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    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

Haylsinator

Ok, Not To Be A Total Skeptic...

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I keep seeing things about CC with pots, pans, collanders, wooden spoons, etc. I don't know why but I have so much trouble accepting that I could actually experince symptoms from this. I understand that any small amount can be doing damage to the intestine but could my symptoms, that I can't see to get full relief from, really be because I used a washed pot that once held wheat pasta? I know I should be more considerate of my body and attempt to prevent any damage that may be causedl; I'm trying but I think I'm in a minor state of rebellion. I eat gluten-free but I do use a shared kitchen, pots, etc (all cleaned).

What I'd really love to hear is anyone's personal experience where they know that they were glutened from this kind of CC and it couldn't have been anything else.

These variations in how long before sypmtoms arise, how symptoms are different for everyone, etc has me completely uncertain on how to know if I've been glutened or have other issues.

Thank you for reading and putting up with my grumpiness :)

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I wonder about that too. I did replace my wooden spoons because they are cheap but I'm sure someone in the house will use them for gluten foods eventually. I simply cannot afford to replace my pots, not going to happen.

I also wonder if all non-stick pots are equally bad. Ours are non-stick but not Teflon and I keep reading how Teflon is bad.

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I keep seeing things about CC with pots, pans, collanders, wooden spoons, etc. I don't know why but I have so much trouble accepting that I could actually experince symptoms from this. I understand that any small amount can be doing damage to the intestine but could my symptoms, that I can't see to get full relief from, really be because I used a washed pot that once held wheat pasta? I know I should be more considerate of my body and attempt to prevent any damage that may be causedl; I'm trying but I think I'm in a minor state of rebellion. I eat gluten-free but I do use a shared kitchen, pots, etc (all cleaned).

Well, the thing to remember here is that it is your immune system hunting down the gluten. Your immune system's job is to be able to find single bacteria or single viruses and be able to respond and take them out. I can't even convey how small and insignificant viruses are, and how few it takes to successfully infect a person with an illness. Your body is trained to be very good at what it does--it just sadly backfires in a person with Celiac disease. It uses it's skills to find single particles of gluten with a high level of accuracy.

I use silicone utensils, and unscratched non-stick cookware that has been used for gluten-y things in the past, but this is out of monetary necessity. I simply refuse to use wooden utensils or scratched cookware, because it's not hard to imagine flour trapped in the pores or in-between the layer of Teflon and metal.

The most convincing thing you can do is have a chat with a graduate-level cell biology student or an organic/bio-chemistry student. If your local University has a parasitology or bacteriology professor, then you've won the lottery. Go have a chat...they are fantastically friendly when you ask questions like this. :)

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I don't know if I have actually been glutened from anything in this way to be honest. Some things I just replaced to avoid any potential problem. Things I got rid or/replaced included: wooden cutting boards that I had bread/gluten on, wooden spoons, baking stone, bake ware (they had cooked on "stuff"), toaster, plastic colonder, my old plastic utensils (wanted new ones anyway), waffle iron and any scratched teflon pans. Things I didn't replace: most of my cookware which is caflon (no teflon coating) (I did replace the griddle and pasta pot both were scratched), glass baking pans, and my jelly roll/cookie pans (I was able to sucessfully clean these and get off all baked on residue). I was bad about using the same measuring spoons/cups for flour and sugar and spices/herbs and would double dip so I needed to replace my baking soda, baking powder, spices and some herbs, granulated sugar, and powdered/brown sugar due to cross contamination. Since I did theses steps from the beginning, I don't think I have had any issue from this. When I go to others houses and need to use any pans I either line with foil or take my own pot. When I go to my inlaws or parents I always take my electric skillet! It's been a godsend. My mom has some stainless steel cookware for me to use when I am there also.

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could my symptoms, that I can't see to get full relief from, really be because I used a washed pot that once held wheat pasta? I know I should be more considerate of my body and attempt to prevent any damage that may be causedl; I'm trying but I think I'm in a minor state of rebellion. I eat gluten-free but I do use a shared kitchen, pots, etc (all cleaned).

It is hard to believe that such a tiny amount of gluten can still cause problems. When I was first diagnosed I ignored stuff like gluten ingredients in toiletries and although I did get a new toaster and replaced scratched pans and my strainer I still would have issues. At first I just couldn't believe that the small amount of gluten reside in lotions and wheat based ingredients in shampoos and such would keep me sick. It wasn't until I replaced those toiletries with non gluten ones that I finally really healed.

Celiac is autoimmune. It isn't the gluten that damages us it is the antibody reaction that does. It takes very little gluten to call the antibodies into action and create symptoms. Those antibodies don't just attack the gut they attack the entire body.

Since you are still having issues you, IMHO, should at least get your own wooden utensils, strainer and a non-stick skillet for just your gluten free use and see if your issues resolve. I didn't replace stuff like my stainless pots and pans or dishes as those can be throughly washed. You wouldn't eat a salad that had croutons on it that someone just removed and handed back to you even if you couldn't see any crumbs. Strainers and wooden utensils can have reside that is virtually impossible to remove just like the crumbs from those croutons.

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I kept thinking the same thing until I realized one day that my skillet had scratches in them. You can't cook the gluten out of the scratches. Once I chucked my skillet and got a cheap skillet from the dollar store and a new spatula I finally started feeling a lot better.

Let's hope you don't get as sensitive as I am and react to a contaminated refrigerator door or your doornobs, but what really surprised me was when I reacted to a contaminated steering wheel.

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I am not celiac, so I thought (after months of being gluten free) that it would be ok to have a piece of gluten free banana bread at a friend's house who I know used an old pan and would have cc in her kitchen (didn't let the kids have any). I definitely experienced symptoms from it.

I also know that until we did the deep clean and declutter on our own kitchen our son was still being glutened regularly and had lingering symptoms and I hadn't gotten better (actually felt worse). After we cleared everything out we stopped getting mystery glutenings.

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I resisted throwing away my wooden spoons because I also didn't really think they could be a problem after many thorough washings. Then I got glutened making pasta and stirring with one of those spoons. It took about 3 months after being gluten free to clear my system enough and become sensitive enough until I felt the glutening from the spoon. So I finally tossed them and haven't had issues making pasta since.

I also felt that since I tested negative for celiac I had more leeway. If I had tested positive I would have thrown them away immediately. A negative test doesn't necessarily mean you're less sensitive, though, as I am finding.

I spaced out the other day and licked the tip of an envelope shut. I felt severe stomach pains several hours later and brain fog following. Luckily I was on my way to a "Big Lebowski" dudefest, so I was a cheap date. :)

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Envelopes have pretty much been debunked as sources of gluten. The glue they use does NOT have gluten.

richard

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Stainless steel pans that have been scrubbed clean are fine. It's the things that have scratches, or are pourous (like wood) that are the concern. If you are skeptical you could try to cook without these things for a couple weeks to see if your lingering symptoms disappear. You can easily use foil on baking sheets, put parchement over old cutting boards, use metal spoons for stirring and cook mainly in the microwave instead of on non-stick pans for a few weeks to test this out. I had one non-stick pan that I did not replace and that was only because it was new at the time I started gltuen free--it had no scratches and had only been used for gltuen pancakes twice. For everything else I did the above suggestions (using foil, cutting on a plate instead of a cutting board, not using the old wooden spoons and not using my old toaster) until I could afford to replace everything. I slipped up and used an old wooden spoon once for making gluten free bread and I payed for it. My wooden spoons went in the trsh the next day.

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I got glutened by a scratched non stick pan.

All gluten-free ingredients....fresh veggies in a gluten-free kitchen. Only thing was the pan (for sure)

It wasn't the worst reaction but DEFINITELY a reaction.

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I've gotten sick at my mother's house eating verified gluten free foods so I feel it had to be the cookware. She's got a lot of older/scratched items. Since I've told her to only use non-scratched cookware, metal utinsels, and/or disposable pans I've not had any trouble.

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Envelopes have pretty much been debunked as sources of gluten. The glue they use does NOT have gluten.

richard

Hmm - the only other questionable item was a tempeh reuben I made for lunch. I've suspected it before, but I can't figure out what's in it that would make me react.

I make it with Udi's bread, sauerkraut, Lightlife tempeh (flax), and Annie's Thousand Island dressing.

I've been fine every time I've had it except the last two times. Could the dressing be an issue? I'm fine with udi's (have it all the time, and soy is fine too).

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I know what you mean because that was my initial reaction. Luckily all of my pans are not of the nonstick variety. The only thing I have done so far is not use any wooden utensils for my non gluten foods and I bought another strainer for my gluten free pasta. Also, I have segregated the butter. Since I am too cheap to buy gluten free bread (not only cheap, but they feel hard as a brick) I haven't bought a new toaster. It is better safe than sorry, is what I keep telling myself.

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Hmm - the only other questionable item was a tempeh reuben I made for lunch. I've suspected it before, but I can't figure out what's in it that would make me react.

I make it with Udi's bread, sauerkraut, Lightlife tempeh (flax), and Annie's Thousand Island dressing.

I've been fine every time I've had it except the last two times. Could the dressing be an issue? I'm fine with udi's (have it all the time, and soy is fine too).

Is the Annie's safe? I remember the Dr. telling me to buy that brand of dressing when daughter was first diagnosed. And granted this was almost 6 years ago but I seem to remember something on the label about shared lines or may contain.

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I too was a non-believer ! I live in a household of 5 and I didn't believe pots & pans that were cleaned were gonna get me. It didn't take long to change my mind (a few years ago).

Further proof is that when I visit relatives for a week or whatever, no matter how careful I am, after a few days I am sick - cutting boards, pans, whatever. Ok, yeah, it has been spices too but I get got !

Small doses add up - and affect you like you had a big dose. :( There seems to be a cummulative effect.

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Thank you all so much for your replies, input, andfor sharing your personal experiences with me. I'll try harder to avoid scratched pans and will probably invest in my own cutting board (yes, I've been using a shared wooden cutting board, only wiped down with a shared sponge!). I feel very negligent now and wish I could apologize to my body lol

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Glutened by a steering wheel? Did you lick it? I don't mean to be a smart a**, but doesn't the gluten have to enter your digestive system? I don't think you get glutened by surface contact. Maybe I'm wrong. I do touch my husband's regular bread and carefully wash my hands. I've had no problem from that.

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Glutened by a steering wheel? Did you lick it? I don't mean to be a smart a**, but doesn't the gluten have to enter your digestive system? I don't think you get glutened by surface contact. Maybe I'm wrong. I do touch my husband's regular bread and carefully wash my hands. I've had no problem from that.

Don't you ever eat in the car?

I can see my husband eating a burger while driving and then me sitting in the same seat the next day driving and eating a bag of rice chips. For a very sensitive individual this is totally plausible. I'm not quite that sensitive but not far off.

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Glutened by a steering wheel? Did you lick it? I don't mean to be a smart a**, but doesn't the gluten have to enter your digestive system? I don't think you get glutened by surface contact. Maybe I'm wrong. I do touch my husband's regular bread and carefully wash my hands. I've had no problem from that.

Actually for the antibodies to be activated the gluten only needs to contact a mucous membrane. If you made your husbands sandwich and then ate a gluten free one or rubbed your nose or eyes you would activate the antibodies. Making that sandwich is also surface contact, which you are avoiding problems with by washing your hands to prevent CC.

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This conversation has convinced me to toss my wooden spoons and strainer...I didn't even think of that! ugh $$$$

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Actually, I don't eat in my car... or text or use a cell. I only drive. Distracted driving is as dangerous as drunk driving.

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This conversation has convinced me to toss my wooden spoons and strainer...I didn't even think of that! ugh $$$$

Me too!

You know, I read and read and read... cc, cc, cc,.. and think...yes, but I haven't had problems. But then... I have been feeling like crap too and thinking that I don't know why. DUH!!! :blink: Time to throw some stuff out. ;)

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Anything's possible, I think. I brought almost all my own food to my sister's house for Christmas and only used one of her microwave containers, the micro, a plate, some of her squeeze gluten-free mustard, some gluten-free ham she made plain just for me (although bro-in-law did carve it with one of their knives--but in an aluminum pan, not the cutting board) and a fork....came home glutened anyway. They were all eating pasta, bread, pies.... :blink:

hmm... I did kiss them all goodbye.... :unsure:

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Actually, I don't eat in my car... or text or use a cell. I only drive. Distracted driving is as dangerous as drunk driving.

My non-gluten-free husband will go through the drive-thru someplace and then pull into a parking spot to eat in the car. Then he drives home. I do believe the steering wheel has gotten me before when I drove after he had been driving my car. All it takes is for me to rub my eye or somethign and the gluten residue enters via a mucous membrane. Now I make him wipe down the steering wheel and the shifter after he drives my car (which is not very often anyway so it's not that big of a deal to do).

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    TDZ, I am so sorry to hear about what your husband is going through. I have also experienced unusual chills more or less at the same time as DH outbreaks.  Not severe chills with the violent shivering, as one can get from a repeat bout of malaria, but just not being able to get warm, even when the house is at its same normal temperature --- sometimes I would check the thermostat, almost certain that the heat had failed for some reason, then walking around the house with an extra sweater, or
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