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Soggy Pizza Crust

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I have a great pizza crust I really like using a gluten-free flour blend however I can't get the bottom of the crust to get crispy. I've tried pre-baking, on aluminum foil, directly on rack, on parchment paper and I still can't get it to crisp up. If anyone has any suggestions please let me know.

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I have a great pizza crust I really like using a gluten-free flour blend however I can't get the bottom of the crust to get crispy. I've tried pre-baking, on aluminum foil, directly on rack, on parchment paper and I still can't get it to crisp up. If anyone has any suggestions please let me know.

Can you please post the recipe and temperature? Did you try parbaking the crust, flipping it over and baking further? Did you use cornmeal on the bottom?

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I did not try flipping, although especially on the parchment this would be very easy to do, I'll try that next time. I did not use cornmeal as the dough is so very sticky that it would not be a benefit--the taste is wonderful though. I have extra left over from last night so I'm going to try reheating on the grill tonight.

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Just seconding the flipping! Pre bake more than you think you should then flip and top. Also, I got a pizza pan with ridges that is supposed to allow the hot air to get under the crust & dry it out.

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I made that pizza once from the King Arthur website and it stuck to the pan badly in spite of olive oil oozing out the sides. I've since bought their flour to try it again as I mixed up my own the first time.

Just yesterday I got a pizza pan with holes in it from Amazon (Fox Run Pizza Crisper). I lined it with foil (oiled) and after prebaking, I ditched the foil and slid the pizza onto the pan and then topped it before giving it a final baking. The crust wasn't as brown underneath as I would have liked but it was definitely crisper and it was baked through (no raw or doughy areas). I think I should definitely flip it after it's prebaked, which I'll try next time. I'm tempted to "butter" the crust underneath as we know how nicely butter browns things. :P

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Get a pizza stone! Our ovens at home don't go to 600 degrees like the pizza ovens in restaurants do, but a pizza stone will help tremendously. Here is a link that explains how they work: http://www.recipepizza.com/pizza_stone.htm

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Get a pizza stone! Our ovens at home don't go to 600 degrees like the pizza ovens in restaurants do, but a pizza stone will help tremendously. Here is a link that explains how they work: http://www.recipepiz...pizza_stone.htm

I've thought about it but that's about it. My daughter has one very contaminated with gluten and I know my son-in-law used to make a killer pizza. I suggested she run it through her oven's self-cleaning cycle (she also has celiac). So yes, I know how it works.

ETA: For last few pizzas I've made, I've sautéed the veggies first...what a difference that makes.

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http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2010/06/01/what-do-readers-say-about-our-gluten-free-pizza-crust-%E2%80%9Camazing%E2%80%9D/

I made this last weekend and it was really crispy! Baked crust first, then added toppings. I was worried because they said to cook on 425 on lowest rack, but it didn't burn at all. They say that olive oil makes it crispy. It was so good! I hope the recipe helps, but mostly you can just read what they say about how to make the crust crispy. I used a Teflon pizza pan and made a thin crust as directed. Can't wait to try it again.

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Flip that sucker and nuke it under the broiler sans the parchment paper - watch carefully & don't set off the smoke alarm. This is what my spouse does with the tortillas we make pizzas out of - we like thin crust.

The restaurants I've eaten some crispy gluten free pizza at, will take and serve the thing on a serving pan with lots of little raised bumps, so it has a bit of air under it and moisture is not condensing and making it soggy.

Something like a pizza stone or cast iron, with some olive oil on it and a lot of pre - heat will usually crisp up anything. Don't burn the oil or your hands. I've done quick crusts in cast iron with starting them on the stovetop and then finishing under the broiler, before topping, but technically they are not a classic pizza crust.

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That is the same recipe I use and I have never have trouble with it being doughy or soggy but I do pre-cook it for 15 minutes instead of the 8-10 it says in the directions. I brush the top crust (around the edges) with extra oil when it come out the first time. You can also improve it by not using a watery sauce. My crusts cook much better when I make my own sauce out of tomatoe paste. I make it nice and thick so there is not nearly as much water as some of those canned sauces. I second the advice about pre-sauteing veggies too. They will not only taste better, they will have less water to release onto the pizza crust during cooking. I make my pizzas cheeseless now BUT a tip for if you like cheese is to put some cheese down on the crust FIRST, then put sauce, a little more cheese and then more toppings and a final layer of cheese. My husband worked at a pizza place and this is what they did. The layers hold everything together and the first layer on the crust keeps some of the moisure from the toppings from getting to the crust.

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That is the same recipe I use and I have never have trouble with it being doughy or soggy but I do pre-cook it for 15 minutes instead of the 8-10 it says in the directions. I brush the top crust (around the edges) with extra oil when it come out the first time. You can also improve it by not using a watery sauce. My crusts cook much better when I make my own sauce out of tomatoe paste. I make it nice and thick so there is not nearly as much water as some of those canned sauces. I second the advice about pre-sauteing veggies too. They will not only taste better, they will have less water to release onto the pizza crust during cooking. I make my pizzas cheeseless now BUT a tip for if you like cheese is to put some cheese down on the crust FIRST, then put sauce, a little more cheese and then more toppings and a final layer of cheese. My husband worked at a pizza place and this is what they did. The layers hold everything together and the first layer on the crust keeps some of the moisure from the toppings from getting to the crust.

I never thought about adding cheese as layers...good suggestion! Actually made pizza again on Tues. as my 12-year old granddaughter spent a few days with me and she was dying to make homemade pizza. She just loves to use my KitchenAid stand mixer. :D She measured out all the ingredients (well, she failed the test to separate the egg white and yolk...lol) I did flip the pre-baked crust and baked it a few minutes longer. The pizza crisper pans I bought help a lot, too, when I slipped it off the foil after prebaking and directly on to the pans.

She declared the pizza was fantastic and kept going back for more and more! I used Jules' recipe again and instead of making it 12", we made a slightly thinner 14" crust. It was so good..I cut it in 8 pieces and she ate 4 of them (I had 2 and was full). And no, she is not overweight. She thinks eating gluten-free is pretty terrific even though she doesn't have to eat this way.

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I'm wondering if the olive oil aids the crispiness because olive oil has a low heat tolerance, and breaks down under such baking temperatures (forming free radicals). Anyone try different oils to compare crispiness? A high-heat safflower or sunflower oil can handle the temp without forming free radicals, so that's what I use, and haven't gotten the bottom to get as crispy as I'd like either. However, I find lecithin not only makes a great non-stick coating for the pan, but it seems to go a long way towards a good crispy crust. But as it cools, water condensation starts making it soggy. Next time I think I'll try allowing it to cool on a cooling rack (without the pan). I am also thinking of making it on the stove instead, since it's easy to get things crisp that way.

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