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Meat Glue Secret - Why Celiacs Need to Beware of this Possibly Non-Gluten-free ... - Celiac.com (blog)

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Celiac.com (blog)

Meat Glue Secret - Why Celiacs Need to Beware of this Possibly Non-Gluten-free ...

Celiac.com (blog)

I recently saw a post on Face[taKuQpbYrmealfBBvhXHG] in the Celiac Global Guide group about "meat glue." It told celiacs to beware if you are eating meat because you are most likely, directly digesting transglutaminase (meat glue. ...

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stay organic

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<table border="0" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="7" style="vertical-align:top;"><tr><td width="80" align="center" valign="top"><font style="font-size:85%;font-family:arial, sans-serif;"><a rel="nofollow" target="external nofollow" href="http://news.google.com/news/url?sa=t&fd=R&usg=AFQjCNFLauq5rfhwUEUPivZpydkB-qUdqw&url=http://www.celiac.com/blogs/278/Meat-Glue-Secret----Why-Celiacs-Need-to-Beware-of-this-Possibly-Non-Gluten-free-Ingredient.html"><img src="http://nt1.ggpht.com/news/tbn/xTinTrzYvzhhFM/6.jpg" alt="" border="1" width="80" height="80"/>

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<font size="-1"><b><font color="#6f6f6f">Celiac.com (blog)</font></b></font>

<font size="-1">I recently saw a post on Face[taKuQpbYrmealfBBvhXHG] in the <b>Celiac</b> Global Guide group about "meat glue." It told celiacs to beware if you are eating meat because you are most likely, directly digesting transglutaminase (meat glue. <b>...</b></font>

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Ok, so I agree that meat glue sounds gross, but can someone tell me the actual danger specifically to Celiacs? This is an enzyme that is related to what we have... in that we produce antibodies to . From wikipedia, "Antibodies to tissue transglutaminase are found in celiac disease and may play a role in the small bowel damage in response to dietary gliadin that characterises this condition"

Biologists? Anyone? Will we produce antibodies if we ingest cow/pig transglutaminase? The video says this enzyme is the coagulant, which makes me wonder if it's even related. Isn't it "just" made from animal blood plasma? (Maybe factor XIII?) If so, the title of this is very misleading. I'd like to see some science behind the connection before I freak out. (Other than the obvious OMG they're putting stuff in my meat that isn't meat!!)

This seems to indicate there may be maltodextrin (corn) and casein in it: http://www.prisonplanet.com/meat-glue-the-meat-industry

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Anybody who says "I saw it on Facebook" then tells me to watch a video to see what they saw, I don't bother unless they provide a full transcript and an explanation. Scare tactics which result in my supposed to be going "vegan" for my gluten free status health, I just laugh at. I'm more likely to run into gluten in processed "organic," or vegan items, since most vegans DO eat a lot of wheat.

My spouse has done this recently with several grocery items, made the mistake of picking up "organic" generic tomato stock items, assuming they would be gluten free. They have unspecified "natural flavorings," which can be anything. And just why do tomatoes need "natural flavoring" anyway ? Another is a ketchup which changed its formula, and got me with a mild reaction. I didn't know which ingredient until the next day when I studied the labels, & saw a new bottle in the refrigerator, he just selected it based on the stupid "organic" label and they had the nerve to claim its gluten free on the label, and it's certainly not now. Now they're going into the food donation bag, except for the one we unfortunately opened and he's stuck either eating himself or throwing it out.

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Gross. Of course this isn't even a risk of being a problem if you raise your own meat, go hunting, or buy from a local farmer you can visit.

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Ok, so I agree that meat glue sounds gross, but can someone tell me the actual danger specifically to Celiacs? This is an enzyme that is related to what we have... in that we produce antibodies to . From wikipedia, "Antibodies to tissue transglutaminase are found in celiac disease and may play a role in the small bowel damage in response to dietary gliadin that characterises this condition"

I agree. I can't imagine how this would have any affect on a person.

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I agree. I can't imagine how this would have any affect on a person.

I wonder about that too. But since they don't have to declare it on ingredients (per the article) then there is no one to check with on possible gluten cc at the manufacturing plant. So, who's to say really? Probably not a problem, but hard to verify too.

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Ok, so I agree that meat glue sounds gross, but can someone tell me the actual danger specifically to Celiacs? This is an enzyme that is related to what we have... in that we produce antibodies to . From wikipedia, "Antibodies to tissue transglutaminase are found in celiac disease and may play a role in the small bowel damage in response to dietary gliadin that characterises this condition"

I did some reading.."Transglutaminase is a crosslinking enzyme that is being used more extensively in foods and has been widely accepted as a processing aid. We, and others, have reported the use of transglutaminase in the baking industry to improve the functional properties of bread, pastry and croissant dough. Early work suggested that transglutaminase may reduce the allergenicity of wheat flour. However, recent research into the molecular mechanism of coeliac disease suggests the disturbing possibility that transglutaminase in baked products may act upon gliadin proteins in dough to generate the epitope associated with the coeliac response. Further work is urgently required to assess this possibility. In the meantime, we do not recommend the use of transglutaminase in baked products."

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VHY-4GWBDVC-3&_user=10&_coverDate=11%2F30%2F2005&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=gateway&_origin=gateway&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1718772227&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=06255eb39e01efc07c3133127a3a630a&searchtype=a

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Alright! Enough!

If we don't grow it or kill it ourselves, we can't eat it! I will surely lose some weight with this new eating plan! ;)

Backyard bunnies, beware!

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I'm so with you there... chickens and sheep in the backyard. Lots of garden space... :)

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Time to get out the old fishin' rod and some nightcrawlers Karen! :)

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Time to get out the old fishin' rod and some nightcrawlers Karen! :)

My hub loves to fish!

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I did some reading.."Transglutaminase is a crosslinking enzyme that is being used more extensively in foods and has been widely accepted as a processing aid. We, and others, have reported the use of transglutaminase in the baking industry to improve the functional properties of bread, pastry and croissant dough. Early work suggested that transglutaminase may reduce the allergenicity of wheat flour. However, recent research into the molecular mechanism of coeliac disease suggests the disturbing possibility that transglutaminase in baked products may act upon gliadin proteins in dough to generate the epitope associated with the coeliac response. Further work is urgently required to assess this possibility. In the meantime, we do not recommend the use of transglutaminase in baked products."

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VHY-4GWBDVC-3&_user=10&_coverDate=11%2F30%2F2005&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=gateway&_origin=gateway&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1718772227&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=06255eb39e01efc07c3133127a3a630a&searchtype=a

Thanks for finding that. This seems to indicate that transglutaminase needs gliadin to elicit a response.

I hope the moderators/board editors think about pulling the article from the site or at least put up a new headline/disclaimer. Seems irresponsible to yell fire in a crowded theatre.

I still think meat glue is gross, though. =)

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Thanks for finding that. This seems to indicate that transglutaminase needs gliadin to elicit a response.

I hope the moderators/board editors think about pulling the article from the site or at least put up a new headline/disclaimer. Seems irresponsible to yell fire in a crowded theatre.

I still think meat glue is gross, though. =)

Thank you for explaining.. even though I posted it...I couldn't interpret it properly. See that's why this article is good.. I lerned something.. ;)

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I hope the moderators/board editors think about pulling the article from the site or at least put up a new headline/disclaimer. Seems irresponsible to yell fire in a crowded theatre.

I have added to the title to indicate that the topic is controversial. While I understand your perspective, even bad publicity based on misinformation is worthy of discussion. :angry:

Better that we see it and rebut it than try to ignore it. My thought, anyway. :(

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Meh, from the article it looks like meat glue is used to make those processed meat products like sausages, meat loaf etc. Wouldn't touch those anyway, with the risk of gluten being used for binding too high. I'm fairly sure plain steaks/chops/chicken doesn't use meat glue. No need to go hunting for your own, just go to a decent butchery!

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LOL !! Not much wildlife here in the "big" city. Guess i join you on that weight loss program.

Alright! Enough!

If we don't grow it or kill it ourselves, we can't eat it! I will surely lose some weight with this new eating plan! ;)

Backyard bunnies, beware!

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I have added to the title to indicate that the topic is controversial. While I understand your perspective, even bad publicity based on misinformation is worthy of discussion. :angry:

Better that we see it and rebut it than try to ignore it. My thought, anyway. :(

Thanks =) It is appreciated. And, of course "bad publicity based on misinformation is worthy of discussion". That made me chuckle, though I agree (thus my active discussion on it)

The article came up on my google news alerts and I see a lot of people blindly tweeting it/etc, so that is my concern. As you know, many people read something like that on the internet, don't research it, take it out of context, and next thing you know I'm ordering gluten-free meal at a restaurant and they give me a vegetarian meal. ;)

Marz - To the "only in processed meat/sausages" comment... not so! Watch the video/etc and see the glue in action.

What worries me is the maltodextrin and casein... I'm trying SO hard to keep corn out of my diet. Much harder to avoid than gluten! ...and the whole idea of unlisted ingredients. Ugh.

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What worries me is the maltodextrin and casein... I'm trying SO hard to keep corn out of my diet. Much harder to avoid than gluten! ...and the whole idea of unlisted ingredients. Ugh.

Corn is a real challenge. Casein is milk protein, and as such is an allergen that must be disclosed on the label in both Canada and the USA.

"Unlisted ingredients" is a myth, although one with some basis. Everything contained in a food product in the USA and in Canada must be accounted for in the ingredient list. That is the law. There are some terms which are legally permitted that are ambiguous. As an example, malted barley (gluten) can be hidden in "natural flavor" although it almost never is.

In the US and in Canada, wheat is an allergen that must be explicitly labeled. Oats and rye don't hide. The concern is the possibility that flavor or seasoning might contain hidden barley.

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Corn is a real challenge. Casein is milk protein, and as such is an allergen that must be disclosed on the label in both Canada and the USA.

"Unlisted ingredients" is a myth, although one with some basis. Everything contained in a food product in the USA and in Canada must be accounted for in the ingredient list. That is the law. There are some terms which are legally permitted that are ambiguous. As an example, malted barley (gluten) can be hidden in "natural flavor" although it almost never is.

In the US and in Canada, wheat is an allergen that must be explicitly labeled. Oats and rye don't hide. The concern is the possibility that flavor or seasoning might contain hidden barley.

I am quite familiar with the US labeling laws and the difference between most of the grocery store vs. meat (and who is responsible for the labeling: following the statutes of FMIA, PPIA, EPIA, etc). I've spent lots of time reading about them all...

But, you're saying that if they use this meat glue, they'll list it? I think the whole idea behind this was that they can use it and not tell us.

Meat products sold here (California) do not always list ingredients on the package - right or wrong, it's the case. At our local Henry's they have a rack full of meat (not in the butcher shop, but wrapped up) that is packaged that just says something like "fajita meat" or "parsley chicken" and when you look at it it is meat and veggies, seasonings, maybe breadcrumbs or in a marinade - and the ingredients aren't listed, nor are they obvious. I asked the employee about it and he offered to go get the ingredient card from the back. Nowhere on the package does it say what's in it. Same experience at bigger grocery stores. I assume a point of purchase loophole...but it's a very large loophole. (Off topic, but I started really noticing it when I found an unintended piece of parsley in a package of chicken!)

I'm not sure if "meat glue" is applied at point-of-purchase, or how that works.

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Not disagreeing with Poeter at all here. But I seem to remember reading about wine in the US labeling, that it was ok to not list ingredients that were derived from the original source of the product (grapes). In other words, wine can have additional flavorings/supplements added as long as they are derived somehow from grapes in the US of A without it being listed. So I wonder if this is the same thing for meats in the US of A? From the video it sounds like it is. Real life could differ of course...

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AH HA! Found a statement with some substance for us (um...sorta)! Check it out:

"The main hazard of creating novel proteins is their effect as a potential allergen. While TG itself is non-allergenic, there are studies that show that gluten can be made more allergenic if treated with TG. Gluten-free cereal products can contain a small amount of gluten. That small amount is below the threshold of activity for Celiac patients. If that small amount of gluten is made more allergenic by TG, there is the possibility that a “Gluten Free” product could suddenly pose a hazard*. Interestingly, there are other studies that claim that if gluten is reacted with mTG under the right circumstances, it can be rendered safe for consumption by Celiac sufferers**.

*(Microbial Transglutaminases Generate T Cell Stimulatory Epitopes Involved in Celiac Disease, E.H.A. Dekking, et al, Journal of Cereal Science 47 (2008), 339-346.

**Transamidation of Wheat Flour Inhibits the Response to Gliadin of Intestinal T Cells in Celiac Disease, Carmen Gianfrani, et al. Gastroenterology 133 (2007), 780-789."

...so, inconclusive, but at least someone at some point in time has considered it. :D

That's from http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/transglutaminase-aka-meat-glue/

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After I read this article I did some internet surfing and found that transglutaminase is used in far more applications than just "meat glue". Its used in dairy products, pasta products, dough enhancers, and many more. So my questions is there are so many celiacs that have other food intoloerances & issues, maybe they are reacting to the transglutaminase in the products instead???

I know that I have had reactions to food when no gluten has been consumed! I don't eat out ever & my whole family (husband, 2 kids)are gluten free. We only eat items we prepare in our home, but we eat pastas & other items labeled gluten free made on equipment dedicated to gluten free. The reactions are inconsistent as it seems the reactions happen once to an item & then not again when it consumed, but the only connection to all the reactions would be they contain transglutamine.

It is my understanding from the reading I have done that it is not required to be listed on packaging since it isn't an "ingredient" but rather a "natural" enzyme???

I for one am of the mind set that the FDA doesn't protect the consumer as much as they do the big business so it wouldn't be a shock if it doesn't have to be listed.

Celiacs is an endless journey!

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I for one am of the mind set that the FDA doesn't protect the consumer as much as they do the big business so it wouldn't be a shock if it doesn't have to be listed.

Agreed. I feel that way about a lot of organizations! =)

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