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Canola Oil/ Breading For Chicken

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I have been really trying to cut down on the amount of soy that I eat. I decided to switch to canola oil for baking. I have read online that canola oil my or may not be safe for celiacs. Is canola oil gluten free and safe for us? I ditched the soybean oil so hopefully this one is ok. I like olive oil but not for baking.

With that said, what do you use to bread things with? I wonder if stale Udi's would work as breading..or crushed corn or rice chex.

Thanks!

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All the canola oil I am aware of (here in Canada) is gluten-free. Right now I have so many oils on hand it's not even funny (all serve different purposes due to smoking point, flavour, etc.).

What sort of thing will you be breading? Using an eggwash, buttermilk, sour cream, yogurt, etc. allow better adherence. I use my homemade bread heels for breading the odd time (I don't bread much) as well as making them into croutons. You can also use ground certified gluten-free oats (if you can have them), lentils (my favourite), dried mushrooms such as porcini (adds great flavour as well). For those a spice grinder would be best. I use mine often. You can purchase gluten-free crumbs (too bad there is no such thing as authentic gluten-free Panko crumbs - Kinnikinnick has crumbs labeled Panko but that is a total joke). If you have any gluten-free crackers you like you can use those, too, as well as potato chips. Or even pretzels - they are especially good with thick cut bone-in pork chops and rack of lamb. Sometimes I grind nuts such as hazelnuts to add to the pretzels.

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Canola oil is gluten-free.

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I also use finely ground corn chex that I add different spices to depending on what I am cooking. Great for chicken or pork chops.

Also, a light dusting with chick pea flour can add some nice browning and flavor to meat.

I use my bread heels only for only bread crumbs in meatloafs, meatballs etc...

I have used pretzels as a coating on chicken and like it but gluten-free pretzels are hard and it takes a bit to get them small enough to coat with. I only have a mini chopper not a food processor.

happy cooking

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Canola is absolutely gluten-free. All cooking oils are gluten-free unless something's been added, as in the Pam baker's spray.

richard

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I save up the end pieces of Udi's bread, cut it into 1 inch cubes and dry it in the oven at 300 until it is crisp all the way through. Then crumble it for bread crumbs or quickly saute in olive oil and garlic for crutons.

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You can also use ground certified gluten-free oats (if you can have them), lentils (my favourite), dried mushrooms such as porcini (adds great flavour as well). For those a spice grinder would be best.

How do you coat in lentils and what goes well coated in them? I'm intrigued, never heard of it.

Would red lentils work? I bought several pounds of red in bulk and hate their texture cooked (way too mushy), yet still haven't found a breading I like much.

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How do you coat in lentils and what goes well coated in them? I'm intrigued, never heard of it.

Would red lentils work? I bought several pounds of red in bulk and hate their texture cooked (way too mushy), yet still haven't found a breading I like much.

I tend to be an adventurous and experimental cook! :D Some may think it I am OTT but I LOVE it!

Anyway, do you have a spice grinder or food processor? My mortar and pestle does not work to grind the lentils as they are too hard. I grind in my spice grinder - not to the point where it is powdery but still maintains some texture. Red lentils do tend to get mushy but would work for grinding/coating. Are you able to get lentils de puy? They are FABULOUS for grinding (and every other lentil dish). They do not fall apart and therefore are wonderful in soups, braised in red wine with chorizo, etc.

I do not bread much because I prefer to sear in a screaming hot cast iron skillet without and then make pan sauces or whatever but sometimes a nice fine coating can be nice. Do you ever make tempura out of rice flour and club soda? Excellent with many vegetables and seafood.

Ground lentils are lovely on lamb, duck, pheasant and game but if you are not into that it is also nice on chicken (especially flavourful thighs) and pork. It adds a bit of crunch and texture but does not become gummy or mushy like some breading can. Goes nicely with ground porcini and a touch of seasoning. I like to use lentils as they add much-needed fibre as well.

If you do not have a spice grinder and enjoy cooking it is SO worth purchasing. I used mine about six or seven times today to pulverize dried chiles to make some blends and rubs. I also grind all sorts of dried mushrooms, cacao nibs, rice and spices in it. It is one of my favourite things in the kitchen.

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Have you considered rubs for chicken instead of breading? They are super simple and there are literally thousands of combinations and add tons of flavour. (Oh, I forgot to add in my previous response that Parmesan added to breading is very good.)

Anyway, you can do either wet or dry rubs. An example of a wet rub would be chopped rosemary and thyme, crushed garlic, finely minced Thai chile and olive oil. An example of a dry rub would be a BBQ rub which may include some salt, brown sugar, chile powder, garlic salt, a touch of cayenne and mustard powder (which I always do for baby back ribs and let sit for 24 hours). Or how about Creole or jerk?

This wet rub is just one of about 983,401 recipes I have. Very simple and tasty with no wild and crazy ingredients that I am known to use!

http://www.cookstr.com/recipes/wet-rub-for-meats-and-poultry

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