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Jaqui Karr's Celiac Books

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I just found 2 new celiac disease books via Amazon. They are both by Jaqui Karr. One is called

"Celiac Disease: Safe/Unsafe Food List and Essential Information On Living With A Gluten Free Diet"

and the other is called "Gluten Safe & Unsafe Ingredient List: the fundamental pocket guide for Celiacs"

I am tempted to buy them via Amazon as the reviews are excellent and it looks like she really knows what she's talking about. She seems to edge on extreme caution. She says she doesn't believe rice and corn to be safe. And that caramel color and vinegars can be a problem. I thought that this was pretty outdated information. But the reviews seem to think that she is much more accurate in describing products and foods than most books.

Has anyone read these books? If so, what are your thoughts?

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I just found 2 new celiac disease books via Amazon. They are both by Jaqui Karr. One is called

"Celiac Disease: Safe/Unsafe Food List and Essential Information On Living With A Gluten Free Diet"

and the other is called "Gluten Safe & Unsafe Ingredient List: the fundamental pocket guide for Celiacs"

I am tempted to buy them via Amazon as the reviews are excellent and it looks like she really knows what she's talking about. She seems to edge on extreme caution. She says she doesn't believe rice and corn to be safe. And that caramel color and vinegars can be a problem. I thought that this was pretty outdated information. But the reviews seem to think that she is much more accurate in describing products and foods than most books.

Has anyone read these books? If so, what are your thoughts?

I haven't read these books but would not buy any book that had such outdated information. Just because she doesn't believe corn and rice aren't safe doesn't mean she is right. Many, many Celiacs eat corn and rice without any issues so I have no idea why she would say that. Sounds like she has based her book on personal opinion and not true science.

Ditto for caramel color and vinegar. The only vinegar that is deemed unsafe for Celiacs is malt vinegar. Otherwise both are gluten free, unless a person has an allergy to them.

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Yeah, I can't tell if she's being overly paranoid about those things. The vinegar and caramel color seem like really outdated info. She is a Celiac and a dietician but that still doesn't mean she knows it all. However, all the reviews on Amazon have been excellent regarding her books and they are about $11.95 each. I just don't want to buy them and realize that I wasted my money and just get overly paranoid...

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Yeah, I can't tell if she's being overly paranoid about those things. The vinegar and caramel color seem like really outdated info. However, all the reviews on Amazon have been excellent regarding her books and they are about $11.95 each.

I haven't bought the book, but there's a chance she has a point. Really depends on how she approaches it, I'd expect, yes?

Is she having an issue with wheat derived vinegar and caramel coloring? If so, she's got a point, because processing the gluten OUT of these isn't all that's a concern. These would also both be ingredients that are processed in facilities that also process wheat. That's an issue for some celiacs, although if it's not one for you, then no worries.

Rice and corn tend to fall into that category, too, unless they are specifically processed to be gluten free.

A recent study ( http://www.suite101.com/news/celiac-disease-diet-study-many-gluten-free-grains-contaminated-a243716 ) was looking at 'naturally' gluten free grains and flours and whether they were actually gluten free, according to the 20ppm standard. White rice flour was one of the flours that tested over 20ppm. So even if rice and corn aren't automatically an issue, they are still ingredients to pay attention to due to processing cross-contamination, I'd imagine.

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I haven't read these books but would not buy any book that had such outdated information. Just because she doesn't believe corn and rice aren't safe doesn't mean she is right. Many, many Celiacs eat corn and rice without any issues so I have no idea why she would say that. Sounds like she has based her book on personal opinion and not true science.

Ditto for caramel color and vinegar. The only vinegar that is deemed unsafe for Celiacs is malt vinegar. Otherwise both are gluten free, unless a person has an allergy to them.

I have not read the books, either, but just wanted to add that I DID see seasoned rice vinegar lately in a specialty ethnic store that had "WHEAT" on the label. Just something to be aware of!

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Sigh. That's why I'm so conflicted :( I don't get any symptoms if I'm glutened so I can't tell whether I'm continuing to accidentally consume small amounts of gluten. And I really don't know how sensitive I am to minute amounts of gluten because of the lack of a reaction. the only way that I have been able to measure my progress with with blood tests to check my antibodies. My last blood test was in April and it showed that my antibodies were still very elevated and I was still quite sick. I will be getting my blood tested again in Oct and I've been much more picky about my diet. But I just don't know if this is stuff I need to be concerned about or not. It's great not to get sick if I accidentally ingest gluten, but on the other hand, I don't know if I'm continuing to poison myself with minute amounts of gluten.

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Sigh. That's why I'm so conflicted :( I don't get any symptoms if I'm glutened so I can't tell whether I'm continuing to accidentally consume small amounts of gluten. And I really don't know how sensitive I am to minute amounts of gluten because of the lack of a reaction. the only way that I have been able to measure my progress with with blood tests to check my antibodies. My last blood test was in April and it showed that my antibodies were still very elevated and I was still quite sick. I will be getting my blood tested again in Oct and I've been much more picky about my diet. But I just don't know if this is stuff I need to be concerned about or not. It's great not to get sick if I accidentally ingest gluten, but on the other hand, I don't know if I'm continuing to poison myself with minute amounts of gluten.

I can relate! I have never had an obvious reaction to gluten so have found it tough. However, my very recent bloodwork shows my antibodies are now NEGATIVE rather than off the charts positive so I have been doing well! That is after five months of being uber strict so just keep on doing the very best you can! :)

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I have not read the books, either, but just wanted to add that I DID see seasoned rice vinegar lately in a specialty ethnic store that had "WHEAT" on the label. Just something to be aware of!

I think most people who take Celiac disease seriously would know to check the label of anything bought in an ethnic specialty store because it most likely would not originate in the States. Other than that, the only vinegar we have to be concerned about would be malt vinegar. The amount of people who may react to distilled vinegars is pretty low, otherwise most celiac organizations worth their salt would bring this subject to everyone's attention and list distilled vinegars as questionable for some. They don't so any book saying that mainstream vinegar isn't safe is outdated.

Ditto for corn and rice. It's easy enough to find dedicated facilities to buy gluten-free grains from so these should not be a worry, unless you have a problem with them which is not celiac related. It's pretty amazing the vast difference in information you can find in books on this subject and it's no wonder people are confused.

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The amount of people who may react to distilled vinegars is pretty low, otherwise most celiac organizations worth their salt would bring this subject to everyone's attention and list distilled vinegars as questionable for some.

I have to agree and I am one of the rare celiacs that do have problems with distilled gluten grains. If someone is having continued problems or continues to have elevated blood work then maybe drop it for a bit and see if that helps but most will tolerate distilled gluten just fine.

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thanks for all your comments so far...has anyone read these books at all?

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I have not read those books. It sounds that they may have misinformation on some things.

I recommend Shelley Case's book, which I have read. It is full of practical, realistic advice; recipes; and sources of gluten-free food. For more info, visit her site here. She lives in Canada, and serves on the advisory board of the Canadian Celiac Association. Her writings cover the United States very well. In my opinion, if you live in North America and only want to buy one book, this is the book to buy.

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My dietician whom I see in Chicago, Lori Rowell, said that Jaqui Karr's books are Australian and that Australia has very different standards about gluten-free than the US does. So that probably explains why some of her information doesn't seem to gel with the info that I've gotten. I do have Shelley Case's book. It's a very good book, but quite technical. I own many Celiac books and I like "Living with Celiac Disease" and "Celiac Disease for Dummies" the best. Also like Jax Peters Lowell's "the gluten-free Bible" although there are some real discrepancies when it comes to that book, I think. It's also rather outdated.

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My dietician whom I see in Chicago, Lori Rowell, said that Jaqui Karr's books are Australian and that Australia has very different standards about gluten-free than the US does.

Oh, yes, that would explain it. The different rules would affect a lot - much more restrictive definition for gluten free - and then wheat is used as a derivative for many more products in Australia than it is in the USA, as well. I imagine her book has a LOT of products that are no good that would be different here.

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I'm so glad to have found this out before buying these books and then getting all paranoid. Not that I have anything against Australia (I'd love to go there someday!) but it does sound like they have really different rules.

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