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Amy's Organic - An Indicator Of Ultra-Sensitivity?

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Hi,

I'm new here and to Celic Disease, having just received my diagnosis a week ago. And I'm having a bit of difficulty figuring out the subtleties of ultra-sensitivity versus just regular sensitivity to gluten; and which group I may fall into. Amy's Organic is a prime example.

I've found discussions here about the Amy's line, and most point to Amy's as a good gluten-free resource. But then there are those that have discovered that apparent cross-contamination makes Amy's hands-off. At least to them, through experience. I've reacted poorly to Amy's Mexican Casserole myself, hence my interest. I could not find it in the Gluten-Free Mall, which doesn't strike me as a good sign.

Somewhere along the line Amy's seems to have changed it's labeling from "gluten-free" to "no gluten ingredients". I'm not familiar with the products from years back, so I don't know if the current statement that the product is "...made in a facility that also processes foods containing wheat...", has always been on the box. But it would seem that the change is an acknowledgement of the CC potential, subsequent to the "gluten-free" days.

Does it follow that if I have a bad reaction to an Amy's dish, one that only has "trace" amounts of gluten, that I'm ultra-sensitive to gluten? Or is Amy's alone not going to be a reliable indicator?

My apologies if this is a beaten to death topic or more of a question for my GI specialist. I do see that the simplest solution is to avoid Amy's. But what if it's not Amy's and something else? Is everyone stuck using trial and error to discover his or her own unique variation of Celiac? Thank-you!

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To be honest, when first going gluten free, it's best not to purchase processed foods of any kind so that there's less of a chance of being glutened. Oftentimes, newly diagnosed celiacs run out right away to purchase gluten-free substitutes for their favorite processed foods when it is much better to buy only natural ingredients. This DOES require preparing and/or cooking your meals, but you only need to do it for six months or so before adding in processed foods. Of course, you can certainly try to eat some of the reputable gluten-free breads and pastas during this time, but the frozen and packaged gluten-free meals should be avoided until you know how sensitive you are to gluten. During this time, you'll also become aware of any other food intolerances you may have. Also, eating whole, natural foods will help you heal faster and provide you with more nutrients.

As for your specific question about Amy's, I've always had a problem with her products. I always got sick afterwards, so I've avoided eating them for the past four years. I'm sensitive to gluten, but I don't believe I'm super-sensitive. I personally try not to consume products that are labeled, "Does not contain gluten ingredients," because there's always the chance of cross-contamination. Trader Joe's uses this description a lot on their packaging.

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Also, eating whole, natural foods will help you heal faster and provide you with more nutrients.

Thank-you, Rose. I hadn't yet really picked up on the idea that healing is aided by more than just going gluten-free. I'm not one to cook very often, beyond meat in the oven with veggies and a side dish. The veggies and side are usually of the frozen food variety. My freezer had to be emptied entirely, except for meats and fish, and a few rice & vegetable bags. My pantry had to be emptied entirely, except for "meat" (Spam Singles). Almonds, peanuts, cashews...gone, as they're processed in plants with wheat CC. It's time to rebuild not only my food supply, but my body as well. Thanks for the advice.

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Let the healing begin...it sounds as though you're on the right path. And, believe me, it gets easier.

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Last I knew Amy's had "no gluten ingredients" and "gluten free" they are separate categories, one less cced than the other. I reacted to both, but I am very sensitive.

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