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swittenauer

Anger

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Can anyone tell me if it is common to people with Celiac to have major mood swings & sudden outbursts of anger and to get very irritated for no apparent reason. My husband is the sweetest man alive but sometimes since he started to get sick & lose weight through now he has - out of the blue - mood swings, sudden anger & gets very irritable. I'm just trying to see if it might be something else that is wrong or if these symptoms are associated with having Celiac.

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Can anyone tell me if it is common to people with Celiac to have major mood swings & sudden outbursts of anger and to get very irritated for no apparent reason.  My husband is the sweetest man alive but sometimes since he started to get sick & lose weight through now he has - out of the blue - mood swings, sudden anger & gets very irritable.  I'm just trying to see if it might be something else that is wrong or if these symptoms are associated with having Celiac.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Definitely is a part of celiac. My husband accidently fed me wheat one night and the next morning I felt that old familiar rage inside. Fortunately for him I recognized it and was able to suppress it until I got to work. The longer your husband goes gluten-free, the more he'll be able to see what is celiac related.

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This is absolutely me! When I get any gluten I go into rages/tears/depression/being nuts. I will go off my nut. I didn't even realize how weird this was until I stopped doing it, now it starts and I forget at first that it's weird, then realize I must have been glutened or whatever (I have a few food problems) and then I do my best to keep it under wraps. Sometimes that means I have to tell my husband I really really need to be alone, or that I really can't talk, etc. It's hard but once you get a handle on that it gets better. Refined sugars, alcohol, nightshades also do this to me.

It will get better! :)

Stephanie

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I would say there may be some sort of physiological cause, and just a plain emotional one. There can be a tremendous about of stress around this and chronic illnesses are often a cataylst for anger, depression, anxiety etc. Maybe he just needs to be open with you, or maybe at some point he might need to process this all with a counselor ? What helps me emotionally is to simplify as much as I can so I do not have an additional stress at home.

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One of the biggest reasons I pushed to try to find out what was wrong with me was I was turning into a b@%ch. I'm a very easy-going, hard to ruffle person and over the past six months I was snappy and grouchy and sad and ANGRY!

I'm starting to feel like myself again, but there is lingering sadness and a little bit of grouchyness, some caused by just dealing with this.

The worst thing is, while you're doing it you know its not you. You KNOW something else is making you feel this way. ARRGGG.

Hope it gets better.

Elonwy

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I just wanted to point out I was actually diagnosed as bipolar and on Social Security at the glorious age of 24 - now I'm 34 and since being off gluten, I have been the nicest and mellowest I've ever been. I have one of the neurological gluten genes - I think that has a lot to do with my changes. I'm pretty sure my dad has the same problems, but he won't get tested...

Steph

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Stephanie-

Wow--what a story. It's amazing how 'misdiagnosed' we can be !

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The same thing happened to me; the crazy thing is how nuts a thing like wheat bread can make you!!

Now that I am gluten-free, I am more stable than ever except when I get glutened. Last week the ever so helpful clerk at the healthfood store assured me some liquid vitamins were safe....hmm read barely leaves in the ingeredients two days later. Shame on me for believing the clerk. Anyway, I was in the grocery store a couple days ago (right after getting glutened by these vitamins), and a lady made a snide remark that I was thin enough, I didn't need to be reading labels. It took all my control not to jump over my cart and lunge at her. Normally, I am calm, quiet and mild mannered. Needless to say, I had a good laugh at myself for being so out of character because of a dumb little grain. I think what the others have said is very true, gluten can make you nuts, but after a while you learn that the gluten is the root of the problem and can control it a little better.

By the way, kudos to you for being involved and concerned for your husband. It takes a lot of fortitude. My BF was a total jerk when he quit smoking, when I quit gluten he laughed because the tables were turned. :lol:

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Steph,

What do you mean by "I have one of the neurological gluten genes"? Do you have peripheral neuropathies? Could you explain the genetics?

I am definately gluten sensitive and have been gluten-free for about a yr...but I guess that doesn't count much since I am still figuring out the hidden sources of gluten getting into my system...and other food allergies. For ex. I just switched the hair care products I use and double checked all other personal care stuff. A yr ago I though it was a simple matter of reading food labels and using common sense, but as you all know, the presence of the grains in so many products makes only one kind of sense, as in lots of cents for the big Agro and junk food companies.

I won't get into detail on this thread, but I have some neurological symptoms I thought were all caused by a neck and low back injury I sustained five yrs ago...now I am not so sure and am thinking maybe the undeniable trauma brought more celiac symptoms to the surface. I say more because I have always been nauseous, always, and worst in the morning waking up with an empty stomach. So the docs labeled me with hypoglycemia and told me to eat "whole grains instead of Wonder bread". Seems the nausea and hypoglycemia were the early symptoms, as far back as I can remember, and now in my late thirties, everything is so much worse.

If I had health insurance I would definately be getting some blood work done... So I am flying blind here; could have all kinds of nutrient deficiencies, could have flat villi, and I would like to get the genotyping done. For now, eating properly is the only thing I can afford, and just!

Now to get back on topic, my husband tells me I have some irritability issues that I need to work out since it's not fair to him. We have been together since high school. I definitely am impatient and defensive but seems to me he is the one to start these episodes! He tells me part of it is the tone of voice I use at times and I tell him I simply react to his tone. And I think he uses my health issues as the "reason" for every quarrel we have, couldn't be him after all. He doesn't understand the need I have at times to just be left alone. How many of you out there need time alone?

Judi

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Hi Judi -

I got tested through EnteroLab and found out I don't have either of the two widely accepted Celiac genes but I do have two genes that have been connected to gluten intolerance - one is DQ1, 6 (or DQ6) and the other is DQ3, 9 (or DQ9). The DQ1 gene has been connected in studies with gluten intolerance other than Celiac, including microscopic colitis and neurological manifestations of gluten intolerance, including gluten ataxia. There is some thought that this gene is linked to emotional disorders, like bipolar and depression when gluten is introduced. Peripheral neurapathy is one manifestation of gluten intolerance, that can also occur with B12 deficiency.

I found out that DQ3, 9 is only one amino acid different from DQ3, 8 which is one of the two Celiac genes. In a study Dr. Fine of EnteroLab sent to me, it appears that this can manifest in Celiac symptoms that are about 10% that of DQ3, 8. I think the fact I have two genes linked though compound it for me - I get terrible IBS symptoms as well as neurological and mood problems. But I don't think it's very likely I'd have visible damage in a biopsy, were I still eating gluten.

If you've been gene tested, this stuff will make more sense to you. When I first got my results, because I didn't have one of the two main genes, I thought I was out of the woods. But I'm definitely not and have been able to find info that explains that now. It's pretty fascinating! Hope this helps...

Stephanie

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Can anyone tell me if it is common to people with Celiac to have major mood swings & sudden outbursts of anger and to get very irritated for no apparent reason.  My husband is the sweetest man alive but sometimes since he started to get sick & lose weight through now he has - out of the blue - mood swings, sudden anger & gets very irritable.  I'm just trying to see if it might be something else that is wrong or if these symptoms are associated with having Celiac.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

My father was diagnosed with celiac about 12 years ago. I was never diagnosed, but after noticing similar symptoms in me, my father recommended I go gluten-free for 30 days. It was incredibly hard, but I did it. That was about 6 years ago. And felt better than I had in years. One of the first things to go was my mood swings. I would get angry at the drop of a hat or cry over the silliest things. I can tell now when I've been glutened - I am miserably sad and quick-tempered! It usually lasts a couple days and as I recover it gets better. For me, drinking TONS of water and doubling up on Vitamin C really seem to help.

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I am very angry, impatient, and irritable. I've always had ataxia, and now I have muscle weakness and bone pain, so this doesn't help (when I am trying to get something to do what I want it to, including my own body). My family used to call me their "bundle of delight" when I was a child, but obviously the name no longer applies. I am gluten-free, so maybe I have hormonal or nutritional deficiencies or other food allergies that still need to be addressed.

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Thanks Stephanie,

It certainly must help knowing one's genotype and knowing the genotype is correlated with disease. All the questions and worry along the lines of "what's wrong with me?!" can be put aside. Knowing with certainty solves so many problems.

I am very interested in the genetics and will contact EnteroLabs for some information. Do you have any references to the scientidfic literature that I might be able to get online?

It is a relief to hear from people like you, Stephanie, who have managed their condition well and are back to enjoying life! Thanks for sharing your experiences.

Judi

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well

in a way yes

depression is one of the symtoms of celiac

Symptoms of celiac disease may include one or more of the following:

* Recurring abdominal bloating and pain

* Chronic diarrhea

* Weight loss

* Pale, foul-smelling stool

* Unexplained anemia (low count of red blood cells)

* Gas

* Bone pain

* Muscle cramps

* Fatigue

* Delayed growth

* Failure to thrive in infants

* Pain in the joints

* Seizures

* Tingling numbness in the legs (from nerve damage)

* Pale sores inside the mouth, called aphthus ulcers

* Painful skin rash, called dermatitis herpetiformis

* Tooth discoloration or loss of enamel

* Missed menstrual periods (often because of excessive weight loss)

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Hi,

I must say that I can appreciate your concerns about anger and sensitivity, since that seems to be a recurring theme when we get "glutened". I have had Celiac symptoms since age 8 but no one knew what was wrong. After spending my money on doctors with no helpful results, I went on elimination diets to find out which foods were bothering me.

Now, at age 60, I have been told I have Celiac, I have been on a special diet for many years, and even now I am still discovering different and better ways to remain gluten free, milk and dairy free, and egg white and yeast free.

So many foods have traces of wheat or dairy in them, and some which are gluten free are processed in plants where wheat or dairy is also processed, possibly causing cross-contamination.

Somedays I want to say to those around me, "Have you ever thought what it is like to try to stick to my diet?" If even one person ever attempted to eat the foods I eat, I would be so surprised, and I'm sure they would be surprised too.

It takes hours and hours to shop for and prepare tasty, healthful foods at home, but I am now more accustomed to doing just that, and really don't look forward to going to restaurants anymore. However, in the past when I lived with a spouse or children, it was much harder than being alone. Time alone is so important, just to be able to process all that we go through with this disease.

Time seems to take care of a lot of things, and with time comes increased confidence in our abilities to take good care of ourselves. Also, with more and more people being diagnosed (1 our of 133 Americans is said to have Celiac) we will be blessed with more and more prepared foods that we can eat. Welda Lou

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Most of my gluten symptoms are in the brain, I think. I've never noticed any serious bowel issues, but holy cow, I sure have been crazy! My moods are terrible, also diagnosed bipolar, and sometimes, dare I admit, even a bit psychotic. There are many studies showing the efficacy of gluten free and gluten free/casein free on schizophrenia and some historians theorize that one of the possibilities behind the hysterical girls who launched the Salem Witch Trials was a grain allergy. Funny, huh!

I started taking a special vitamin supplement for mental health and I can feel it changing me day by day. I think there are severe nutritional deficiencies in me impacting my mood, but also, I have autoimmune thyroiditis as well, so I know that an autoimmune process has been launched in me, perhaps by the gluten. I am attacking my thyroid, so perhaps I am attacking my brain as well! Hopefully, removing the gluten (and casein, I'm also doing that) will slow or reverse the autoimmune process.

Food for thought!

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I hardly have any GI symptoms other than malabsorption. My most noticable symptoms are depression/irritability/anger/mood swings. My whole life I never experienced anything like this...it only started when I began having problems with food. Took me 3 years to figure out it was gluten. I still cant quite comprehend how this tiny protein can cause such dramatic changes to a persons personality.

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Well, I'm not glad to know that lots of people have the same problems but I am glad to know that it is "normal" for celiacs. He does so much better when he is totally away from gluten. I guess you can't help but slip up here & there. The past few days he has been doing really well as far as the anger goes but instead he is achy all the time. I guess it has to be one thing or the other until you get a hold of the disease. He is meeting with a nutritionist next week so hopefully that will help him a little more.

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Man, I've been a wreck lately. I have a little bit of GI issues, but mostly I have lingering sadness, depression here and there, spaciness, and anxiety when facing tasks. Needless to say, it's hard to get things done. This seems to come and go. I think I'm gluten free, but I'm sure not acting like it.

Stephanie--after reading your post, I'm going to try totally eliminating casein and see if that makes any difference.

Crazy Rachel

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Well, he met with the nutritionist but I think since we have done so much research ourselves, we didn't really learn much new information. However, the anger is totally not an issue now. He has been doing very well with his eating gluten free & only an occasional slip up but I guess it is all a learning process.

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My experience is opposite: after I went OFF gluten I got depressed, angry, and mood swings. My personal theory is that we already know carbs affect our level of serotonin in the brain; therefore when you quit eating wheat/gluten you are eliminating a lot of natural "mood enhancers." now, I still eat carbs, but not nearly as much as before. So, my theory is that the loss of carbs had to be it. After all, I had not suffered from depression or anger before going gluten-free. I am now taking meds and feel much better.

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So does anyone have a hard time knowing that you are getting angry because you have been gluttened. For the most part, my husband seems to be able to control it but last night, after having slipped up & testing our daughters gluten filled soup, he totally lost it. He got very frustrated & down right angry. He seemed to realize why midstream but it didn't really help at all knowing why he was acting that way. He was all better after a good nights sleep but boy did he just really lose it for a few hours.

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So does anyone have a hard time knowing that you are getting angry because you have been gluttened.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah I do. In the back of my mind I know its got to do with gluten and of course people will tell me to realize its just a reaction. Not so easy for me to control though....I don't rationalize at the moment I'm feeling it. I can't just stop and laugh at myself...to me the feelings whether its anger, frusteration or depression are very real at the time and I only calm down after a good nap.

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I have gotten a lot better about figuring out it's because of gluten, like initially I might not know, but then some lightbulb goes off, but by then it's like I've got a firehose all to myself and it just shoots water (or molten lava or fire) any direction it wants, I just happen to be along for the ride. I know at that point, the best thing for me to do is try to be put down for sleep - I tell my husband "I can't talk about this now..." or whatever I need to and then I retreat. If I have ativan or something like that, that's a good time for me to take it. Whatever I can do to shut the process down.

It's weird being aware of it. My husband is very philosophical - says he doesn't like the way it feels to be angry, so he doesn't get angry. Well, I don't like how it feels either, but it is something that is beyond my control. It's like skiing, when you're not very good at it, and you realize you are going too fast down the slope, you make yourself wreck so you'll stop before you hurt yourself or anyone else. That is my current strategy.

I'm sorry you and your husband have to go through this. It's not fun. Hang in there, if you can, this anger is not real. :)

Stephanie

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