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Karmann

Teen Weight Gain Technique/product?

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Hello everyone,

My son was given a "working diagnosis" of celiac disease in March of this year and it's been interesting to say the least. Anyway, we recently realized that he has not gained weight for several months and possibly even years. He is 16 and has always remained in the upper ranges of the weight register for all of his life, but when he began to have some of the symptoms of celiac disease that led to his diagnosis, he remained around the same weight (147 or so) and height (5'10") and has seemed to lose much of his fairly "stocky" stature, formerly being in the upper ranges of the weight and height percentile (80-95%) and now down in the 50 and 70 percents.

So our question is, is there any way to allow him to go back to his projected height and weight by way of gluten-free protein shakes etc.? Or making sure certain food is included in his diet to allow for weight gain once again?

Please help!

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Now that he's gluten-free, eating healthy should help him return to his normal weight. If he's very active, increase his protein, but I don't think those shakes and things are anything more than an expensive way to supplement poor eating habits.

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My son's football coach said the best way to put on muscle he had seen was work out with weights. Then go home and have a glass of milk and a PB sandwich or two.

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Now that he's gluten-free, eating healthy should help him return to his normal weight. If he's very active, increase his protein, but I don't think those shakes and things are anything more than an expensive way to supplement poor eating habits.

I don't think that's a fair statement of fact. Most people who are serious about weight training or getting really fit and developing muscle use protein shakes daily as an addition to a healthy diet. You cannot get enough protein in a normal diet to build muscle mass..or muscle at all if you have under developed muscle from Celiac Disease....unless you want to be constantly eating all day long. They are a useful addition and go down easily for those with still compromised digestive tracts. Just eating gluten free won't promote muscle growth unless you feed the muscle.

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Hello everyone,

My son was given a "working diagnosis" of celiac disease in March of this year and it's been interesting to say the least. Anyway, we recently realized that he has not gained weight for several months and possibly even years. He is 16 and has always remained in the upper ranges of the weight register for all of his life, but when he began to have some of the symptoms of celiac disease that led to his diagnosis, he remained around the same weight (147 or so) and height (5'10") and has seemed to lose much of his fairly "stocky" stature, formerly being in the upper ranges of the weight and height percentile (80-95%) and now down in the 50 and 70 percents.

So our question is, is there any way to allow him to go back to his projected height and weight by way of gluten-free protein shakes etc.? Or making sure certain food is included in his diet to allow for weight gain once again?

Please help!

Can your son do some weight training also? It's a great way to build muscle and will make him much stronger. Along with weight training, protein shakes are one of the better ways to feed muscle because you can't be eating meat or fish all day long. Figure a gram of protein per pound of body weight, per day. Protein shakes provide concentrated protein, without all the cholesterol and enable you to get close to that number. The next best source is fish, then chicken and lastly, red meat. Milk may not work for him as a protein source if he is dairy intolerant due to Celiac.

I wouldn't place too much faith in those wacky growth percentiles doctors love to use. Everyone has their best weight for their height and that's going to differ depending on muscle mass. Plus, at 16, he could hit a growth spurt now that he is going to be absorbing food again well. Don't worry too much...he'll do fine. I was very underweight and had no muscle to speak of when diagnosed and now I am back to normal for my height and have gained muscle through weight training. Good luck!

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Thank you everyone, he has started to drink Boost Plus (and when we ran out, Boost High Protein) and he is feeling better as well as having gained about 3-5 lbs in a few weeks. So the outlook is pretty good right now. Do you guys think that he has any chance at another growth spurt?

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Thank you everyone, he has started to drink Boost Plus (and when we ran out, Boost High Protein) and he is feeling better as well as having gained about 3-5 lbs in a few weeks. So the outlook is pretty good right now. Do you guys think that he has any chance at another growth spurt?

I think he has a chance. I have teen boys so I've seen alot. Some boys just naturally have growth spurts at different times. My boys grew a lot between 12-14. But still gained 1-2 inches between 16 and 18. Make sure he is getting any vitamins he might be deficient in from the inability to absorb them. This is an age where they are putting on bone density so calcium, B vitamins & D are important.

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All of these links are nothing new to those of us who weight train. As someone who actually does this, I will re-iterate that it can be difficult to eat enough food in a day to get the 1 gram of protein per body weight that you need for muscle growth....especially if you are small framed. You can't keep eating eggs everyday as they are not meant to be an everyday food. It can raise cholesterol in some people. Yes, we eat a lot of egg whites but that can get old. The protein shakes are meant to add variety and a boost of protein when you can't consume enough food in the given time period you need to. They aren't meant to replace food.

The other big problem for Celiacs is milk/dairy products. Many of the weight trainers I know drink lots of milk but that won't work for me as I am lactose intolerant also, as are many people.

If some folks can find a way, both physically and financially, to build muscle with the use of food only, that's great but no body builder I know goes without a protein shake to supplement protein intake. Much easier to do when the protein is concentrated. Protein shakes are healthy and one trainer I work out with suffered a bout of cancer when he was a teen and he told me that he wouldn't have survived the treatment without the use of protein shakes.

They are what kept his muscles from wasting away when he couldn't eat. I know I have gotten faster results from using some of the shakes myself, alongside other good quality protein sources. It's up to each person what route they end up going in gaining muscle but to state that protein shakes are an expensive way to supplement poor eating habits is irresponsible and untrue.

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Do you guys think that he has any chance at another growth spurt?

He absolutely does! And the equation for success is fairly simple.

1) Whole Foods that are inherently high in protein should accompany every meal. Low fat chicken sausages at breakfast, egg white omelets, chicken breasts, pork tenderloin, lean beef, etc. Your son's body will get a bigger bang for the buck eating WHOLE Foods instead of protein shakes.

2) All Natural/OrganicYou've obviously learned how to read labels due to his gluten intolerance. In addition to looking for possible gluten culprits, start looking for artificial colors, flavors & preservatives. Have him stay away from those man made chemicals. He's now a few "steps back" from his peers, keep his diet as clean as possible.

3) Rest You don't build muscle when you're in the gym, you tear down those muscle fibers. You repair those fibers on rest days. Never work out with weights 2 days in a row. And, make sure he's getting plenty of sleep.

4) Protein Shakes are still good for in-between meals especially in bulking mode. But, opt for an all natural AND gluten free powder.

5) Work Out Partnerhave him find a buddy to work out with. They can push each other to higher weights AND safely spot each other.

He has some catching up to do, but it CAN be done. I'm living proof after being malnourished for years.

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The thing is if his gut doesn't heal he won't be able to absorb nutrients he needs to grow. So the first thing is to make sure he is strictly 100% gluten-free. Then pile on the meat and protein.

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So the first thing is to make sure he is strictly 100% gluten-free. Then pile on the meat and protein.

Ahhh another Celiac Carnivore. My evening is made. Well, after I fire up the Weber grill for lean meats.

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