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ErinP

Do You Aim For Gluten Free Or Completely Grain Free?

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Just curious how others are managing this.

I realize gluten free is the rule of the thumb.

But, the more I research, both prior to diagnosis and after, the more I think gluten-free isn't good enough. Personally, I aim for completely grain free. I have corn periodically and that's about it.

Grains are calorically dense and nutrient poor, not to mention the fact that they are more likely to be digestive irritants, even in people without gluten intolerances.

I tend to think gluten free baked goods, cereals, etc. should be rare treats, rather than standard fare.

Am I the only one?

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I agree with limitting the gluten-free baked goods and cereals, but I still like my rice.

I grew up in the midwest and was a "cornasoir", loved it. And I loved hispanic foods. About one year after going gluten-free, I developed an intolerance to corn, so corn is out for me.

Rice hasn't bothered my digestive system so far. I'm iffy on gluten-free oats, but I don't like oatmeal, I was just trying to make a good fruit cobbler, but never found a gluten-free recipe that I thought was really good.

I'll never stick any form of Quinoa in my mouth again.

Everybody's autoimmune system responds differently, though. It's wierd.

For now, I'm doing gluten-free, soy, dairy and corn free, so that limits virtually all processed foods except a few canned meats, canned or frozen veggies, peanut butter and coffee. It makes grocery shopping fairly quick, but I make a separate stop at a produce market. (Prices and quality are so much better there.)

One thing that helped was to check out Indian Cookbooks from the library. Many recipes are gluten-free and very tasty. And I've never seen soy in an Indian recipe. (Noted your thyroid problem in your tag.)

Good luck to you, hope this helps. :)

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domestic, other than the particular care for gluten, GAPS looks almost identical to a Paleo diet. Which is what I follow.

I've actually been low-carb for the better part of two years and wouldn't have even known about the whole celiac thing except for being hospitalized this spring for four days.

The doc was positive it was Crohn's. Until he looked at my colonoscopy and decided no, it's probably celiac... When I told him I'd had a two week binge on sugar and flour (things I haven't indulged in at all for months!) he said yep. We can do more testing, but it would probably be easier just to go gluten-free and call it good. ;)

When I got out of the hospital, to treat my supposed-Crohn's, I made a minor shift from my low-carb diet to a hybrid version of the Specific Carb diet and a Paleo diet. Basically just knocked out peanut butter and most dairy.

I know what you mean about corn, marilyn. I live on the line between Kansas and Nebraska. We grow a bit of corn in our part of the world. lol On the other hand, I married a working cowboy, so what we REALLY have to have in our house is beef.

Lots of beef. :D

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I aim to be grain free, but a couple of times while out to eat I've eaten a small amount of rice. I felt a little "jointy" (my word for sore joints) the next day. I'd like to keep rice as an option for when we're traveling, but I don't eat it at home. Going grain free was the final hurdle in my diet (and nuts too I am discovering). My joint pain and fatigue sort of cleared after I lost the grains. However I am not trying to be specifically low carb since I'm 43 and still pretty underweight. So I eat a lot of fruit smoothies and white potatoes, and also sweet potatoes. There is diabetes in my family so I'm still watching for that.

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Yes, GAPS is very close to both Paleo and SCD. The main difference is that GAPS takes a phased introductory approach and focuses on regular consumption of bone broth and home-fermented foods. The full GAPS program also includes detoxification and some supplementation. One of these days I'm going to make a proper post with the nuances pulled out.

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I have no problem eating grains. Rice and corn are both regular parts of my diet, as is buckwheat and to a lesser extent, quinoa and wild rice. I do eat less than I did pre-diagnosis, but I also eat more potatoes and sweet potatoes. Probably more like 1 cup grain (or 3 tortillas, or 2 muffins) per day instead of 3.

Oats (gluten-free), well, I keep trying them and deciding that was a bad idea.

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I generally feel better if I include some complex carbohydrates in my diet. To keep things varied I do include non-gluten grains. Otherwise I'd eat an awful lot of potatoes.

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I eat all non-gluten grains minus oats. So far I don't notice any reactions other than oats. The certified gluten-free oats just do not agree with me at all.

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I have turned to a combination of SCD and paleo and am grain free. With the state of GMO corn I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. Grain free has allowed me to be very high functioning physically when four years ago I could barely move due to the severity of my accompanying rheumatoid arthritis. I tried rice but found difficulty with blood sugar regulation. Relatively low carb seems to help as well. Lots of good fats which really seem to taste good now. Years ago I wouldn't have eaten things that I now do.

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I eat lots of grain. Quinoa and rice in particular are consumed very regularly in our house.

If you are grain free and looking for baked good Elena's Pantry appears to be grain free. She uses mostly almond flour and some coconut flour in her recipes but I don't recall seeing grains at all ... or dairy or soy come to think of it.

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Almost totally grain free here as well.

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since eggs are out and most fruit, i have not much choice but to eat some grain for breakfast. i really like my quinoa and buckwheat (alternating between them) with vegetalbes. occationally millet and amaranth. glutenfree oats and rice does not seem do agree with me too much. iffy on the potatoes as well (white and sweet). corn is ok.

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idk... I practically live on rice. I have rice every day pretty much, in some form or another, usually stir-fried with meat and egg or smth. Other times I'll have rice bread or chex.

I try to avoid corn for the most part but I don't avoid it like I do gluten or soy. I don't do much with other grains tho. I did buy some cream of buckwheat but I haven't tried it yet.

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For most people when starting to deal with their gluten intolerance or celiac disease aiming to go entirely grain free is the best route. Until you can develop a strategy and a routine I think it is the best decision. There are several 'safe' grains out there but when starting its wise to remove all grains from your diet.

Any thoughts?

Thanks for the topic.

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Overwhelming response, isn't it? The truth is, everybody cares. And here's something I searched and posted for you... Buckwheat is a pseudocereal that is eaten like a grain, though botanically it is neither a cereal nor a grass. Rather, it is a seed from the herb family Fagopyrum. Buckwheat is not related to wheat, and contains no gluten, so it can be safely eaten by those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance."

Hope I get to use the term "pseudocereal" in a conversation soon. How about "Are those really gluten-free Rice Checks or is that psuedoceral?" (AKA "Did you make buckwheat?) If I have to do the cooking, things could get fun. "We're having strawberry pseudocereal today!"

By the way,buckwheat cooks faster in the morning if you soak it overnight. It's yummy with any fruit.

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Buckwheat is delicious and we really liked the pie crusts we made with it and the pancakes, too. HOWEVER - it "glutened" us horribly. I don't know if it was cross-contaminated or was just causing us problems all on its own, but it's definitely on my list of things to watch out for.

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