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Ellymay

Any Spanish/ Italian Speakers Out There?

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Hi folks

I am about to go to Spain and Italy for a month and have just found out I am pregnant! So food choices are getting even slimmer. I have made a travel card using the babel fish website and want to know that this card really is an accurate translation of the english version.

I would be really grateful if a spanish/italian speaker could check these for me and let me know if their meaning is not clear. And if anyone know of good gluten free eating places in Barcelona, Madrid, Seville and Rome, please let me know!

English version:

"I am pregnant and have coeliac disease. I cannot eat any wheat, barley, rye or oats. I cannot eat shellfish, soft cheese, salads or mayonnaise. Eggs and meat must be well cooked and hot.

Please show me what is safe for me to eat. Thank you."

Translated:

"Estoy embarazado y tengo enfermedad celiaca. No puedo comer ningún trigo, cebada, centeno o avena. No puedo comer los crust

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I speak spanish. I'm impressed by babel fish! Just a few corrections, because according to this you're a pregnant male :)

"Estoy embarazada y soy celiaca. No puedo comer trigo, cebada, centeno o avena. No puedo comer los crustáceos, el queso suave, las ensaladas o la mayonesa. Los huevos y la carne deben estar bien hechos y caliente. Por favor demuéstreme que puedo comer que sea seguro. Gracias."

I can't help with the Italian, but my guess is you need to change the first two words to "Sono incinta" otherwise you're probably also a pregnant male in Italy. laugh.gif

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For Spain: I was just in Seville for a wedding - I made it almost all the way through (got sick at the wedding itself).

If you can find your way to grocery stores, that could help you quite a bit. The bigger Corte Ingles grocery stores (that's the major dept store throughout Spain) have extensive gluten free products.

I strongly recommend that you avoid eating at the bar/tapas style places that are everywhere. You'll be much safer in real sit down restaurants (even if the cost is slightly higher). We did this once a day for the main meal (around 2:00pm). In Seville you'll have the particular challenge that fish, well everything, tends to be fried (less so in Madrid and Barcelona). Your safest bets are going to be grilled fish, steak, or rice dishes (paella!).

My breakfasts and snacks consisted of oj/hard boiled egg/fruit from the hotel, or gazpacho/fruit/serrano ham from the grocery store. We had a mini-fridge in the hotel to store a few items.

The gazpacho from the grocery store (found with the refrigerated orange juices) is safe as long as it's the traditional kind without bread (you have to check the ingredients and sometimes it's labeled gluten free). I wouldn't trust it in a restaurant no matter what they say.

The serrano ham (similar to prosciutto) is ubiquitous and should be safe as long as it's kept far from the bread that usually accompanies it. Same is true for the spanish omelette - it's just eggs, onion and potato, but make sure they don't serve it on or with bread. I'm still wondering if I actually got sick from the omelette I ate before going to the wedding. They served everyone else's on a piece of bread, and later I wondered if they just slid mine off the bread and onto the plate (although I think I got hit later that night at the wedding itself).

For dinner, that's tougher. Maybe your hotel will offer good options. Spaniards don't usually go to sit-down restaurants for dinner. It tends to be more of the bar/tapas places. Most nights I just avoided dinner, had a bar (I brought a bunch from home) or canned fish, etc. in the room. If you do go to one of those places, they usually have revueltos (that means scrambled eggs) with veggies, etc. in them - that may be your safest bet.

Hopefully you can find a good book with restaurant recommendations.

Finally, is your trip flexible at all? I personally would skip Seville (and I say this as someone whose family lives there). Andalucia (the southern region of Spain) is just tough because of how much they depend on fried food. You won't have this problem in Madrid/Barcelona. However, if there's one thing you really shouldn't miss from the southern region I would choose the Alhambra (in Granada) over Seville. Can you extend your stays in Madrid/Barcelona and use them as a base to travel around? Both of these cities are going to have your safest eating choices and there are beautiful parts of northern/central Spain (Toledo and Segovia near Madrid, for example, both make great day trips).

Good luck and hope you have a great time!

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I have not been back to Rome since my celiac diagnosis this year but Italy is incredibly aware of celiac disease; in fact, it is mandatory that everyone gets tested for it by the age of either 5 or 6. I had no problems in Italy whatsoever in May and we will be there again in a few weeks. I did find I was not able to have gelato very often but did enjoy granitas. If I were you I would go to the markets, too, for fresh fruit and veg. My biggest concerns were the flights and airports so I took along plenty of gluten-free snacks from Canada. Thank goodness I did because we had some pretty major flight delays!

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I put it out there to my native italian speaking family. Do you want to add anything in about cross-contamination?

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You can also use Google Translate. I use that when I contact our friends in Croatia. I, too, use restaurant cards I have made up and laminated...cannot recall which website but they were fairly comprehensive. They come in many languages and I will be using them in Slovenia as well as Croatia and Italy in October. (I find that I have rarely had to use them in Italy as they are so aware. However, they are handy in off-the-beaten-path rural locations which certainly is not Rome!)

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Hi everyone

Thanks for all your tips and for establishing my femininity!

I am re-thinking this at present. I do not have full blown coeliac disease but it seemed easier to state that on the card than try to explain that a tiny amount of gluten is probably ok.

I am fully expecting to get glutened on my trip and as long as it is not happening all the time I think I will cope ok. I am more concerned with the dangers of food poisoning while pregnant - which means things like cold ham, mayo and gazpacho will probably be off the menu, along with eggs if not cooked really well.

So now I am wondering if I am restricting myself too much. Maybe I should say I am gluten intolerant...but how to explain what is ok (ie fried food that might be cross contaminated) and what is not (stuff dipped in flour and fried).

Oh..and eating tapas was going to be a highlight of the trip so I fully intend on eating some of them!

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Hi everyone

Thanks for all your tips and for establishing my femininity!

I am re-thinking this at present. I do not have full blown coeliac disease but it seemed easier to state that on the card than try to explain that a tiny amount of gluten is probably ok.

I am fully expecting to get glutened on my trip and as long as it is not happening all the time I think I will cope ok. I am more concerned with the dangers of food poisoning while pregnant - which means things like cold ham, mayo and gazpacho will probably be off the menu, along with eggs if not cooked really well.

So now I am wondering if I am restricting myself too much. Maybe I should say I am gluten intolerant...but how to explain what is ok (ie fried food that might be cross contaminated) and what is not (stuff dipped in flour and fried).

Oh..and eating tapas was going to be a highlight of the trip so I fully intend on eating some of them!

Further to above, I think I will just avoid anything obviously gluteny and see how I go. If I get really sick, then I can start using the travel cards.

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I think if you are actually trying to avoid these things you do need to tell your servers, not just order carefully off the menu.

I put your english version on facebook and here is what people have said so far:

My friend asked an Italian friend of hers about it and here is what he said (she thought he was idiotic, but you are likely to encounter folks like that wherever you go)

I have no idea how to say celiac disease but I doubt that this matters

at all as most people there (as here) don't know and don't care what

it is. I also don't see how being pregnant has any bearing on her

diet. I would go with separate statements. "Sono incinta" is "I'm

pregnant". The part about celiac disease might best be expressed as

"Ho allergie molto severe al grano, orzo, segale, frutti di mare,

insalate, maionese, e formaggi molli." This is literally "I have very

severe allergies to ..." If she really wants to combine these

seemingly disparate bits of information she can go with "Sono incinta

e ho allergie molto severe al ..."

My dad, who is in Naples at the moment also thought people wouldn't get it at all. My cousin offered a straight-up translation - she is not a native speaker but grew up with native speaking relatives and is an Italian studies major:

"Sono in cinta e ho celiachia. Non posso mangiare niente fatto di grano, orzo, segale, o avena. Non mangio frutto di mare (i crostacei),il formaggio molle, l'insalata o la maionese. Tutti gli uovi e tutta la carne devono essere bencotti e caldi. "

My grandma said she would send it to me in the mail :D

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I think if you are actually trying to avoid these things you do need to tell your servers, not just order carefully off the menu.

I put your english version on facebook and here is what people have said so far:

My friend asked an Italian friend of hers about it and here is what he said (she thought he was idiotic, but you are likely to encounter folks like that wherever you go)

My dad, who is in Naples at the moment also thought people wouldn't get it at all. My cousin offered a straight-up translation - she is not a native speaker but grew up with native speaking relatives and is an Italian studies major:

My grandma said she would send it to me in the mail :D

Wow Domestic Activist! Thanks for all your work on this! I'm not surpised by the male response and it kind of confirms my fears that people won't automatically know that pregnant women need to avoid eating, let alone get the gluten thing.

I think I will limit my food choices too much if people think I am a true coeliac but I don't want to get sick from having more than tiny amounts either. How to explain that and the pregnancy requirements as simply as possible is the challenge! I agree it is not ideal to just order carefully. For one I will probably have no idea what I am ordering and it would be expensive to turn away dishes that are unsuitable!!

Maybe someone out there can recommend some eating places that at least get the gluten free thing...Meanwhile I would love any suggestions for how to communicate my needs simply on a travel card.

Thanks again

Eleanor

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Wow Domestic Activist! Thanks for all your work on this! I'm not surpised by the male response and it kind of confirms my fears that people won't automatically know that pregnant women need to avoid eating, let alone get the gluten thing.

I think I will limit my food choices too much if people think I am a true coeliac but I don't want to get sick from having more than tiny amounts either. How to explain that and the pregnancy requirements as simply as possible is the challenge! I agree it is not ideal to just order carefully. For one I will probably have no idea what I am ordering and it would be expensive to turn away dishes that are unsuitable!!

Maybe someone out there can recommend some eating places that at least get the gluten free thing...Meanwhile I would love any suggestions for how to communicate my needs simply on a travel card.

Thanks again

Eleanor

Keep in mind Italy is one of the best countries on the planet for celiac awareness. As I said before, I had absolutely no problems with celiac in Italy (other than intense pizza cravings, etc.). Although I showed my servers my restaurant cards they were so well versed that they said they did not need them (but I did request that they show the cards to the chefs). From what they said it was so obvious they knew what they were talking about. Italy is far easier than here in Canada.

This is what my restaurant card says in English,

"I have an illness called Celiac Disease and have to follow a strict gluten-free diet. I may therefore become very ill if I eat food containing flours or anything with wheat, rye, barley and oats. Does this food contain flour or whear, rye, barley or oats? If you are at all uncertain about what the food contains, please tell me. I can eat rice, maize, potatoes, cheese, milk, all kinds of vegetables and fruit, eggs, meat and fish - as long as they are not cooked with flours mentioned above, batter, breadcrumbs or sauce.

Thank you for your help."

Italian:

"Sono affetto da celiachia (intolleranza al glutine), devo fare una dieta assolutamente priva di glutine. Qualsiasi cibo contenente farina di grano, orzo, segale e avena puo causarmi gravi malori. Mi puo dire se questo cibo contiene farina di grano, segale, orzo o avena?

Se non e sicuro degli ingredienti di questo cibo, la prego di dirmelo. Posso mangiare cibi contenti riso, granturco, patate, qualsiasi verdura e frutta, uova, carne e pesce, purche non siano stati preparati con aggiunta di farina, pane grattugiato o salsa legata con farina o pastella fatta con farina. Grazie per il suo aiuto."

Now that I have eliminated dairy I must change my cards to reflect that.

If you do a search there are many places in Rome that will happily accommodate. :) We will be in Italy, Croatia, Slovenia and Slovakia in three weeks and I have no fears re celiac stuff whatsoever. :D

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Keep in mind Italy is one of the best countries on the planet for celiac awareness. As I said before, I had absolutely no problems with celiac in Italy (other than intense pizza cravings, etc.). Although I showed my servers my restaurant cards they were so well versed that they said they did not need them (but I did request that they show the cards to the chefs). From what they said it was so obvious they knew what they were talking about. Italy is far easier than here in Canada.

This is what my restaurant card says in English,

"I have an illness called Celiac Disease and have to follow a strict gluten-free diet. I may therefore become very ill if I eat food containing flours or anything with wheat, rye, barley and oats. Does this food contain flour or whear, rye, barley or oats? If you are at all uncertain about what the food contains, please tell me. I can eat rice, maize, potatoes, cheese, milk, all kinds of vegetables and fruit, eggs, meat and fish - as long as they are not cooked with flours mentioned above, batter, breadcrumbs or sauce.

Thank you for your help."

Italian:

"Sono affetto da celiachia (intolleranza al glutine), devo fare una dieta assolutamente priva di glutine. Qualsiasi cibo contenente farina di grano, orzo, segale e avena puo causarmi gravi malori. Mi puo dire se questo cibo contiene farina di grano, segale, orzo o avena?

Se non e sicuro degli ingredienti di questo cibo, la prego di dirmelo. Posso mangiare cibi contenti riso, granturco, patate, qualsiasi verdura e frutta, uova, carne e pesce, purche non siano stati preparati con aggiunta di farina, pane grattugiato o salsa legata con farina o pastella fatta con farina. Grazie per il suo aiuto."

Now that I have eliminated dairy I must change my cards to reflect that.

If you do a search there are many places in Rome that will happily accommodate. :) We will be in Italy, Croatia, Slovenia and Slovakia in three weeks and I have no fears re celiac stuff whatsoever. :D

THanks Love2travel. Any experience of Spain? I will be 3 weeks in Spain and 1 in Rome.

I have found the following blog which is helpful:

http://www.glutenfreeguidebook.com/tag/madrid/

The same author has done one for Barcelona, from which I found this guide to eating gluten free in Barcelona :)

http://www.celiacscatalunya.org/pdfs/guia_ajuntament_bcn.pdf

So I am getting the impression that in the main centres at least there is good gluten free awareness.

I am MOST worried about getting food poisoning while pregnant (e.g from aoili made from raw egg)and the combined coeliac and pregnancy diet is limiting which is why I thought I should change the card to say a little gluten is ok.

But maybe that will just complicate things further and is unnecessary!!

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THanks Love2travel. Any experience of Spain? I will be 3 weeks in Spain and 1 in Rome.

I have found the following blog which is helpful:

http://www.glutenfreeguidebook.com/tag/madrid/

The same author has done one for Barcelona, from which I found this guide to eating gluten free in Barcelona :)

http://www.celiacscatalunya.org/pdfs/guia_ajuntament_bcn.pdf

So I am getting the impression that in the main centres at least there is good gluten free awareness.

I am MOST worried about getting food poisoning while pregnant (e.g from aoili made from raw egg)and the combined coeliac and pregnancy diet is limiting which is why I thought I should change the card to say a little gluten is ok.

But maybe that will just complicate things further and is unnecessary!!

I have not yet been to Spain (want to, though) so I am afraid I cannot help you there. But I have been to lots of European countries and so many seem to have increasing awareness.

I totally get that you are concerned about food poisoning, etc. while pregnant. I do not think it would hurt to add info about pregnancy (your example, raw fish, etc.). I would not change your card to include small amounts of gluten because that could mean different things to different people. Not only that if you say you have celiac in Italy but say you can have small amounts of gluten you might get some interesting reactions. I think you should leave it as no gluten. :) Plus you do not want to chance getting sick from even tiny amounts whilst on vacation - many people grow more sensitive to minute amounts over time.

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I don't understand why you would carry a food card and say tiny bits of gluten are ok. It just confuses the issue, and may end up getting you sick.

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Here is what my grandma sent:

Sono encinte con una malatia che si chiama celac disease.........Non posso mangiare grano, gamberi o altro pesce di mare come gamberi (cozze etc), ,orzo, insalada, formaggi morbidi (mozzarella etc). E necessario che le uova e la carne viene ben cotto e caldo....niente maionese

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Hi folks

I am about to go to Spain and Italy for a month and have just found out I am pregnant! So food choices are getting even slimmer. I have made a travel card using the babel fish website and want to know that this card really is an accurate translation of the english version.

I would be really grateful if a spanish/italian speaker could check these for me and let me know if their meaning is not clear. And if anyone know of good gluten free eating places in Barcelona, Madrid, Seville and Rome, please let me know!

English version:

"I am pregnant and have coeliac disease. I cannot eat any wheat, barley, rye or oats. I cannot eat shellfish, soft cheese, salads or mayonnaise. Eggs and meat must be well cooked and hot.

Please show me what is safe for me to eat. Thank you."

Translated:

Sono incinta e sono allergica al glutine. Non posso mangiare frumento, orzo, segale e avena e percio' farina e pangrattato. Non posso mangiare crostacei, formaggi a pasta molle, insalata o maionese. Le uova e la carne deve essere ben cotta.

"Estoy embarazado y tengo enfermedad celiaca. No puedo comer ningún trigo, cebada, centeno o avena. No puedo comer los crust

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ciao,

My name is Veronica.I made the translations for you, but in Italy you can have almost any cheese and also salads. It is not our habit to put bread in the salads. What it is very comon in italy is to eat prosciutto crudo, like parma o san daniel. If you are pregnant you shouldn't ieat it , even if it is gluten-free, because is rare.

Should you have any questions write me

Ciao veronica

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It's really nice of you to translate the text for people!

ken

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