Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
bartfull

Milk Substitute With A Shelf Life?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

A lot of the recipes I see have milk in them. I NEVER liked milk so I hardly ever had any around. When I was eating gluten, most of the things I cooked that required milk did just fine with water. I'm thinking that probably isn't the case with gluten free.

So, I just saw a pancake recipe that calls for a cup of milk. Here in my tiny town in the middle of nowhere, believe it or not, the smallest container of milk available is a half gallon! I don't cook often enough to use it up before it goes bad.

So, is POWDERED milk OK to use in cooking? Is there anything else that can be substituted for milk that either comes in a smaller container, or has a long shelf life?

Oh yeah, and while I'm here, other than Kettle brand, does anyone know of a gluten free potato chip that can be bought in a regular grocery store? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never needed milk, or anything like it, to make gluten-free pancakes. But my preference would be coconut milk. It can be purchased as a powder, or in a can. As for shelf life of the powdered form, I think I'd freeze it if I wasn't going to use it for awhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I normally do not use "milk" in baked goods or pancakes, after making several batches of breads that had some boxed non dairy milk substitute in it, to which I reacted badly. Water is a lot safer.

You can use canned coconut milk and if it's thick, dilute it a bit. There is also this gluten free, non dairy powdered milk substitute called Vance's Dairy Free. If you are dairy tolerant, you can use powdered milk and water. This is what people did routinely back in the day when powdered milk was cheaper than fresh, besides having a longer shelf life. I remember having to use the stuff in home economics classes in junior high school. By the time I was a young adult, powdered milk was no longer a cost savings.

There are also many aseptic packaged, long shelf life boxed milk substitutes available, altho it sounds like you may have to mail order them. There are soy milks (don't recommend this as so many celiacs and gluten intolerants react to soy, so be cautious), rice milks (don't use Rice Dream brand, which is made with barley enzymes and to which many celiacs/glu ints react, inspite of its alleged gluten-free status) and many different types of nut milks, such as almond, hazelnut, etc, and hemp milk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info. As hard as this diet is, it's even harder for someone who is learning to cook after a lifetime of living on junkfood!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yeah, and while I'm here, other than Kettle brand, does anyone know of a gluten free potato chip that can be bought in a regular grocery store? Thanks!

Ruffles chips (plain), Cheetos (plain), Funyuns, Corn Chips (plain) are all gluten free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lay's Stax potato chips are also gluten-free.

ETA: I also like Utz regular potato chips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lay's Stax potato chips are also gluten-free.

ETA: I also like Utz regular potato chips.

I had a reaction with Lay's and then I went to their website and found this:

U.S. Products Not Containing Gluten Ingredients

The Frito-Lay products listed below do not contain wheat, rye, barley or oat ingredients (we include oats in this list as a precaution as oats are often commingled with gluten-containing grains). Please note however, some of the products listed below may be manufactured on the same lines as products that contain gluten. Although our lines are washed between batches, Frito-Lay has not tested these products for gluten content and the ingredients in these products may have come into contact with gluten-containing products prior to manufacturing. Individuals who are sensitive to gluten should take these factors into consideration in consuming these products.

Please note: The information provided pertains only to products made and distributed in the U.S. Products sold in other countries under similar brands may be made using slightly different recipes and ingredients to accommodate local needs and preferences.

There was a long list of their product, including regular Lay's and the Stax. Now, it MIGHT have been the corn oil they cooked them in that did me in, but either way, I can't have them.

I used to love Utz chips when I lived in Connecticut where I could get them. They don't sell them out here. The healthfood store here used to sell Kettle brand and I bought their last bag before they were discontinued. :(

But hey, as long as I'm (finally!) learning to cook, maybe I can learn to make my own!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a reaction with Lay's and then I went to their website and found this:

U.S. Products Not Containing Gluten Ingredients

The Frito-Lay products listed below do not contain wheat, rye, barley or oat ingredients (we include oats in this list as a precaution as oats are often commingled with gluten-containing grains). Please note however, some of the products listed below may be manufactured on the same lines as products that contain gluten. Although our lines are washed between batches, Frito-Lay has not tested these products for gluten content and the ingredients in these products may have come into contact with gluten-containing products prior to manufacturing. Individuals who are sensitive to gluten should take these factors into consideration in consuming these products.

Please note: The information provided pertains only to products made and distributed in the U.S. Products sold in other countries under similar brands may be made using slightly different recipes and ingredients to accommodate local needs and preferences.

There was a long list of their product, including regular Lay's and the Stax. Now, it MIGHT have been the corn oil they cooked them in that did me in, but either way, I can't have them.

I used to love Utz chips when I lived in Connecticut where I could get them. They don't sell them out here. The healthfood store here used to sell Kettle brand and I bought their last bag before they were discontinued. :(

But hey, as long as I'm (finally!) learning to cook, maybe I can learn to make my own!

Lay's Stax are marked gluten-free whereas the other Lay's products are not as far as I know so ???

I don't happen to have any Stax in my pantry so I don't know what the packaging says.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, SA! I'll check it out. If my grocery store carries them, they might be the first thing I try adding back after this elimination diet!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, SA! I'll check it out. If my grocery store carries them, they might be the first thing I try adding back after this elimination diet!

There are several different flavors of Stax but I always seem to buy the plain ones. And I always buy mine from my local Wal-Mart for $1.00 each (they're in containers similar to Pringles, which are not gluten-free).

BTW, depending on what milk you choose and if you only use it for pancakes, you could freeze it in one-cup containers. I buy Lactaid and it has a really long shelf life, which is good for me as I don't use that much milk either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, I never even thought of freezing it. Thanks.

Looks like Stax are made using corn oil. That means I can't have them. The Kettle brand are made with sunflower or safflower oils only. Oh well...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×