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Does Tylenol For Kids Contain Gluten?

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I was just thinking about common medications for kids (Tylenol, Advil, antibiotics...). Does anybody know if these brands have gluten in them (in Canada). What about antibiotics? Should I be telling our pharmacist about our daughter's diagnosis?

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I was just thinking about common medications for kids (Tylenol, Advil, antibiotics...). Does anybody know if these brands have gluten in them (in Canada). What about antibiotics? Should I be telling our pharmacist about our daughter's diagnosis?

Yes, you should inform the pharmacist.

http://www.glutenfreedrugs.com/Tylenol_Products.pdf

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Definitely tell your pharmacist.

Last time I asked, the Tylenol Chewables/Liquid were Gluten free. I would also recommend calling the manufacturer. They will be able to give you the best info. I cut and keep the labels of the ones I know are gluten-free. Since they don't get used daily like food does, I don't always remember which ones I have checked or not checked.

Good Luck!

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I was just thinking about common medications for kids (Tylenol, Advil, antibiotics...). Does anybody know if these brands have gluten in them (in Canada). What about antibiotics? Should I be telling our pharmacist about our daughter's diagnosis?

I was told about this site by my Pharmacist. Hope it helps

http://www.glutenfreedrugs.com/

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Very few meds actually have gluten but, as others have said, the pharmacist should know.

richard

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Very few meds actually have gluten but, as others have said, the pharmacist should know.

richard

As I understand it, meds that contain alcohol (like Niquil) frequently have gluten. In the US, they're really hard labels to understand as well.

Two summers ago, I spent several days calling companies of all the stuff I had in my medicine cabinet. Now keep in mind, that was TWO YEARS AGO, so it's time to call again. But here's what I found for my youngster...

gluten-free:



  • Liquid Tylenol and Children's Tylenol Meltaways Bubble-gum Flavored or Grape
  • Triaminic Daytime and Nightime Liquid Formulas
  • Tums Chewable
  • Children's Liquid Claratin
  • GAS-X
  • Burt's Bees Lip Balm
  • Kiss My Face Lip Balm
  • Badger Balm

Not gluten-free or could not verify gluten-free:



  • Vicks Formula 44
  • Niquil
  • Benadril
  • Bean-o
  • Dramamine (but we have used it with no ill effects--it may be one of those companies that's afraid to say yea or nay for fear of law suits)
  • Chapstick

Remember, though, my news is two years old. Things may have changed for some of those companies. I plan to do another call-around this summer, when I have some time off. If anybody knows of a change in any of these products, please post a comment and correct me! Thanks!

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I was just thinking about common medications for kids (Tylenol, Advil, antibiotics...). Does anybody know if these brands have gluten in them (in Canada). What about antibiotics? Should I be telling our pharmacist about our daughter's diagnosis?

I always mention my daughter's diagnosis with our pharmacist. And I'm adamant that we not purchase drugs/medicines until gluten-free status can be verified. It's funny, too, because we always have to remind medical doctors as well. They've sometimes prescribed meds that had gluten--then we reminded them, and they went, "Oh yeah. Right. I guess I need to call and see if that's gluten-free first."

It's funny how easily people forget what they're dealing with, even in the medical community. So be vocal about your child's diagnosis. Remind, reiterate, and refuse to walk away until people call to confirm the gluten-free status of prescriptions.

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So many insurance companies require the substitution of generic drugs, and the gluten-free status of the generics is very problematic. Often the drug companies themselves who manufacture the drugs do not know if there is any gluten because they purchase ingredients from other suppliers/countries who do not tell the manufacturer about the ingredients. So if the pharmacy where you are having the prescription filled cannot guarantee the gluten free status of the generic, it may be necessary to have your doctor check "no substitution" on the prescription if the brand name is gluten free. This may cost more in copayment but is worth it to get something that is gluten free.

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