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ravenwoodglass

Celiac Cost Me Everything

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Raven (((hugs)))

I too have a strained relationship with my family, my older two children included thanks to illness. I can only imagine the pain of losing a beloved pet. I have a dog and she's been a lifesaver. Totally non judgemental, ever loving, and always pleased to see you, even when you are crying.

Be kind to yourself <3

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Hi Ravenwood,

You are not alone. Many here love you, and you are loved by all of Nature around you. Losing a dog you feel so close to has to be tough. When I lost my cat Omar I thought I was going to die. Its hard when family is not a real family. I know what its like to feel that perhaps someday they will come around, but cannot in any way shape or form count on it. Instead there is just bitterness and animosity on their part.

When you are up to it, I suggest you find some interest and pursue it -- make new friends, create a new life--and eventually your friends may become your new family, as many are here. I don't know how old you are, but it doesn't matter. One can always begin again, even if you are 90. I am 62 and didn't figure out that I needed to be off all trace glutens until a little over 3 1/2 years ago. I was apparently originally diagnosed when I was 4 or 5 months old, but was never told until after I figured it all out.

There is much to be bitter about. All the diseases, the missed opportunities etc. I am no longer young. However life goes on and I am learning there is much I still can do. Like write about my experiences for one thing. And reach out to new people. Perhaps create a local gluten intolerant support group. I like the idea the man from Louisiana told us all about of an emotional release support group for celiacs. Many hugs dear. You are a real trouper!

Bea

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Raven you are a pathfinder for those who feel lost. True friends don't abandon each other....being diagnosed has opened doors to different types of friendships and we thank you for your much needed guidance. So sorry about your pal.

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Thank you everyone. I have lost dogs before but for some reason it didn't hit me as bad as losing this one. Perhaps because my kids were still young and at home and needing me. Perhaps because it was so sudden. He stopped wanting to eat Friday night and his breathing was very labored. I thank God for my vet clinic as I was able to call yesterday when he got real weak and he didn't have to suffer until today. He was bleeding internally and very old. His passing was easy and the vet was kind.

It has been a hard month or so, as they say bad luck comes in threes and Pooh passing was number 3 so perhaps things will turn around.

Your replies have been overwhelming in their kindness and it helps a great deal to know that people care. I emailed my DD this morning and told her what happened as I only left messages to call me back yesterday. She works long hours and I know she will call when she can. Families just don't seem to be like they used to be. Everyone moves so far away and gets so busy with their lives that it is easy to forget the folks you left behind. I am mid-fifties so I am old enough to remember families that all lived close and getting together at Grandmas or Aunties was something done every Sunday. I miss those days and it seems many others here do also.

Thank you all so much for being here when I needed you.

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I too am so very sorry for your loss! There is nothing worse than having your constant, very best buddy leave your side. I hope you begin to feel better soon! It will get better!

I too thank thank you for all your knowledge and support on this forum, I frequently think of your words during the day and I have begun this new gluten free lifestyle.

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There was a piece on NPR about a local politician who was born to a native american woman, but adopted by a white family. She went through some very difficult times, and somehow ended up in front of the tribal council after her dad died (mom was already gone). She apologized for coming to them and said something about not having a family. The tribal elder said "you don't need a family, you have a tribe".

That's kinda what I feel like this group is. A group of people you were born into, some better, some worse, but all connected. So don't worry when you feel alone, or your family isn't supportive, or you need to grieve with people who will grieve with you. You don't need a family, you have us, you have your tribe.

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Raven,

I really like what Jestgar said about "tribe"; I do feel here on the Earth Plane or the "Pain Plane' as I sometimes refer to it, we all have family and "chosen" family- those who we just feel more comfortable with and at home with. I come from a huge French and Greek family and there is a ton of love but with SOME, not always true understanding and compassion. My own kids (21 and 18) I know love me to pieces but can at times sound "hard" with me or act selfishly but I do realize that's where they're at right now. I think what you are experiencing with older kids seems much more difficult and painful and I wonder what unsolved issues they have that most likely have absolutely nothing to do with you yet you still bear the brunt of their long hurts or frustrations or missed opportunities... not fair, but common.

It's nice to read so many caring people's comments to you though I know it won't bring your beloved dog back. I just have to say, having buried so many of my beloved companions, I really didn't think I would get another cat after Sam died in February. (I had 7 at the time...plus 3 dogs and a rabbit) But, through a ridiculous chain of events that if one were to put in a novel (unless it was written by Gabriel Garcia Marquez...) no one would even believe, we met "Marvin", a foolish one-year old male tiger cat who has been slowly and entertainingly healing our household. I am sure Sam sent him.

Absolutely every one of my over 30 animals, with the exception of one little tiger cat back in the day, came from the shelter. They are the animals to get, I think. Or a few just found their way to our house, like some sort of 101 Dalmation circuitous calling chain... I don't know.....

Anyway, sorry, this is way too long; I just think opening your heart to the eventual possibility of another dog would be a good idea. And see what the universe then brings.

With kindness,

lisa

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I would love to see a picture of Pooh, if possible. We are all sending the best to you and him. I've been thinking about you all day and hope tomorrow is better. So sad for you!

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Ravenwood, I'm so sorry about the loss of your beloved Pooh. It is so hard to lose a good friend. As many people have already stated, there are all different kinds of friends. You have so many on this board alone. And, you have been a great friend to more people than you can imagine. It's not just the posters, but the lurkers too that have benefited from your advice. You are always kind and gentle in your responses and so many people appreciate you.

I will say some prayers for you and send some positive thoughts your way.

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Hi Raven,

I am so sad and heartbroken to hear of your recent trials and feeling like you are all alone. I know how difficult it must be to lose a furry companion - one who saw you through thick and thin. Some day you will be able to be happy to have had him in your life, instead of sad that he had to leave. But...it will take time. I know it took me a long time to open my heart again, knowing that I would likely be left behind again and having to say goodbye. In the end, however, having them in your life is worth the pain you must face when they leave it. I'm so glad that you both had each other because I am certain that he was just as grateful to have had you as your were to have had him. Hugs, dear!

As to your family, I'm so sorry that your children are being so self-centered. Unfortunately, that seems to be the way things are nowadays. I don't know how old they are, but I know in my 20s, I was very self-absorbed and now, with kids, it hasn't gotten much better. :(

Last, I read a saying much like the one that you just posted. When I read it, it spoke to me in a way that changed my attitude. I'll give you a tiny bit of background: I was diagnosed with an incurable liver disease about 4 years ago. The statistics aren't good and the only real "treatment" is a liver transplant, but you have to be on your deathbed in order to get one. And there is a likelihood of the disease attacking the new liver as well. Even with the transplant, the statistics aren't comforting. So, on the PSC board, someone wrote, "I'd rather die living my life than live my life waiting to die." I had been going through a lot of emotions after my diagnosis and that was exactly what I needed to read at that time. And, I've chosen to live my life with that one statement in mind. I don't always succeed, but mostly I'm doing a pretty good job. That isn't to say that I don't get down or scared or defeated, because I do, but eventually, I pull up my bootstraps and decide to ignore the statistics and work my way on being an outlier. I hope you can find the strength to do the same. We only get ONE CHANCE at this life. You've been given a new life with a gluten-free diet. You CAN focus on the fact that so much time was wasted, OR you can focus on the fact that you've been given a new lease on life. You can choose to take it and run with it. What is done, is done. There is nothing you can do to change your past, but you CAN change your future and how you live it!! YOU have done just that for so many others here on this board, and I hope it's a gift that you can give yourself. You deserve it. And Only You can make the choice to do it.

I want to thank you for being such an inspiration to me and always offering support here. Yes, so many of us DO care about you. But what you should also be seeing is not only do we care, but YOU MATTER. YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF OTHERS FOR THE BETTER!!! That's all many of us ever want. Is to know that it MATTERED that we ever lived. That we made the world or someone's life just a little bit better. And you can see a testament to the difference you've made right here in this thread!

Much love and hugs!

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So sad to hear about your little friend's passing.

You remind me that I spent years as a younger person glossing over my mom's "mystery" symptoms, I guess since the doctor couldn't find anything wrong with her I just didn't take it as seriously as it was. I'm sure we weren't there for her when it really mattered. How wrong we all were, and I feel badly that I didn't get a chance to tell her that I understand.

So I'm telling you. I understand all of it, and I'm so sorry.

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You remind me that I spent years as a younger person glossing over my mom's "mystery" symptoms, I guess since the doctor couldn't find anything wrong with her I just didn't take it as seriously as it was. I'm sure we weren't there for her when it really mattered. How wrong we all were, and I feel badly that I didn't get a chance to tell her that I understand.

Me too. For years I pushed my Mom to go back to working as a secretary instead of doing housekeeping and taking in ironing. It wasn't until I was unable to do anything without a bathroom close by and lived in constant pain that I understood. I know my kids love me. They just don't understand how much I need to hear from them and likely won't until I am gone and they have children of their own.

I'm feeling a bit better today but still have to go through the cabinet and pull out his unused food to take to a shelter or my local food bank. I have a gift certificate for a picture framing and I am taking my favorite picture of him and a lock of his hair in this morning to be framed. It is the picture I posted. Still can't move his pillow from beside my bed though....

While I wish I could have found a job sooner in a way I am glad I haven't as I don't think I could deal with it right now. I have my volunteer work later this week though to keep me busy and by then I should be able to face the world without crying. Taking my little guy for walks at the lake gave me the strength to leave the house and fight the agoraphobia and I am going to fight like hell not to backslide. He was my comfort and my best friend in a way that I think only dog lovers can understand. And to say my kids are not dog lovers is an understatement.

Thank you everyone for your support. It does help more than you know. I know he will be waiting for me to join him and many other of my past loves someday. He will be the one running the fastest across the Rainbow Bridge.

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Just wanted to check in on you today and still sending positive energy your way.

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Raven,

Thank you for posting the picture of pooh :) Oh My Goodness, what a SWEET baby :wub:

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I agree-a beautiful dog Pooh was! He'll always be there in your heart. He's still with you in ways that count.

He just might also encourage you to find room in your heart for a new companion later on down the road. You will know when the time is right. For now its appropriate to mourn and be glad his big spirit shared his time with you.

Bea

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While I understand and respect the suggestion of (after a period of grieving ) adopting another dog I also feel that in my case that will not happen.

My BEST buddy Gabe is 11 and has health issues. MY heart breaks just thinking about the day I will lose him.I have decided that once he is gone I will not have another dog.I have kittys and while not the same they will help.

I am 54 years old and have health issues. I do not feel that with my life issues (housing,work,health ect..)it would be fair to bring another dog into my life .

I will treasure every moment I have with Gabe but he is the last dog I will have. That saddens me to say that because He has brought so much joy and love to my life but I feel that is the responsible thing for me to do at this point of my life .

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Ravenwood, I just got on and saw your post about your beloved friend Pooh, I am sending you out a big hug, and I will be thinking about you. I agree with the other posts that said you are always there for others here sending out wonderful advice and words of encouragement, I know I am very thankful for all you give to myself and others. My sympathies go out to you, I also have two little dogs who have always been there for me, on my good days they dance and play with me and on my bad days they snuggle and care for me. Thinking about you and sending out good thoughts, take care my friend.

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Sorry to hear about your loss Ravenwood. Dogs are great companions, they have such fun doing simple things. Chewing your shoes, biting the mailman, chasing cars, barking at the moon! Woofing at the neighbors and anyone who dares to knock on the door. Helping the cats eat their dinner, cleaning up spills and dropped food bits, running in circles, shedding fur, laying in your lap, eating furniture, fetching sticks (the smarter ones), and licking your hand. What's not to like? :) Kids aren't good for many of those things. I hope you feel better thinking about the fun things your pup liked to do. Sounds to me like he had a good life and a loving mom to take care of him.

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I'm your friend. I remember some long emails that went back and forth between us when I was a newbie. You helped me so much. You are an amazing and intelligent women. Thank you for helping me back then, I'm here for you. You know, my sis remembers you from several years ago. You helped her as a newbie as well. (((((((hugs)))). You are important and valued to us on this forum. Sending love your way. :wub:

P.S. So sorry about your little doggie.

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I so do understand. My real hard symptoms didn't appear until 2 years ago and I still didn't know my problem but I would say I have had it for years and I think the one thing I can reflect on is how exhausted, overwhelmed, and while trying to be the patient caring one I was fighting a terrible irritability inside myself trying to raise 5 kids with little input from my husband. There were days I just would lose it and I would feel so bad. 4 of my adult children are adults now and trying to find themselves in their own adult world. I realize the 20's are a tough learning time as I was once in their shoes but I hope I was never as disrespectful to my parents have my children have been towards us, me especially. It does break my heart so I know what you mean when you say you call and there is no answer. I don't get a reply to my emails nor do I get thank yous for gifts I send.

My problems with gluten took a real ugly stand in my life this past Feb....I was lready stressed and had been stressed for quite some time, my grandfather had died which brought out some real weird issues with my family. I got so so sick I was hardly functioning. I was making it thru the days and trying not to burden my family but I really felt I was sinking. I felt I was driving my husband nuts and my mom told me if I wouldn't obsess I would be fine. My friends couldn't understand because they had not even heard of celiac before and could not relate to what I was delaing with. I felt very alone, and like you I felt all I had was my career (I work with kids and being in their innocense some days was the only joyful part of my day) and my animals who were always happy to see me.

I ended up seeking a counselor to help me thru. There was alot going on but I really needed someone to talk about my health with, someone I felt would listen and understand. Whether my counselor was really interested in what I was going htru or not she did listen and she has helped me alot.

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I ended up seeking a counselor to help me thru.

I may have to go back to mine. I am finding it hard to eat without my little guy to share my food with. Pulling back into my driveway is torture as he was always looking for me sitting on the back of my couch at the window. I took his food to a no kill shelther yesterday and spent a couple hours there petting the dogs and the cats and talking to the kind woman who was leading me through their facility about him. I can't think of taking another dog buddy home right now as none will ever be as good a dog as Pooh was. He never chewed furniture or shoes or did any of those annoying things most dogs do. He was such a big part of my life for so long. I know this pain will dull someday and I am taking one day at a time right now. It hasn't even been a week yet and it is so hard to not cry constantly when I am home alone. I hope we are busy in the food bank tommorrow but I know that when the day is done that little face won't be waiting for me. He always knew when I was coming home and if I was late I could see his little head sleeping through the window as he would fall asleep waiting for my car to pull in drive.

Since traveling will be easier I thought maybe planning a trip to see my kids would give me something to take my mind off things but my kids haven't called although my DD sent an email saying 'sorry about THE DOG' and said she would try to call this weekend. I don't know how they can be so cruel. It does help a bit to hear that others are dealing with the same sort of thing with their adult children but I still long for those phone calls that rarely come.

Thank you all for your kind words. This board gives me a purpose for being here on earth. It helps knowing that I have been able to help others in some small way as it makes me feel less worthless.

I will survive but I just feel so empty right now. It is at a point where the pain is not just mental but physical. I just hurt all over. I don't know what I would do without my kitties and you guys. Thanks for being there for me when noone else is.

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I completely understand your physical pain as well as emotional pain over losing Pooh. I had to put my big boy boxer Boozer down and everyone said, "Get another dog right away." I just couldn't do it. It took me two whole years to consider another dog and I got a pretty boxer girl, Peaches. As we were driving her home and she was crying in the little crate... I was bawling w/ her thinking, "What have I just done?? I've brought this little girl into my life and I will surely outlive her!" She is the best dog I've ever had and NOW I know that I will never be w/o a dog again. I peek around on Craigslist and places for boxer girls cause I feel certain I'll have to get another long before Peaches gets old.

I also get the adult kid thing too. Your travel plans sound like a great idea.

(((((hugs))))

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I may have to go back to mine. I am finding it hard to eat without my little guy to share my food with. Pulling back into my driveway is torture as he was always looking for me sitting on the back of my couch at the window. I took his food to a no kill shelther yesterday and spent a couple hours there petting the dogs and the cats and talking to the kind woman who was leading me through their facility about him. I can't think of taking another dog buddy home right now as none will ever be as good a dog as Pooh was. He never chewed furniture or shoes or did any of those annoying things most dogs do. He was such a big part of my life for so long. I know this pain will dull someday and I am taking one day at a time right now. It hasn't even been a week yet and it is so hard to not cry constantly when I am home alone. I hope we are busy in the food bank tommorrow but I know that when the day is done that little face won't be waiting for me. He always knew when I was coming home and if I was late I could see his little head sleeping through the window as he would fall asleep waiting for my car to pull in drive.

Since traveling will be easier I thought maybe planning a trip to see my kids would give me something to take my mind off things but my kids haven't called although my DD sent an email saying 'sorry about THE DOG' and said she would try to call this weekend. I don't know how they can be so cruel. It does help a bit to hear that others are dealing with the same sort of thing with their adult children but I still long for those phone calls that rarely come.

Thank you all for your kind words. This board gives me a purpose for being here on earth. It helps knowing that I have been able to help others in some small way as it makes me feel less worthless.

I will survive but I just feel so empty right now. It is at a point where the pain is not just mental but physical. I just hurt all over. I don't know what I would do without my kitties and you guys. Thanks for being there for me when noone else is.

Raven,

I am so sorry for your loss.

Forgive me if I am completely wrong in sharing this but I feel I have to give you another perspective on your relationship with your kids. I'm one of those adult children that moved far away from home at the age of 18 for college and never went back. You're about the same age as my mom and I feel like you are a board mom here--always helping everyone even if the question has been asked a hundred times before. My relationship with my parents was never really bad but it was never good either. My mom had a lot of emotional breakdowns and physical weaknesses that at the time I thought was just a part of getting older or a part of her personality. I now am certain most of her issues are due to undiagnosed celiac. Anyway, when I went off to college at first I called my parents every week (or they called me if I didn't call) but as the years wore on, I got busy and my memory got really, really bad from this illness. I couldn't remember if I had called them recently or I thought I had talked to them but I hadn't called in months. My memory for that type of thing was bad and I was always tired, always needing to sleep when I wasn't working or eating. Now I'm better and I know when I haven't called them but I've also realized that in my really bad years when I was too sick to remember to call them they also didn't call me. They never asked how I was doing or thought to keep trying to call me when I stopped calling them. My mom even got mad at me for not sending out Christmas and Birthday cards when I was so sick I didn't know what day it was. It really hurt me for a long time that they had no clue what was going on in my life. For a while I didn't care about calling them and didn't care if they called me. I can see myself screening my calls just like you think you daughter does. I am still in the process of "forgiving" them for all I went through in my childhood. Because I was completely emotionally scarred from my mom not having a fully functioning mind and body all though my childhood--whether it was her fault or not I have to forgive them to have a relationship with them that's not strained. I don't know the context of how your daughter said she "forgives" you for being sick all those years. I don't know how she meant it. To me "forgiving" means I am going to overlook the pain that was caused (no matter if it was intentional or not) and I want to move forward with a relationship. Bottom line may be that your daughter wants a relationship with you even if she is not showing it by calling you. Relationships are two way things and they take a lot of work. I know you are hurting right now and you wish your kids would reach out and comfort you. But it may be that your kids need you to reach out to them just as much. I think you should keep calling and try to visit them if you can. Get in their lives and see how they are really doing. I seem to remember something about your daughter being diagnosed but not taking the diet seriously? Sorry if I have you confused with another poster. But if that's the case maybe she's dealing with symptoms that she thinks is just stress or memory issues of her own? Whatever the case, she likely needs you just as much as you need her.

Again, sorry if I'm completely wrong and projecting too much. But I just saw so much of similar realtionship with my own parents that has been strained due to health issues that I had to comment. Don't give up on a relationship with them!

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Ravenwood - I changed my Avatar to my guy, Fetch, in honor of yours. I hope it brings you a little smile.

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Raven,

I am so sorry for your loss.

Forgive me if I am completely wrong in sharing this but I feel I have to give you another perspective on your relationship with your kids. I'm one of those adult children that moved far away from home at the age of 18 for college and never went back. You're about the same age as my mom and I feel like you are a board mom here--always helping everyone even if the question has been asked a hundred times before. My relationship with my parents was never really bad but it was never good either. My mom had a lot of emotional breakdowns and physical weaknesses that at the time I thought was just a part of getting older or a part of her personality. I now am certain most of her issues are due to undiagnosed celiac. Anyway, when I went off to college at first I called my parents every week (or they called me if I didn't call) but as the years wore on, I got busy and my memory got really, really bad from this illness. I couldn't remember if I had called them recently or I thought I had talked to them but I hadn't called in months. My memory for that type of thing was bad and I was always tired, always needing to sleep when I wasn't working or eating. Now I'm better and I know when I haven't called them but I've also realized that in my really bad years when I was too sick to remember to call them they also didn't call me. They never asked how I was doing or thought to keep trying to call me when I stopped calling them. My mom even got mad at me for not sending out Christmas and Birthday cards when I was so sick I didn't know what day it was. It really hurt me for a long time that they had no clue what was going on in my life. For a while I didn't care about calling them and didn't care if they called me. I can see myself screening my calls just like you think you daughter does. I am still in the process of "forgiving" them for all I went through in my childhood. Because I was completely emotionally scarred from my mom not having a fully functioning mind and body all though my childhood--whether it was her fault or not I have to forgive them to have a relationship with them that's not strained. I don't know the context of how your daughter said she "forgives" you for being sick all those years. I don't know how she meant it. To me "forgiving" means I am going to overlook the pain that was caused (no matter if it was intentional or not) and I want to move forward with a relationship. Bottom line may be that your daughter wants a relationship with you even if she is not showing it by calling you. Relationships are two way things and they take a lot of work. I know you are hurting right now and you wish your kids would reach out and comfort you. But it may be that your kids need you to reach out to them just as much. I think you should keep calling and try to visit them if you can. Get in their lives and see how they are really doing. I seem to remember something about your daughter being diagnosed but not taking the diet seriously? Sorry if I have you confused with another poster. But if that's the case maybe she's dealing with symptoms that she thinks is just stress or memory issues of her own? Whatever the case, she likely needs you just as much as you need her.

Again, sorry if I'm completely wrong and projecting too much. But I just saw so much of similar realtionship with my own parents that has been strained due to health issues that I had to comment. Don't give up on a relationship with them!

I will never stop reaching out to my kids. I try not to call more than once a month because I know they are busy and they do eventually call me back.

I think it is hard because we were so close when they were younger. It doesn't help that they both ignore their diagnosis but I don't mention anything about it anymore. It is a very taboo subject and is just not brought up. I pray it won't take them becoming as sick as I was before they realize they really do need the diet. It is hard when I was always there for them when they were growing up and it doesn't help any that I have no other family to reach out to. They will always be a very important part of my life as they were my reason to keep living for years. My being ill was very hard on both of them but especially my DD as she lived full time with me while her brother went to live with his Dad as a teen although we saw each other daily he never knew how sick I really was. My DD knew about the hours spent nightly and daily in the bathroom in agony and I think it is what contributed to her having an occupation in health care. She was even the one who wanted me to get Pooh when I had complications after surgery but I don't think either of them understand the deep love one can have for a pet or the pain that comes when losing one who has been with you and been your best friend for years. I hope someday we will have a closer relationship although I know it will never be as close as it was when they were little. I am not angry with them although it may come across like that but I am hurt. I do understand but I don't think they know how much I need to just talk to them about nothing, if you know what I mean.

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    Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development.  A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease.
    The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha,  Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle.
    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/14/2018 - If you’re looking for a simple, nutritious and exciting alternative to standard spaghetti and tomato sauce, look no further than this delicious version that blends ripe plum tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, basil, and firm sliced ricotta to deliver a tasty, memorable dish.
    Ingredients:
    12 ounces gluten-free spaghetti 5 or 6 ripe plum tomatoes ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, crushed ¾ teaspoons crushed red pepper ¼ cup chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Kosher salt and black pepper ⅓ cup pecorino Romano cheese, grated ½ cup firm ricotta, shaved with peeler Directions:
    Finely chop all but one of the tomatoes; transfer to large bowl with olive oil and ¼ teaspoon salt.
    Cook spaghetti until al dente or desired firmness, and drain, reserving ¼ cup cooking water. 
    Meanwhile, chop remaining tomato, and place in food processor along with garlic, red pepper, and ½ teaspoon salt; puree until smooth. 
    Gently stir mixture into the bowl of chopped tomatoes.
    Add cooked spaghetti, basil and parsley to a large bowl.
    Toss in tomato mixture, adding some reserved pasta water, if needed. 
    Spoon pasta into bowls and top with Romano cheese, as desired.

    Jean Duane
    Celiac.com 07/13/2018 - I went to a friend’s home for dinner.  A few days before, she called and asked me what I could eat.  I asked her what she was planning to make, and she said she was grilling meats with side dishes.  I said, “Great.  Please just grill a piece of chicken for me with salt and pepper, and I’ll be happy to bring a side.” She said, “No need to bring a side.  I’ve got this.” When I arrived, she greeted me and said, “I spent all day cooking tonight’s dinner so you can eat it. Hey would you just check this salad dressing to see if it is OK for you?” I looked at the ingredients and it contained gluten and dairy, both of which I cannot eat.  Then I glanced around the kitchen and saw evidence of wheat cross-contamination, including buns being toasted on the grill, and gluten-containing barbeque sauce spilling on the grill where my “clean” chicken was cooking. She had other guests to tend to, and I couldn’t offer instruction or read the ingredients of everything she used in the meal. 
    At social gatherings, I’ve been challenged too by those who ask if I am really “allergic,” or just eating gluten free as a “fad.” I’ve been told many times by hosts and hostesses that, “a little won’t hurt you,” or “everything in moderation,” or “if it is made with loving hands, it is good for you to eat.”  Of course, all of this is bunk for those with food allergies or celiac disease.  A little bit may kill us, and whether made with loving hands or not, it will certainly make us sick. 
    Those of us with food allergies and/or celiac disease walk a tightrope with friends and relatives. The old rules of etiquette just don’t work anymore.  We don’t want to insult anybody, we don’t want to be isolated, and we also don’t want to risk our health by eating foods that may contain ingredients we cannot tolerate.  So what do we do? 
    Etiquette books advise us to eat what is put in front of us when we are guests in someone’s home. They caution us at all costs not to insult our hostess. Rather, we are instructed to compliment the hostess on her good cooking, flavor combinations, and food choices.  But when foods are prepared in a cross-contaminated environment with ingredients we are allergic to, we cannot follow the old social constructs that do not serve us.  We need to work together to rewrite the rules, so that we can be included in social gatherings without fear of cross-contamination, and without offending anyone.
    Let’s figure out how to surmount these social situations together.  
    Each edition of this column will present a scenario, and together, we’ll determine appropriate, polite, and most importantly, safe ways to navigate this tricky gluten-free/food allergies lifestyle in a graceful way.  If someone disagrees with our new behavior patterns, we can refer them to this column and say, “Here are the new rules for those of us with food allergies or celiac disease.”  When we are guests in someone’s home, we can give them links to this column so they understand the plight we are faced with, bite after bite. Perhaps this will help those of us living with us to understand, be more compassionate, and accepting of our adaptations to keep ourselves safe. 
    This column will present a scenario such as the one above, and ask that you comment on how you would navigate it. Let’s talk about it. Let’s share ideas.  Using the example above, here’s the scenario for this issue:
    What would you do?
    Your kind-hearted friend invites you to dinner and insists on cooking for you.  You arrive and the first thing she says is, “I’ve spent all day making this for you. Oh, I bought this salad dressing for you, but you might want to read the ingredients first.”  You do, and it contains malt vinegar.  You look around the kitchen and notice evidence of cross-contamination in the rest of the meal.  What do you do? 
    Please comment below and feel free to share the tricky scenarios that you’ve encountered too.  Let’s discuss how to surmount these social situations.  What would you do?