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thleensd

Need Brands Of gluten-free Flours

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Hey my sensitive people!

I've gone totally grain-free and am liking the results so far. I know a few of you have problems with Bob's Red Mill products, so maybe you can help me.

I have sensitivity to corn for sure, but no idea if corn CC affects me. I am avoiding Bob's for the time being - possible issues with oat CC or...? Uncertain.

At the moment I'm grinding my own almonds, but can't quite get them fine enough for some projects. I've tried various combinations of blending/food processing/roasting/freezing.

Can any of you recommend good brands for non-grain flours? I'm particularly interested in almond and coconut flours for the moment, but hope to find other nut flours, legume flours, and other grain-free alternatives (seed? veggie?)

Thanks!

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I order my flour from nutsonline.com. I buy the almond flour from them and love it in Elana's Pantry recipes. I also bought the coconut flour but have not tried it yet, they have on their site what they test to and precautions that they take.

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I get nuts from nutsonline and like them a lot =) ...I worry because of the other things they might grind (Like I said, I don't know how sensitive I am to things like corn CC. My corn issues came on at the same time as my celiac issues. Weird.) Maybe I can call them and ask what else they process with the same equipment. Thanks.

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I've used both Tropical Traditions and Nutsonline for coconut flour. Nutsonline I've used their Almond flour but want to try the Cashew flour and Hazelnut. I'm sure they would be helpful if you call. Their customer service has been excellent for me.

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Does anyone with a Vita Mix grind their own flours? I will be receiving mine shortly and plan to make my own nut butters and various flours. I really, really want to get my hands on some chestnut flour, too.

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I would work on the grinding it myself if I were you. I sort, wash and then grind. I can understand the texture problems. I finally invested in a good grinder. I think that it is too hard to find clean starting materials, one source of cc and then too hard to make flour without adding more cc in a facility. There are shared facility issues, and cleaning supply issues, and worker sloppiness issues. Then when you have more than one sensitivity, you are really asking for trouble when you are a super sensitive celiac/gluten intolerant.

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I was trying to find sweet potato flours for a while, but many of them had soy oil or other additives. Finally did come across a very cheap, relatively easy way to make sweet potato and potato starch AND flour. I'm not sure if the texture will be what you are looking for, but it's cheap enough it might be worth trying out.

http://homeschoolblogger.com/armoorefam/47426/

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There's a brand, J.K. Gourmet that sells almond flour. El Peto is also great if you need grain flours or starches.

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I would work on the grinding it myself if I were you. I sort, wash and then grind. I can understand the texture problems. I finally invested in a good grinder. I think that it is too hard to find clean starting materials, one source of cc and then too hard to make flour without adding more cc in a facility. There are shared facility issues, and cleaning supply issues, and worker sloppiness issues. Then when you have more than one sensitivity, you are really asking for trouble when you are a super sensitive celiac/gluten intolerant.

What kind of grinder do you use? What kinds of flours do you grind?

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What kind of grinder do you use? What kinds of flours do you grind?

I have a hand cranked Country Living Grain Mill.

Caution: when it came it had a sample of wheat inside which they had used to test it. I sent it back and got another, which was still fairly contaminated. It took extensive cleaning.

I have ground corn, millet, sorghum, buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa, garbanzo beans, lentils, rice, I can't remember them all.

What I liked about this mill is that it had an adapter for large things, and it was strong enough to grind popcorn, which a lot are not.

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I have a hand cranked Country Living Grain Mill.

Caution: when it came it had a sample of wheat inside which they had used to test it. I sent it back and got another, which was still fairly contaminated. It took extensive cleaning.

I have ground corn, millet, sorghum, buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa, garbanzo beans, lentils, rice, I can't remember them all.

What I liked about this mill is that it had an adapter for large things, and it was strong enough to grind popcorn, which a lot are not.

Just curious, why do you grind popcorn? Or is that just an example of how strong it is? :)

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I have a hand cranked Country Living Grain Mill.

Caution: when it came it had a sample of wheat inside which they had used to test it. I sent it back and got another, which was still fairly contaminated. It took extensive cleaning.

I recall you mentioning that a while back. I was going to ask: did you get it direct from Country Living or did you get it through a second party site?

I only ask because while looking for mills to buy, I came across a few reviews from people buying through sellers on second party sites that claimed to sell new equipment, but when the customer received the mills, they noticed that some of the burrs were worn or there were other small signs of use or of potentially used parts being replaced.

Wondered if that might have been the issue for you, too, possibly?

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I have a hand cranked Country Living Grain Mill.

Caution: when it came it had a sample of wheat inside which they had used to test it. I sent it back and got another, which was still fairly contaminated. It took extensive cleaning.

I have ground corn, millet, sorghum, buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa, garbanzo beans, lentils, rice, I can't remember them all.

What I liked about this mill is that it had an adapter for large things, and it was strong enough to grind popcorn, which a lot are not.

GAH! Seriously? I wonder if they can test it with something other than wheat. Sounds scary.

Easy to take apart and clean or no?

Do you grind nut flours in it?

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I recall you mentioning that a while back. I was going to ask: did you get it direct from Country Living or did you get it through a second party site?

I only ask because while looking for mills to buy, I came across a few reviews from people buying through sellers on second party sites that claimed to sell new equipment, but when the customer received the mills, they noticed that some of the burrs were worn or there were other small signs of use or of potentially used parts being replaced.

Wondered if that might have been the issue for you, too, possibly?

It was new. I talked to the vendor and they do that to show you how well it works. There is a little sample of the wonderfully fine wheat flour in there.

They sent me a new one and used rice to demonstrate it. I'm guessing it was done in the same facility since it was still contaminated. It was possible to take it apart to clean.

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