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Toaster Oven With gluten-free Cooking?

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I just found out I have celiac and need to overhaul the kitchen. It's time for a new toaster.

I currently have a traditional toaster but have heard good things about toaster ovens. Is there anything I can even make in one that's gluten-free though? If all I will be doing is toasting bread, I'll save the counter space and go with a regular toaster.

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I make a mean grilled cheese sandwich in the toaster oven at work... I wouldn't suggest using one to make cookies. Tried that on a whim with my roommate. Very messy cleanup.

If you're just cooking for one, though, I imagine it would be quite good for roasting veggies--potatoes, carrots, asparagus, zucchini, etc.--quickly, and doing small portions of frozen foods, maybe baking a single-serving casserole dish, mac 'n' cheese...

It's my understanding that the toaster oven can do just about everything a normal oven can do. Just, you know, smaller.

I could be wrong though. The baking experiment *so* did not work out for me, and I'm a good baker with a normal oven!

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Fish, chicken, pizza, oh my! You can do all sorts of things, and it can save on energy and cook faster because they are so small. I have one that I love, and wouldn't be without it. You can also find them with a toasting slot in the top, just for traditional toasting. I've had those as well. But you can bake cookies, main dishes, side dishes, french fries, etc.

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And they don't heat up the house so much (not important now, but later :ph34r: )

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I like them because I can toast gluten toast for my son, the crumbs drop down and I can get the rack clean for my bread. For me it doesn't cross-contaminate. Perhaps it would be dangerous for others more sensitive.

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I resisted my hubby's suggestion for a toaster oven years ago (long before Celiac was part of our life). We bought one about a year and half ago and I LOVE IT! I think it would be good for gluten-free or not gluten-free, but I particularly like it for our gluten-free world. I use it for:

gluten-free cookies - as you know, gluten-free cookies have a short shelf life. I made cookie dough and freeze balls of it. Then I just bake what we'll eat in one sitting in the toaster oven. This helps me avoid eating too many cookies "just because they won't last long"!

Chicken tenders and nuggets for 1 or 2 people. Also, I can fit a single serving of nuggets and fries in ours. This makes it easier to make a hot lunch for my son when he wants. The regular oven takes so much longer to heat up, costs more to run, and heats up the house in the summer.

Baking gluten-free bagels - We eat a lot of Joan's gluten-free bagels and they bake up nicely in the toaster oven.

Tuna melts on gluten-free English muffins. You can make them in the regular oven, but it's a lot of wasted energy and heat for the short amount of time they need to bake.

Reheating pizza

Oh, yeah, and TOAST! :D

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I make a mean grilled cheese sandwich in the toaster oven at work... I wouldn't suggest using one to make cookies. Tried that on a whim with my roommate. Very messy cleanup.

If you're just cooking for one, though, I imagine it would be quite good for roasting veggies--potatoes, carrots, asparagus, zucchini, etc.--quickly, and doing small portions of frozen foods, maybe baking a single-serving casserole dish, mac 'n' cheese...

It's my understanding that the toaster oven can do just about everything a normal oven can do. Just, you know, smaller.

I could be wrong though. The baking experiment *so* did not work out for me, and I'm a good baker with a normal oven!

Whilst toaster ovens sure are convenient for many things, they definitely do NOT replace an oven. Think of many techniques such as braising, roasting standing rib roast or chicken, or oven-searing many cuts of meat. But you're right - they do have their purpose. :P As you mentioned, they are very good for roasting small batches of veg or baked potatoes, or hasselback potatoes. Even small souffles can do well.

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Perfect! I'll look into them. Can anybody recommend a good brand. I don't need too many bells and whistles, just something that works. Plus, I don't have lots of time to research them because I'm a little overwhelmed with all I have to replace in my diet, kitchen, etc.

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Hamilton Beach.

I was in the store several years ago, and some women came in the toaster oven area and were discussing all the brands that had flunked out on them one by one, after a year, and finally the one woman says, get that one, I've had it and it lasts.

At that point I'm all ears, and ask which one they are referring to, and it was that one.

It's a little slower to heat up than the ancient one I was using that was then about 20 + years old, but at least it was clean. And it has lasted longer than a year.

The advantage of slower is that it is harder to burn the gluten free toast this way.

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I have a countertop, convection oven, and I love it. I call it my little nuclear oven. It's my second one (I accidentally broke one of the quartz tubes on the first one). I don

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Speaking of toast, has anyone tried the toast bags you slip a piece of bread or bagel into to toast in a glutenized toaster/toaster oven? They are really cool. They come in a set of four and each bag is good for 50 uses. The reason I bought them is to take them with me when I travel as my husband and I stay in B&Bs. They are also good for use at family meals or other peoples' homes. So, I will still be able to safely have my toast. :)

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I have a countertop, convection oven, and I love it. I call it my little nuclear oven. It's my second one (I accidentally broke one of the quartz tubes on the first one). I don

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