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MerrillC1977

Perfect Gluten-Free White/sandwich Bread

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I have really enjoyed reading this thread as well as the one about Challah by Simona. Out of respect for all those who have gone before in the bread baking saga of gluten free baking I wanted to post this link.

http://www.celiac.co...ing-udis-bread/

I think your recipe must belong at the end of this thread in light of the reviews it is getting. The Challah by Simona rates up there too from the reviews I've read.

I've never baked a loaf of gluten free bread. It wasn't worth it to me after reading the reverse engineering thread when I first got on here a year ago. I was exhausted and frustrated by the prospect of bread. :blink: But the pictures of your loaf and Simona's are very enticing. I think there might be some bread baking in this house this winter! :o;)

Thank you both.

Thank you for all the compliments everyone. I am also reading and studying very carefully my new eBook cookbooks, and I am learning a TON about the different flours, their tastes, how they affect the baking of certain/particular items, etc.....and will be experimenting with other recipes soon. I will be sure to post any/all successes. :)

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someone a few posts back asked about subbing flax meal in the recipe and should/could the number of eggs be reduced.

You can make a "flax egg" with 1 tbsp of flax meal and 3 tbsp of hot water, leave to soak about 5 to 10 minutes. You can also use the same amounts for a "chia egg" with chia seeds. Both of those mixtures will replace 1 egg in a recipe, if you have any egg free, or vegan bread eaters. Thought I'm not sure how this would work in the bread recipe as to size of the loaf, or if it will affect the rise.

http://www.veganbaking.net/vegan-recipes/eggless-binders/chia-seed-binder.html

Adding flax and/or chia will increase the fiber to the bread, thereby decreasing the carb load, and it will also increase the Omega 3s :) The soluble fiber in chia seeds helps slow down the conversion of carbohydrates to sugar and thus, help stabilize blood sugar levels.

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someone a few posts back asked about subbing flax meal in the recipe and should/could the number of eggs be reduced.

You can make a "flax egg" with 1 tbsp of flax meal and 3 tbsp of hot water, leave to soak about 5 to 10 minutes. You can also use the same amounts for a "chia egg" with chia seeds. Both of those mixtures will replace 1 egg in a recipe, if you have any egg free, or vegan bread eaters. Thought I'm not sure how this would work in the bread recipe as to size of the loaf, or if it will affect the rise.

http://www.veganbaking.net/vegan-recipes/eggless-binders/chia-

seed-binder.html

Thanks - I've been throwing flax meal in after all the other ingredients and it has been fine, but I need to get a little more deliberate about it. Does letting it sit with the water a bit do something different to it or is it ok to just throw some in there? Wondering if you get the same nutrient value.

Adding flax and/or chia will increase the fiber to the bread, thereby decreasing the carb load, and it will also increase the Omega 3s :) The soluble fiber in chia seeds helps slow down the conversion of carbohydrates to sugar and thus, help stabilize blood sugar levels.

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From experimenting, I have discovered that chia soaking to make a "chia gel egg" actually works better with cold water than with hot. And the longer it soaks, the more it thickens. It may take more than the equal amount of water, because it absorbs it and swells up. It can replace the gum when making mini loaves of bread, if you use certain gluten free flours which tend to be less crumble prone anyway, such as almond, amaranth, flax, buckwheat, garbanzo bean. You can also put the dry chia seed in with the flours if you are going to pre soak the flours in water or raise the moist dough/batter with yeast, but some things tend to make the gel un- gel itself, and become thinner, such as mixing baking soda or vinegar directly into it - not sure if it has the same effect from diluting it in the entire recipe.

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mixing the flax or chia with water prior to adding to the dough will make either act as a substitute for eggs (for vegan or egg intolerant foodies). Both of these seeds will become gummy, with the consistency of an egg, when you let sit for a while in water. No, neither will lose their nutritional value when you do this.

I made this bread last Friday, but modified it quite liberally for my own nutritional tastes. The original recipe, though I'm sure is tasty, has no nutritional value, and is way too high in carbohydrate for my liking, so I used it as a guideline, and added a few things.

Instead of 2 1/2 cups of all purpose flour, I reduced that to 1 3/4 cups, and added 1 full cup of ground flax meal and 1 tbsp of dry chia seeds. This adds nearly 4g of fiber to each slice of bread, (where previously there were none) as well as a very nice nutty flavour to the finished product, for more of an artisanal type bread.

I also replaced one of the 3 eggs with a "chia egg" mixture, and used lemon juice instead of apple cider vinegar, and coconut sugar instead of white sugar. Coconut sugar is much lower net carbohydrates per serving than white sugar.

This bread was awesome warm out of the oven with some butter on it, and amazingly, still wonderful 4 days later and I served it yesterday at Thanksgiving dinner, where there were 3 friends who are also recently gluten-free, one of whom is a 17 y/o boy, who immediately asked me for the recipe so he could make it at home himself! My non-gluten-free family also quite liked it, but they're not big on "health food" <_<

I think it would also be nice with some added caraway seeds, for a "rye" bread sort of taste.

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The original recipe, though I'm sure is tasty, has no nutritional value, and is way too high in carbohydrate for my liking, so I used it as a guideline, and added a few things.

I agree that nutritionally this bread needs some work. I am currently experimenting with multigrain recipes and will post when I come up with a good one. :)

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I'm thinking of trying it with gluten free oat flour next, for even lower net carb count. I've made a few dessert loaves with oat flour, and I've tolerated it well, and I ordered a grain mill so that I can buy whole gluten free oats, and grind them myself. It'll cost about half as much that way, and I can also use the mill to grind nut flours, and bean flours.

Please do post the multi-grain recipe when you get it perfected. I love crunchy bread :) This recipe works great as a base for it.

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I'm thinking of trying it with gluten free oat flour next, for even lower net carb count. I've made a few dessert loaves with oat flour, and I've tolerated it well, and I ordered a grain mill so that I can buy whole gluten free oats, and grind them myself. It'll cost about half as much that way, and I can also use the mill to grind nut flours, and bean flours.

Please do post the multi-grain recipe when you get it perfected. I love crunchy bread :) This recipe works great as a base for it.

I would love to incorporate oat flour into a recipe. I love oats. I will definitely try it. I once made protein muffins using oat flour that I ground up myself from whole oats(and no wheat flour at all) and they came out really well. Come to think of it, I didn't use (or even have) Xanthan Gum at that point, and they came out well -- no crumblies.

I am working on the multigrain recipe, and what I am finding is that there are soooo many gluten-free flours to choose from, it's hard to choose which to use (I want to use them all to make the bread as nutritious and flavorful as possible!). :)

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I have made this recipe 3 times now. All three times the bread taste great, the texture is good but the bread has never baked as high as your picture. It will rise in the pan to 1/2 below top of pan then I bake at 375 for 50-55

minutes. When it bakes it does not rise at all then It seems to settle but not sink as it cools, therefore making it heavier than yours. I did sub 1/8 cup flax meal for the flour mix to give it some fiber/protein. Can this be making it not

bake as high? I am using a standard Teflon bread pan and the oil I use is vegetable. Any idea's everyone? Should I let it rise more ? use Guar gum instead of Xanthum gum? I really want to keep the flax meal in it but am not sure

how to make it taller.

I love this bread and we make small sandwiches, french toast etc. with it so I will keep making it but baking/experimenting is time and money if anyone knows why this is happening let me know and I will adjust the recipe .

Thnaks all, and thanks for the recipe.

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I have made this recipe 3 times now. All three times the bread taste great, the texture is good but the bread has never baked as high as your picture. It will rise in the pan to 1/2 below top of pan then I bake at 375 for 50-55

minutes. When it bakes it does not rise at all then It seems to settle but not sink as it cools, therefore making it heavier than yours. I did sub 1/8 cup flax meal for the flour mix to give it some fiber/protein. Can this be making it not

bake as high? I am using a standard Teflon bread pan and the oil I use is vegetable. Any idea's everyone? Should I let it rise more ? use Guar gum instead of Xanthum gum? I really want to keep the flax meal in it but am not sure

how to make it taller.

I love this bread and we make small sandwiches, french toast etc. with it so I will keep making it but baking/experimenting is time and money if anyone knows why this is happening let me know and I will adjust the recipe .

Thnaks all, and thanks for the recipe.

I'm having the same problem. The batter/dough was really *gloppy*, more so than any other recipe I've tried. I didn't add flaxseed meal although I do like it. Followed the recipe exactly using KA flour, which I'm now out of. I baked it in a 9x4x4" pan (from King Arthur).

So I am also puzzled as to how some people can get it to rise so nicely.

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I'm having the same problem. The batter/dough was really *gloppy*, more so than any other recipe I've tried. I didn't add flaxseed meal although I do like it. Followed the recipe exactly using KA flour, which I'm now out of. I baked it in a 9x4x4" pan (from King Arthur).

So I am also puzzled as to how some people can get it to rise so nicely.

Maybe it's an altitude thing? I know on some regular cake mixes for example, they have you adjust certain ingredients if you are above/below a certain altitude. Maybe that's why you are getting different results that I do? I am in Boston, where are you?

Unfortunately, I don't know the answer to the question, so I am just speculating. I'm sorry I can't be of more help. :(

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I have made this recipe 3 times now. All three times the bread taste great, the texture is good but the bread has never baked as high as your picture. It will rise in the pan to 1/2 below top of pan then I bake at 375 for 50-55 minutes.

I let mine rise until it's about an inch ABOVE the top of the pan. Maybe try that? I am not sure why your results are not good. Maybe, as I mentioned above, it's an issue of altitude.

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Maybe it's an altitude thing? I know on some regular cake mixes for example, they have you adjust certain ingredients if you are above/below a certain altitude. Maybe that's why you are getting different results that I do? I am in Boston, where are you?

Unfortunately, I don't know the answer to the question, so I am just speculating. I'm sorry I can't be of more help. :(

I'm in south central Pennsylvania so no altitude problems here. I'm really puzzled as to why the recipe did not work for me especially after seeing others results.

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I let mine rise until it's about an inch ABOVE the top of the pan. Maybe try that? I am not sure why your results are not good. Maybe, as I mentioned above, it's an issue of altitude.

I am in Mass. also so altitude isn't it. I let it rise to just below the pan line as I thought it would cook higher so maybe letting it rise more is it.

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Merrilic...this has nothing to do with bread...but I just have to say something about your avitar!!! Just love it! In our house we refer to this behavior as "Jelly Spine"!

this usreally happens when my hubby tries to make the cat sit up and do silly things or talk to him ...or when you try to remove said cat from place where cat should not be! Passive resistance...love it!!!

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I'm wondering if temperature might anything to do with how the bread rises? The day I made it I had soup simmering on the stove. I placed the loaf of bread dough near to it on the counter. The warm temp may have made mine rise better?

Also..I know from past experiences with baking cookies, sometimes I had adjust the amount of flour so they turned out right at times. Could humidity enter into the rising issue?

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Merrilic...this has nothing to do with bread...but I just have to say something about your avitar!!! Just love it! In our house we refer to this behavior as "Jelly Spine"!

this usreally happens when my hubby tries to make the cat sit up and do silly things or talk to him ...or when you try to remove said cat from place where cat should not be! Passive resistance...love it!!!

Lol. We have 2 cats in our house. So, we feel your "pain." :)

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I'm in south central Pennsylvania so no altitude problems here. I'm really puzzled as to why the recipe did not work for me especially after seeing others results.

Sylvia,.....I tried it as well and had the same problem as you did.

Hope you remember me from other threads!

No altitude issues in Florida for sure. B)

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Sylvia,.....I tried it as well and had the same problem as you did.

Hope you remember me from other threads!

No altitude issues in Florida for sure. B)

I sure do remember you, Marc. I hope you're putting that new KA mixer to good use!!!

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I finally bought some potato starch (neighbor didn't have any either), and made a flop of a loaf :lol: But at least I figured out why it flopped and what to try next time.

Number 1, I did a quick rise in a warm turned off oven, until it was above the top of the pan. Then I took it out of the oven while I brought oven up to baking temp. In the meantime, the warm dough continued to rise :o and I am sure over-rose. I also thought that the mixture looked a little too moist (don't know if it had to do with humidity). Anyway, it looked beautiful when I took it out of the oven but then began its slow sink (compounded when I cut into it before it was totally cool -- I know, you warned me.

So loaf number two: used about an ounce less of water, did a slow rise (in the microwave away from draughts) until the crown was about 1/2 inch above top of pan, and had oven temp ready to go. It rose about an inch to inch and a half during baking, was evenly golden on outside. I checked it with a skewer and it was still a bit moist inside, so I took it out of pan and put it back in oven for seven minutes, then when I took it out I cooled it on its side (I was determined that top was not going to sink :lol:). Well, the top didn't sink but the bottom!! did curve upwards a little in the middle :blink: but it was still a great loaf, and I took it with me to an invite lunch yesterday and everyone was suitably impressed. By the way, with a little less water in it the batter did look better, more doughy, less sloppy, more gloppy, less pourable.

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Here is my report.

I made this bread maybe 4 times. Because I didn't want to pay $10.00 for little box of Kings Arthur gluten free flour, I mixed some flours and made my own bread.

http://www.celiac.co...sandwich-bread/

I have been baking it every 2-3 days.

In meantime I made a different bread- "multigrain" which is I think better because of higher amounts of fiber.

But back to this bread.

By baking so many breads I found this:

1. You need to use only regular yeast. The rapid yeast would make your bread to rise faster, but the final results wouldn't be so good- bread wouldn't be very high and it will sink 5 minutes after you will take it out from oven.

2. I'm also using extra large eggs in the recipe. I will mix them with mixer for about 5 minutes with oil and apple cider.

3. I will mix the dough with the stand mixer for at least 5 minutes on level 5-6 (medium high).

4. I will put dough into a bread pan and leave outside in the kitchen to rise for l hour. If the kitchen is to cold, I will put the unbaked bread on top of burner of my stove/oven for the last 10 minutes when the oven is heating up to 375F. It will help to pull the dough higher.

5. The bread must reach the top of the bread pan and only then I will put it into oven.

6. I will bake it always for 1 hour. When you will take it out, do not stick a knife in the bread. Use tooth pick, if you need to check. Don't cut the warm bread neither. It will sink right down. Do not open your oven to check the bread. Do not take the bread out of the oven and put it back in. The bread will sink right away. You can check on bread maybe 55 minutes later, but my experience is that it's perfectly done after 1 hour.

This bread will sink up to a half of inch when done.

7. Don't put the warm bread into a plastic bag. The steam will make it to sink much more and the bread will get moldy very fast, or turn sour. I will leave it out for 3-4 hours before I will put it in a plastic bag.

If you think that something will happen to it, it will not.

This bread is good for 3-4 days kept only in a plastic bag. You don't have to put it into fridge, if you will use it in that time. I never did. It's gone by that time.

8. One time I tried to bake two loafs at once. One loaf I made 20 minutes later. I didn't knew how to even them up. I set the oven on 350F, but shut it off after 2 minutes. It created a very nice and warm place for the dough to rise faster. I didn't close the oven completely. After about 10 minutes I took it out and heated up oven to 375F and baked for 1 hour.

9. Or I was cooking dinner and placed my bread dough into microwave which is on top of oven. The steam from dinner made it warm. The dough was up much faster. The room temperature is very important for rising.

10.One time I was busy and I didn't put my bread to oven after 1 hour. It was 1 hour and 20 minutes. Hmm. The dough was 1 inch over the top of a bread pan. The bread came out very small. The inside of the bread wasn't so airy neither and the consistance of the bread remained me of Udi's bread.

I hope that these points will help you to bake better bread.

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