut. 2017 Feb;66(2):250-257.  doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310148.