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beachbirdie

Do "normal" People Make Gliadin Antibodies?

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Do non-celiac/non-gluten sensitive people make any of the antibodies generally associated with celiac? How much is found in the "normal" population? Do "normals" always test out to "zero"?

Even though the lab ranges always say "positive" is above a certain threshold, wouldn't it make sense that someone with low levels of all the antibodies has some kind of problem with gluten? Or, could it be that a person with low levels of antibodies might simply be in early stages of a progressive condition?

I've been trying to find an answer to this angle of questioning without good result.

Thanks a bunch!

beachbirdie

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I completely agree with your theory and have been trying to research that myself, without finding much at all.

From what I understand, two of the four proteins in wheat are really hard for humans to digest, so i do actually think "normal" folks have some of these antibodies, too, and so i wonder if some scientists in a lab with no patient experience did some statistical calculations and came up with the "over x value" thing. If they could test for antibodies for the other proteins in some way, it might paint a bigger picture of overall intolerance. Research seems lacking, considering the increase in "vague" hard to control disorders like depression and fibromyalgia these days and how the majority of folks are living on a grain(wheat)-based diet (even the health food folks love their whole wheat foods!).

That's just my hypothesis, anyway :)

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I completely agree with your theory and have been trying to research that myself, without finding much at all.

From what I understand, two of the four proteins in wheat are really hard for humans to digest, so i do actually think "normal" folks have some of these antibodies, too, and so i wonder if some scientists in a lab with no patient experience did some statistical calculations and came up with the "over x value" thing. If they could test for antibodies for the other proteins in some way, it might paint a bigger picture of overall intolerance. Research seems lacking, considering the increase in "vague" hard to control disorders like depression and fibromyalgia these days and how the majority of folks are living on a grain(wheat)-based diet (even the health food folks love their whole wheat foods!).

That's just my hypothesis, anyway :)

Thanks so much for your thoughts. It's almost like researchers stopped thinking when they discovered the effects of gluten on some people, and moved to finding a "cure" or a way for celiac/gluten sensitive people to go back to eating it. That seems to be a big mindset; how to allow people to continue with behavior/diet that hurts them, by drugging away the consequences.

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People who eat gluten comfortably can have anti-gliadin (as can non-celiac gluten intolerant folks). It can come and go too. That's why it's not considered a very specific test and doctors have been moving away from it. Normal people do NOT have anti-TTG, anti-endomysial, or anti-deamidated gliadin. Anti-TTG is not specific to celiac and can show up in other inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune disorders. Anti-endomysial and anti-deamidated gliadin are 98% specific to celiac, and many researchers think that most people who have those antibodies and a normal biopsy are in the process of developing celiac disease and have been caught early.

People do not test out at "zero" on any ELISA test. This is because natural antibodies tend to cross-react a little so you always see some degree of background. The reference ranges on the tests are set to reflect the normal background readings. A reading within the reference range is not distinguishable from noise.

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People who eat gluten comfortably can have anti-gliadin (as can non-celiac gluten intolerant folks). It can come and go too. That's why it's not considered a very specific test and doctors have been moving away from it. Normal people do NOT have anti-TTG, anti-endomysial, or anti-deamidated gliadin. Anti-TTG is not specific to celiac and can show up in other inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune disorders. Anti-endomysial and anti-deamidated gliadin are 98% specific to celiac, and many researchers think that most people who have those antibodies and a normal biopsy are in the process of developing celiac disease and have been caught early.

People do not test out at "zero" on any ELISA test. This is because natural antibodies tend to cross-react a little so you always see some degree of background. The reference ranges on the tests are set to reflect the normal background readings. A reading within the reference range is not distinguishable from noise.

Thank you very much! Your explanation makes testing much more understandable, that is exactly what I was looking for and couldn't figure out!

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