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Blocking Interleukin-15 May Treat Celiac Disease Symptoms - Celiac.com

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Blocking Interleukin-15 May Treat Celiac Disease Symptoms

Celiac.com

New study on blocking Interleukin-15 to treat celiac disease symptoms Celiac.com 03/18/2011 - By blocking an inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15), doctors may be able to treat and prevent symptoms of celiac disease in some people, ...

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Wow, a way for mice to eat gluten! :D:) Sounds interesting, definitely worth watching for more info on this. Thanks for the post Scott!

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The biological anti TNF drugs that they are already marketing for auto immune arthritis have so many potential bad side effects as documented on PubMed and NIH (see how I added the disclaimer), tend to wear off in effect after awhile, and are so expensive, if they were marketed the same way, it would only be another complete validation for the efficacy of the gluten free diet. :)

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The biological anti TNF drugs that they are already marketing for auto immune arthritis have so many potential bad side effects as documented on PubMed and NIH (see how I added the disclaimer), tend to wear off in effect after awhile, and are so expensive, if they were marketed the same way, it would only be another complete validation for the efficacy of the gluten free diet. :)

Except that some of us on the gluten-free diet still have to use the TNF-inhibitors. :(

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That is an interesting connection between Vitamin A retinoic acid causing more inflammation when they thought it would be anti-inflammatory. This may speak to why Accutane (retinoic acid derivative of vitamin A) is now being implicated in "causing" intestinal disorders like Chron's, Celiac and IBS.

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Yes, and I'm not saying that you shouldn't use whatever medications you have available, if you've looked at what the risks vs. benefits are.

The people in the countries with universal medical coverage tend to be enthusiastic.

I have had this disease a very long time, and all I can say is, I loathe rheumatologists and the whole Medical - Industrial complex in the U.S. Regular doctors, my dentist, my eye doctor, my ob- gyn, all have acknowledged that I certainly have arthritis and its various side effects/symptoms from what they see - it is only the HMO /managed care rheumatologists and the one Neurologist from ****

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I am guessing, Takala, that you might be insured (if that is the right word) by that big engineering company :o I have always chosen any insurance but that one (I know, sometimes you don't have a choice :( ) I live in a universal health insurance country and they cannot afford to provide me with Humira - I have to come back to the US every year and get it under my Medicare :D, and it was only because my rheumatologist here recommended it that my rheumy there prescribed it - he didn't even think there was any relationship between celiac and RA or PsA. :unsure: Now this was just plain ignorance, not denial.

At any rate, if the diet were working for me I would not be taking the Humira. Unfortunately, diet does not have any effect on my symptoms. And to date I have no known side effects from Humira, although I react negatively to most meds. Heck, I can't even take aspirin, ibuprofen, benadryl, codeine, .... and on, and on and on. Maybe that will happen with Humira eventuallly too, at which point I might throw in the towel, but until that day I will keep taking it 'cos it's the only thing I can take. :huh:

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I wonder if this means celiacs shouldn't be taking large amounts of vitamin A in pills? Although if the negative effect only happens with gluten is present, maybe it doesn't hurt anything. It could be a good reason not to take a multi-vitamin when glutened by accident though. OR to avoid foods high in Vitamin A when glutened.

Vitamin A on Wiki

Vitamin A is found naturally in many foods:

* liver (beef, pork, chicken, turkey, fish) (6500 μg 722%), including cod liver oil

* carrot (835 μg 93%)

* broccoli leaf (800 μg 89%)

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Hey GFinDC!- I've always been fascinated that you can't eat Bug's Bunnies Carrots...and wondered how on earth you figured that one out....but maybe it's the Vitamin A? I've always tried to take high Vitamin A without reaching toxic levels thinking it is good for my skin. But if it is inflammatory....oh god...I'm backing off of it just in case. Can't hurt to try...especially regarding the fact that I have unresponsive DH. Very interesting.

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Hi EM4G,

I am wondering about the carrots and Vitamin A myself. I figured it out by doing an elimination diet. Actually I did 3 different elimination diets over the past 3 years. Always found something new that I hadn't figured out before too. I was really surprised when I added carrots to my diet at one point and had a bad GI reaction. I tried them several times later to be sure and it was always bad news. There are a few people on the board that have carrot problems besides me. I don't have an allergy type reaction to them, but other people do.

Anyone Allergic To Carrots?

For people that have allergy (IgE) reactions, there is a cross reaction possible for quite a few foods. I think it makes sense that the same kind of cross reaction is possible in food intolerance type reactions. At least, I haven't seen any rule carved in stone saying it isn't possible. If you search for allergy and cross reaction you can find lots of lists of lists of them.

Current understanding of cross-reactivity of food allergens and pollen.

Abstract

Pollen-allergic patients frequently present allergic symptoms after ingestion of several kinds of plant-derived foods. The majority of these reactions is caused by four distinct cross-reactive structures that are present in birch pollen. Proteins that share common epitopes with Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen, occur in pollens of several tree species: apples, stone fruits, celery, carrot, nuts, and soybeans. Approximately 70% of our patients who are allergic to birch pollen may experience symptoms after consumption of foods from these groups. In contrast, two minor allergenic structures-profilins and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCD)-that sensitize approximately 10-20% of all pollen-allergic patients are also present in grass pollen and weed pollen. Moreover, IgE-binding proteins related to the birch pollen minor allergen Bet v 6 have been found in many vegetable foods such as apple, peach, orange, lychee fruit, strawberry, persimmon, zucchini, and carrot. Frequently, the occurrence of cross-reactive IgE antibodies is not correlated with the development of clinical food allergy. In particular, the clinical relevance of sensitization to CCD is doubtful. Generally, pollen-related allergens tend to be more labile during heating procedures and in the digestive tract compared to allergens from classical allergenic foods such as peanut. However, recent DBPCFC studies have shown that both cooked celery and roasted hazelnuts still pose an allergenic risk for pollen-sensitized subjects. Since pathogenesis-related proteins share several common features with allergens and both the Bet v 1 and the Bet v 6-related food allergens are defense-related proteins, approaches to introduce such proteins as a measure to protect plants against diseases should be performed with caution as they may increase the allergenicity of these crops.

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That is an interesting connection between Vitamin A retinoic acid causing more inflammation when they thought it would be anti-inflammatory. This may speak to why Accutane (retinoic acid derivative of vitamin A) is now being implicated in "causing" intestinal disorders like Chron's, Celiac and IBS.

I just spoke to the lawyer who is among the group processing the huge case up in NJ right now with the actor from " A Few Good Men ". This actor has a diagnosis of celiac and IBD, not crohns or UC. The lawyer was VERY interested in my case and the research out of the University of Chicago, ironically where I did my residency. Go here to see the recent press release from the University of Chicago. http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2011/20110209-celiac-disease.html

His name is Van Robichaux and his website is www.accutanenews.com. He is asking that any one who took accutane or its generics and later developed Celiac disease go to the website and register your case. it's too expensive to try one single case, such as mine, but they are very interested in getting a group if cases together. Not a class action, but 5-10 cases to be tried together. I know I am not unique in my experience. This could get the word out about this horrible connection.

I am in no way affiliated with this law firm. I'm simply a doctor who took accutane during my residency training bc I had severe outbreaks at that time. I now know it was probably wheat related, but I was healthy still until after the accutane. Now I'm unable to do a job that I love and trained for my whole life. I KNOW if it's this easy to induce celiac with accutane in mice that Roche should have known but hid these side effects, causing immense pain and suffering for many of us. I spoke with five other law firms advertising on celiac sites and no one else could even spell celiac. They were only interested in Crohns or UC.

If you have any questions, email me. Tysonholly@hotmail.com. And if you are a moderator, please help me spread the word about registering these cases. There is nothing in it for me except justice and education.

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I wonder if this means celiacs shouldn't be taking large amounts of vitamin A in pills? Although if the negative effect only happens with gluten is present, maybe it doesn't hurt anything. It could be a good reason not to take a multi-vitamin when glutened by accident though. OR to avoid foods high in Vitamin A when glutened.

Vitamin A on Wiki

Vitamin A is found naturally in many foods:

* liver (beef, pork, chicken, turkey, fish) (6500 μg 722%), including cod liver oil

* carrot (835 μg 93%)

* broccoli leaf (800 μg 89%)

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Hi EM4G,

I am wondering about the carrots and Vitamin A myself. I figured it out by doing an elimination diet. Actually I did 3 different elimination diets over the past 3 years. Always found something new that I hadn't figured out before too. I was really surprised when I added carrots to my diet at one point and had a bad GI reaction. I tried them several times later to be sure and it was always bad news. There are a few people on the board that have carrot problems besides me. I don't have an allergy type reaction to them, but other people do.

Anyone Allergic To Carrots?

For people that have allergy (IgE) reactions, there is a cross reaction possible for quite a few foods. I think it makes sense that the same kind of cross reaction is possible in food intolerance type reactions. At least, I haven't seen any rule carved in stone saying it isn't possible. If you search for allergy and cross reaction you can find lots of lists of lists of them.

Current understanding of cross-reactivity of food allergens and pollen.

Abstract

Pollen-allergic patients frequently present allergic symptoms after ingestion of several kinds of plant-derived foods. The majority of these reactions is caused by four distinct cross-reactive structures that are present in birch pollen. Proteins that share common epitopes with Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen, occur in pollens of several tree species: apples, stone fruits, celery, carrot, nuts, and soybeans. Approximately 70% of our patients who are allergic to birch pollen may experience symptoms after consumption of foods from these groups. In contrast, two minor allergenic structures-profilins and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCD)-that sensitize approximately 10-20% of all pollen-allergic patients are also present in grass pollen and weed pollen. Moreover, IgE-binding proteins related to the birch pollen minor allergen Bet v 6 have been found in many vegetable foods such as apple, peach, orange, lychee fruit, strawberry, persimmon, zucchini, and carrot. Frequently, the occurrence of cross-reactive IgE antibodies is not correlated with the development of clinical food allergy. In particular, the clinical relevance of sensitization to CCD is doubtful. Generally, pollen-related allergens tend to be more labile during heating procedures and in the digestive tract compared to allergens from classical allergenic foods such as peanut. However, recent DBPCFC studies have shown that both cooked celery and roasted hazelnuts still pose an allergenic risk for pollen-sensitized subjects. Since pathogenesis-related proteins share several common features with allergens and both the Bet v 1 and the Bet v 6-related food allergens are defense-related proteins, approaches to introduce such proteins as a measure to protect plants against diseases should be performed with caution as they may increase the allergenicity of these crops.

Very interesting and makes a ton of sense!

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Thanks Holly,

I think you are right, it is better to get the vitamins from food than pills. When I did my elimination diets, one of the first things I always eliminated was vitamin pills. Especially multi-vitamin pills. It is hard to even find any that don't have soy or gluten or casein. Plus they are always suspect to me when they have so many ingredients.

Some of us have damage to our intestines at first and don't absorb pills/nutrients right. So people get the sub-lingual B-12 or sometimes liquid vitamins to take. But it seems like after a while with some healing the plain food option would be ok. I know I limit my vitamin pills a lot more now and usually don't take them every day, sometimes a couple times a week is all I do. Except for B-12, I try to take that daily.

It seems kind of funny that such a basic thing like food would be something we are just starting to begin to understand at this point. Maybe we aren't all that smart at all. Oh well! :)

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It's hard to overdose on vitamins from natural sources because food sources rarely contain high enough concentrations of the vitamin. Though, a famous example is polar bear liver. It is unsafe to eat because it contains incredibly high levels of vitamin A.

About Accutane: I was on Accutane several years back. I was 13, covered in cysts, and very depressed. The thing is, I knew that 1. I was depressed because I was covered in painful, oozing cysts, and I was a pariah at school, and 2. that there was something very wrong with my body for my skin to get that bad in the first place. I don't think Accutane did anything to warrant the attention it has gotten, and I'm glad that I took it. I'm more inclined to think that people taking Accutane already have or are predisposed to these problems.

Another thing: the side-effects of Accutane always looked suspiciously similar to vitamin A poisoning. Just saying.

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