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cait

Ugh! Is Anything Safe?

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No, seriously, that's why rice is awesome. It adds texture and volume whilst absorbing the flavour of whatever it is mixed in with. It also adds cheap calories that are not totally empty, like most cheap calories are.

I'm a poor post-college student. I need things like this, which is what wheat pasta used to be for me.

Yes, and for us it's trying to find things that the kids will eat too. They (ages 3 and 5) have rolled with the removal of gluten from their lives (had to make the house gluten-free to keep me from getting CCd all the time), but are still picky young beings. They'll eat rice but won't eat quinoa, and we try not to make separate meals for everyone. Ugh. Feeding everyone was hard enough before all of this.

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Yes, and for us it's trying to find things that the kids will eat too. They (ages 3 and 5) have rolled with the removal of gluten from their lives (had to make the house gluten-free to keep me from getting CCd all the time), but are still picky young beings. They'll eat rice but won't eat quinoa, and we try not to make separate meals for everyone. Ugh. Feeding everyone was hard enough before all of this.

It is difficult feeding everyone and still getting enough nutrition and keeping gluten out. I sympathize with you, hon--as just feeding hubby and me took a year of figuring things out and revamping menus repeatedly as I negotiated various food sensitivities in addition to the celiac, which made me unbelievably sick and in chronic pain. Cooking was the LAST THING I wanted to do and we relied heavily on brown rice as my "go to" food that would not make me sick.

I'm not sure rice is such a "bad guy" :lol: (and I'm with your kiddos--not a fan of quinoa myself. I tried repeatedly...just not my thing, I guess :lol: )

I have read this discussion about rice somewhere--forgive me for not providing a source, but I am sure it is easily verified by some real "foodies" on here. :) Both brown and white rice have thiamin and niacin. White rice is usually enriched with iron and folate, (something celiacs are often deficient in)- although brown rice rarely is.

Brown rice has more magnesium and selenium and more fiber and a lower Glycemic Load which helps blood sugar to stay more stable. Mine was erratic for a few years and now, it is mostly stable.

Brown rice offers some nutritional advantages, but a medium baked potato with the skin has just as much fiber AND more vitamin C, B6, folate, and iron as a cup of brown rice. It also has higher protein, fewer calories and carbohydrates, and a significantly lower glycemic load. A sweet potato is loaded with Vitamin A and C, plus fiber, minerals, and just half the calories and carbohydrates. These two root veggies may be more nutritional, but I do not think rice--which has sustained many cultures for centuries--is necessarily a "bad food". It is USUALLY a hypoallergenic food, but as you will hear from folks on here---it can sometimes be an issue.

If, however, you are reacting to it, well, then...sadly, you should find a substitute--- until you can try reintroducing it later.

Best wishes!

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Yep, sweet taters in the nuker for 10 minutes are easy and cheap. Better for you than rice too. You can use them just like you do white potatoes.

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When I last read, Lundberg and Bob's Red Mill gluten-free products are made in dedicated gluten-free facilities, according to their websites and company statements-- so I am not sure why that would be an issue.

My Doctor said that the protein in oats is very similar to the gluten protein and will cause some celiacs to react to it also. I will have the same migraine from oats that I do from gluten.

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Oh, I love potatoes of all kinds (though I'm supposed to be off the white ones during this phase of the elimination diet). Oddly, though, both kids are anti potato in any form (even fries and chips). I don't have any intense need to eat rice except that it's easy and acceptable to all members of the family (and we do eat brown rice, not white rice). I don't think I have a problem with rice itself, but wondered if the oat contamination that some people have experienced with lundbergs was part of why I felt increasingly rotten after a week of the elimination diet. Because not only were we eating more rice, but I was snacking on their rice cakes (which I usually don't eat) and using their brown rice syrup in a few recipes.

I really wish there were some sort of plug in diagnostic device that would just tell me what I can't eat so I could get on with my life.

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Oh, I love potatoes of all kinds (though I'm supposed to be off the white ones during this phase of the elimination diet). Oddly, though, both kids are anti potato in any form (even fries and chips). I don't have any intense need to eat rice except that it's easy and acceptable to all members of the family (and we do eat brown rice, not white rice). I don't think I have a problem with rice itself, but wondered if the oat contamination that some people have experienced with lundbergs was part of why I felt increasingly rotten after a week of the elimination diet. Because not only were we eating more rice, but I was snacking on their rice cakes (which I usually don't eat) and using their brown rice syrup in a few recipes.

I really wish there were some sort of plug in diagnostic device that would just tell me what I can't eat so I could get on with my life.

I hope you find your answer soon and start to feel better. :)

The only thing I was trying to say earlier when I suggested it would not be an issue (before I knew some people react to oat CC in the BRM products).....isn't Lundberg's solely a RICE company? If so, where exactly would the oats come from that would cause this CC issue? I'm a bit perplexed by that. :unsure:

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I hope you find your answer soon and start to feel better. :)

The only thing I was trying to say earlier when I suggested it would not be an issue (before I knew some people react to oat CC in the BRM products).....isn't Lundberg's solely a RICE company? If so, where exactly would the oats come from that would cause this CC issue? I'm a bit perplexed by that. :unsure:

They use oats as one of their cover crops. I don't know for sure that that's what my problem is. Plenty of people eat their rice and have no problem. But when I saw someone else mention it here it occurred to me that that could be part of why I've felt so lousy this week.

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I don't believe that people are intolerant to rice and other grains. I believe that all of the grains are often cross contaminated and these "intolerances" are mostly just reactions to gluten content.

For instance, people say they're soy intolerant but it just so happens that soy is often the most contaminated of the grains due to farming practices.

There's forums at (Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned) where there are several super sensitives. They test everything they eat and they've found contamination in almost all "gluten-free" labeled processed foods. Then there are foods like distilled vinegars which are supposed to be safe, but a lot of us react to it.

Basically there's a very good chance that you're still getting a lot of gluten. You literally have to go through everything you have and really hunker down and find hidden sources. There are various home testing kits you can use too.

Don't assume any food is inherently safe as there are several foods, like raw poultry, that are sometimes very contaminated - enough to test well over 20ppm. Grains are the worst though. There was a study of the various grains and 14 out of 21 grains were significantly contaminated with gluten with one of the soy flours testing over 3,000ppm.

Supplements are also another big one. They haven't found a single multivitamin that consistently tests negative for gluten. They have even gotten very positive results from rinse aids, spices (ones that are "gluten-free" - McCormick) since they buy their raw product from all over the world and do not test the final product for gluten content.

Even raw produce is sometimes coated with a gluten containing wax.

Some celiacs are not very sensitive and can heal with a pretty good amount of exposure to the stuff, but a large percentage of us don't. Most of us are just told that we have refractory disease, but it's just that we're so sensitive that we react to tons of food due to the massive contamination of our food supply.

So far the only processed rice that is safe is Lundberg, but it's contaminated with oats. Also I had a severe reaction to BRM flours so I wouldn't assume they're safe either, probably oat contamination as well.

If you are still symptomatic then do NOT assume that any of your foods are safe, even if they are labeled gluten free or you are told so by the company. Find products that have been tested and been shown to be safe. Go through your supplements and really find out if they're safe because this is an issue with a lot of people. Products like Centrum and Nature's Made are possibly not safe. These companies literally get raw materials from around the world and combine them into the end product at their plant. There's NO way they can guarantee that the end product is gluten free because there's little to no oversight over the process.

I don't mean to be overbearing I just wish that someone would've given me this information years ago. Hopefully you can get everything figured out. :)

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They use oats as one of their cover crops. I don't know for sure that that's what my problem is. Plenty of people eat their rice and have no problem. But when I saw someone else mention it here it occurred to me that that could be part of why I've felt so lousy this week.

Oats and rice need very different growing conditions so I don't think they would be used as a cover crop. Lundberg does have some mixes that have barley so I think if they are CC'd it is barley CC. I rinse any rice I use very well before cooking and have never had an issue with their products.

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Soy isn't a grain. It's a bean and protein source. There are some of us who are soy intolerant without any doubt. I am one and my reactions to soy are very different from my reactions to gluten. With soy for me there is no DH flare and it binds me for days and flares my arthritis whereas with gluten CC I will have the arthritis flare, D and a GI bleed, vision issues, depression and (now)slight issues with ataxia and a DH flare.

It did however take some time for me to realize that the effects were different and that it was not my reactions being a bit different whenever I got CC'd.

When soy is in a processed product using grains with a company that uses both gluten and nongluten grains then of course there is a possibility of CC.

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I have a soy intolerance as well (I learned that through IgG testing) and my reactions to soy are similar to Ravenwood's. Lately, I have been able to tolerate small amounts of mayo on my sandwich. (yaaay!) And yes, soybean is a legume, not a grain. Why so many celiacs develop a secondary intolerance to soybean has never been explained to me and I cannot find any research on it. I have looked, believe me. Many food intolerances do clear up after the gut is healed. Others do not and some people have to avoid dairy and soy for life.

The reality is, we live in a gluten-filled world. <_<

Wheat and wheat starches, binders and fillers are used in many products. To say that NOTHING is safe is a bit of an overstatement, I believe, and creates a sort of paranoia that makes it worse for people already frightened by the prospect of negotiating a new lifestyle. There are many "celiac myths" and we sometimes have to take a calm look at what is really presenting a problem and what is actually just still inflammation in the GI tract from celiac. I once read that the glue on envelopes had gluten in them and avoided licking them for months. :rolleyes: It's a myth.

In the end, you have to find what works for you.

Here's the rule: when it doubt, throw it out! Try it again later.

You can pay for expensive tests to see what may be a culprit or you can just avoid what food you think may be a problem and see if you feel better.

Unless you are experiencing anaphylactic reactions or wheezing or throat closing--it is not an allergic response to food ---and allergy testing will yield nothing. Many people go this route --only to be disappointed. (me, too!!--my throat closing, difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, facial swelling, red skin, shortness of breath and wheezing -- all celiac-related--anemia and vitamin deficiencies--and thankfully, most of these symptoms have vanished after going gluten-free) There is no playbook to follow for all this, just other people's experiences--and as you can see from this forum--those experiences VARY. Some folks have issues with gluten-free chex, and some do not. Some can use BRM flours and some cannot. And on and on....Everyone is different.

Even after my DX, when I was still very, very ill, NOTHING agreed with me. NOTHING. Even water gagged me. In time, as my inflamed GI tract settled down, foods I thought were a problem (and I ran the gamut...Oh crap!is it eggs? nuts? salicylates? fructose ? pork? beans? cabbage? the air I breathe?? :rolleyes: and on an on) actually were NOT an issue at all...they just were difficult to digest because of the damage that was done and now, they are not.

You can make yourself crazy thinking every food is a problem. I made myself sick with that for a few months, even throwing out what was likely perfectly good food and flours because someone on here said it gave them the big D or C or facial swelling---and because I still had all those symptoms, I figured THAT was it! Poor hubby switched brands of flours 6 times making our bread because we thought--oh, that must be what's still creating issues for me!! (it wasn't--I was just still healing)

The day I read one sentence from a voice of reason on here that said "Sometimes, you still feel lousy because ...you still feel lousy :huh: ... and you are healing"....I stopped fretting about every damn morsel that went inside my mouth. I look at this healing phase now as "It is what it is". I do not like that of course, because I want to be better RIGHT NOW DAMMIT!! :) My doctor said the same thing. It may take 6 -24 months to heal the intestinal lining and you may feel lousy until that happens. That's the reality.

Read labels, eat as plainly as possible and try to relax about it. Chronic stressing over food just makes an already difficult passage all the more traumatic. Eat the gluten-free foods you and your family like best. Avoid too many packaged gluten-free foods at first because they contain many different ingredients and if you feel ill after eating it, it is too difficult to sort out what is the problem. A rule to follow--if there are more than 6 ingredients listed, and some of those words are indecipherable :lol: ....you are diving into muddy waters. Plain, simple foods work best.

Just one humble opinion from someone who has been there/done that.

I wish you well!!

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IrishHeart, your post made me smile as it is such a good summary of my experiences for the last 6 or 7 weeks since my diagnosis, including the list of weird reactions to many foods. In fact it is so good I have printed it off to take with me to the docs tomorrow for my first post-diagnosis follow up. I intended to write up my own notes for the meeting, but am still having difficulty concentrating, so it's a big help. I hope you don't mind!

After 6 weeks or so, I still find (through trial and error) that nothing beats a hearty home-made soup or slow-cooked stew for soothing a sore gut, while getting some much needed nutrition into my body. Everything else is second (or third) best, and many foods are still on the forbidden list for now.

While it is hard to be patient with the slow healing progress, it is better than the stomach pain, fat malabsorbtion, D, headache and fatigue that still results from being too ambitious.

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IrishHeart, your post made me smile as it is such a good summary of my experiences for the last 6 or 7 weeks since my diagnosis, including the list of weird reactions to many foods. In fact it is so good I have printed it off to take with me to the docs tomorrow for my first post-diagnosis follow up. I intended to write up my own notes for the meeting, but am still having difficulty concentrating, so it's a big help. I hope you don't mind!

After 6 weeks or so, I still find (through trial and error) that nothing beats a hearty home-made soup or slow-cooked stew for soothing a sore gut, while getting some much needed nutrition into my body. Everything else is second (or third) best, and many foods are still on the forbidden list for now.

While it is hard to be patient with the slow healing progress, it is better than the stomach pain, fat malabsorbtion, D, headache and fatigue that still results from being too ambitious.

Of course I don't mind :) --I am glad it helped. Gail, you speak wise words. ;) Best to stick to simple, healing foods...slow and steady. The ones that cause the most trouble-- for many-- in the beginning are dairy, soy, acidic foods, beans, and high fat foods. Avoid dairy for as long as possible. Use digestive enzymes if necessary and probiotics.

I, too, was having MAJOR cognitive issues for nearly two years and it scared the hell out of me...This was among dozens and dozens of other symptoms that developed over 4 years and I had to find out what was causing them myself. This THING tried to kill me, seriously :unsure: and I want you to know that the brain fog will diminish in time as well! Honest!

Feel free to PM me if I can be of help. Hang in there, hon! ;) Best wishes to you!

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I have a soy intolerance as well (I learned that through IgG testing) and my reactions to soy are similar to Ravenwood's. Lately, I have been able to tolerate small amounts of mayo on my sandwich. (yaaay!) And yes, soybean is a legume, not a grain. Why so many celiacs develop a secondary intolerance to soybean has never been explained to me and I cannot find any research on it. I have looked, believe me. Many food intolerances do clear up after the gut is healed. Others do not and some people have to avoid dairy and soy for life.

I have been wondering if the problem with soy is that about 95% of the soy available in the US is GMO. It would be interesting what would happen if someone who is soy intolerant would try organic non-GMO soy. However, I'm not volunteering.

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I have been wondering if the problem with soy is that about 95% of the soy available in the US is GMO. It would be interesting what would happen if someone who is soy intolerant would try organic non-GMO soy. However, I'm not volunteering.

:lol: Me Neither!

You raise a good point. If you are intolerant to the SOY PROTEIN, though, it's still going to be an issue, don't you think? I am not sure!

Soy is believed to be disruptive to hormonal balances (thyroid, estrogen) and I do not like the texture of tofu, etc.--- so I do not eat it anyway. (Read The Whole Soy Story if you want to be scared about our food sources in this country...yikes :blink: ) Soybean oil and soy lecithin, however, are used as frequently in packaged/processed products as gluten and therefore, difficult to avoid unless one adopts a totally whole foods diet. And I agree with you that GMO foods are a serious health threat. Some well-respected celiac researchers believe that is what's behind the rapidly growing gluten-intolerant population---because our wheat has been tinkered with for so long. :unsure:

Granted, there is some skepticism surrounding IgG antibody testing for food intolerances and research is ongoing. Medical journals have little information supporting the therapeutic potential of dietary elimination based on the presence of IgG antibodies to food proteins. Yet, MANY people report their successes on this site! :)

The "integrative MD" I saw back in 2010 (when I was very sick and no one could tell me why) did this type of testing and the results showed a severe reaction (i.e. high antibodies) to soybean. He told me to stop eating soy and soy derivatives for 6 months and I would be "right as rain". ...um, nope. Faulty testing?

faulty doctor? I don't know. I continued to go downhill rapidly until I went gluten-free. He failed to diagnose the celiac. He and several others <_< missed the boat.

My humble opinion is that our bodies--ill from long-term consequences of malnutrition from malabsorption--make us prime candidates for various food intolerances --secondary to gluten intolerance. The villi produce enzymes that are essential for digestion, and if the villi are blunted and the mucosal walls of the gut are damaged and leaky, undigested food proteins seep through and circulate in the body, causing inflammation and toxicity. Until that is healed, any food may be a "problem food." That is why people have trouble with dairy (no lactase to digest lactose) or carbs and sugars and fats (insufficient sucrase and maltase) until they heal their guts. Pancreatic enzymes are affected too. Digestion is completely disrupted.

Geesh...listen to me. My anatomy and physiology teacher would be thrilled. :lol: Honestly, I never wanted to know so much about the human body, but researching WHY I was so sick-- losing 90 lbs., my hair, my brain function, and massive muscle mass, and developing chronic, debilitating bone/joint/muscle and burning nerve pain and having my life come to a crashing halt for nearly 4 years -- prompted me to learn about what REALLY happens to the body with celiac disease. And it is pretty extensive.

People who rebound quickly after diagnosis are not the norm, from what I can tell from people's stories on here. <_< I know I am still struggling after 9 months, although many symptoms have resolved. I expect to take a long time, given how long I was demonstrating symptoms and other conditions (35+ years)

I always feel so bad when I read the many daily posts from people as desperate as I was trying various elimination diets (often starving myself) while trying to figure out what was causing so much continued pain and misery. At one point, hubby darkly joked that all that would be left for me to eat was the driveway rocks :blink:

Sometimes, it is simply this: you're sill healing a badly damaged gut.

Patience and time may resolve all these various intolerances because the body may be better equipped to handle those food proteins. I know many celiacs who cannot "do dairy" or the soy or other foods like nightshades--even after many years gluten-free. Why? I do not know. I don't think anyone knows.

I remain hopeful that mine will resolve...because some yummy cheddar cheese or ice cream sure would be nice..... :D

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Oats and rice need very different growing conditions so I don't think they would be used as a cover crop. Lundberg does have some mixes that have barley so I think if they are CC'd it is barley CC. I rinse any rice I use very well before cooking and have never had an issue with their products.

They list it on their website, and others here have mentioned it as well. I don't necessarily know that I DO have a problem with their rice, but was frustrated to see that it was a possibility.

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I have a soy intolerance as well (I learned that through IgG testing) and my reactions to soy are similar to Ravenwood's. Lately, I have been able to tolerate small amounts of mayo on my sandwich. (yaaay!) And yes, soybean is a legume, not a grain. Why so many celiacs develop a secondary intolerance to soybean has never been explained to me and I cannot find any research on it. I have looked, believe me. Many food intolerances do clear up after the gut is healed. Others do not and some people have to avoid dairy and soy for life.

The reality is, we live in a gluten-filled world. <_<

Wheat and wheat starches, binders and fillers are used in many products. To say that NOTHING is safe is a bit of an overstatement, I believe, and creates a sort of paranoia that makes it worse for people already frightened by the prospect of negotiating a new lifestyle. There are many "celiac myths" and we sometimes have to take a calm look at what is really presenting a problem and what is actually just still inflammation in the GI tract from celiac. I once read that the glue on envelopes had gluten in them and avoided licking them for months. :rolleyes: It's a myth.

In the end, you have to find what works for you.

Here's the rule: when it doubt, throw it out! Try it again later.

You can pay for expensive tests to see what may be a culprit or you can just avoid what food you think may be a problem and see if you feel better.

Unless you are experiencing anaphylactic reactions or wheezing or throat closing--it is not an allergic response to food ---and allergy testing will yield nothing. Many people go this route --only to be disappointed. (me, too!!--my throat closing, difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, facial swelling, red skin, shortness of breath and wheezing -- all celiac-related--anemia and vitamin deficiencies--and thankfully, most of these symptoms have vanished after going gluten-free) There is no playbook to follow for all this, just other people's experiences--and as you can see from this forum--those experiences VARY. Some folks have issues with gluten-free chex, and some do not. Some can use BRM flours and some cannot. And on and on....Everyone is different.

Even after my DX, when I was still very, very ill, NOTHING agreed with me. NOTHING. Even water gagged me. In time, as my inflamed GI tract settled down, foods I thought were a problem (and I ran the gamut...Oh crap!is it eggs? nuts? salicylates? fructose ? pork? beans? cabbage? the air I breathe?? :rolleyes: and on an on) actually were NOT an issue at all...they just were difficult to digest because of the damage that was done and now, they are not.

You can make yourself crazy thinking every food is a problem. I made myself sick with that for a few months, even throwing out what was likely perfectly good food and flours because someone on here said it gave them the big D or C or facial swelling---and because I still had all those symptoms, I figured THAT was it! Poor hubby switched brands of flours 6 times making our bread because we thought--oh, that must be what's still creating issues for me!! (it wasn't--I was just still healing)

The day I read one sentence from a voice of reason on here that said "Sometimes, you still feel lousy because ...you still feel lousy :huh: ... and you are healing"....I stopped fretting about every damn morsel that went inside my mouth. I look at this healing phase now as "It is what it is". I do not like that of course, because I want to be better RIGHT NOW DAMMIT!! :) My doctor said the same thing. It may take 6 -24 months to heal the intestinal lining and you may feel lousy until that happens. That's the reality.

Read labels, eat as plainly as possible and try to relax about it. Chronic stressing over food just makes an already difficult passage all the more traumatic. Eat the gluten-free foods you and your family like best. Avoid too many packaged gluten-free foods at first because they contain many different ingredients and if you feel ill after eating it, it is too difficult to sort out what is the problem. A rule to follow--if there are more than 6 ingredients listed, and some of those words are indecipherable :lol: ....you are diving into muddy waters. Plain, simple foods work best.

Just one humble opinion from someone who has been there/done that.

I wish you well!!

I totally agree, and am not trying to spread paranoia or be overly panicked about things. But since, after 5 months gluten-free, I'm experiencing an increase in symptoms it seemed worth trying to figure out if other foods were contributing. I was just frustrated that in the process of trying to simplify and make myself feel better I actually made myself feel worse...

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I totally agree, and am not trying to spread paranoia or be overly panicked about things. But since, after 5 months gluten-free, I'm experiencing an increase in symptoms it seemed worth trying to figure out if other foods were contributing. I was just frustrated that in the process of trying to simplify and make myself feel better I actually made myself feel worse...

Hon, I was not at all suggesting that you, personally, were trying to "spread paranoia" or be overly panicky. Not at all. :)

I am saying that sometimes we become overly fearful because we are not doing as well as we would like and some people's suggestions can be alarming and even misinformed. I know, because I did it myself and learned the hard way. That's all I was trying to say.

I am not sure why you are experiencing an increase in symptoms after 5 months--and you did not mention what those symptoms were--I was only trying to allay some fears. I sincerely hope you find what's causing you discomfort.

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I'm sorry that you are having so many problems. Maybe during a school vacation you will be able to eliminate the 'contamination from your students' variable from the equation and you will be able to figure out what is going on. Before that, I don't know what you can do except to eliminate absolutely all possibilities. There are so many of them if you are a super sensitive, and especially if you add other food intolerances to that.

I am a super sensitive celiac and I had the same problem, except I wasn't a teacher so the glutenings were caused by our shared household, despite how careful the gluten eaters were being.

Keep a careful food journal. Eliminate questionable items and see if you improve. If you aren't sure what to eliminate, try eating more of something and see if it makes you worse.

Be really careful not to get glutened by students. Wash your hands constantly. Don't bring student papers home. Can you grade them at your desk?

Make your home gluten free.

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Steph raises an excellent point---any chance of CC at home??

And like her, I am very sensitive to the slightest amount of accidental gluten, feeling it almost immediately in my brain (like I've been drugged) and then, suffering with SEVERAL symptoms for over a week--insomnia, anxiety, D or c, heart palps, blah blah blah. It was beyond frustrating and discouraging when that happened.

My husband went gluten-free voluntarily (I did not want him to have to do this) after the first 3 months after my DX because he honestly felt it was hindering my progress. And we were VERY careful. One little overlooked source of gluten can wreak havoc.

I feel for you because I truly know the frustration this brings. And as a former teacher, I also know how students "share the germs" :rolleyes: and whatever else they fail to wash off their hands.

Cait, I hope you find what's causing the problem and that you feel better soon.

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Our home is gluten-free. We figured that one out pretty quickly. The kids eat gluten outside of the home sometimes though, so there's always the chance that they're getting me that way, no matter how careful we're trying to be. The larger possibility is my classroom, though. I teach 4 and 5 year olds, and they eat in the classroom. I wash my hands as often as possible, and we do our best to clean up after lunch, but it's pretty much a gluten nightmare. I was hoping doing an elimination diet would help me sort out whether I was reacting to CC at school or other things, but it's pretty impossible to sort out right now. I'll keep on keepin' on and see what happens...

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ooh....Between your own family still being GEs...(gluten eaters :) ) and the little ones you deal with during the day, I fear, chances are you're being inadvertently glutened. :unsure:

Some people report even smooches from little (and big) GEs can cause issues.

I know personally that I get glutened from CC while visiting family--last thanksgiving was a nightmare :blink:--- and I brought my own food!!!!

A friend of mine who does home care work is finding it difficult to prevent accidental CC even though she wears rubber gloves in other people's homes. She finds she has symptoms recur and she is definitely NOT eating gluteny foods herself and her home is gluten-free.

Not sure what you can do except your wash hands frequently and be careful.

Just curious...since you have the genes and your Dad has celiac, were your children tested as well?

In response to your original question, which got lost in our various conversations trying to help, I looked up rice companies for you in the Cecelia's marketplace gluten-free/CF/SF guide I have. Many rices are listed, including Lundberg's ---and they include A Taste of Thai, Albertson's, Arrowhead Mills, Eden Organic, Fantastic World Foods, Fill Circle, Gluten-Free Essentials, Great Value Brand (Walmart's), Hy-Vee Enriched and Boil in Bag, Kraft Minute Rice, Lowes Food Brands, Meijer Brand, Minute Rice, O Organics Long Grain Bronw, Thai and Jasmine, Publix, Safeway, Stop & Shop, Success Boil in Bags Jasmine, Whole Grain Brown --which I use frequently :) --- and White, Thai Kitchen Jasmine, Trader Joe's All Plain Grain Rice Uncle Ben's and Wegman's.

I sincerely doubt the oat CC is an issue, but if you are really worried about it, call the companies and inquire.

Otherwise, my gut instinct tells me your thoughts about CC from people you are in constant contact with may be the real answer.

Best wishes, Cait!

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Thanks! The kids aren't mine biologically, so we're not worried about them and gluten right now. Otherwise, yes, we'd be getting them tested.

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Thanks! The kids aren't mine biologically, so we're not worried about them and gluten right now. Otherwise, yes, we'd be getting them tested.

Sorry, did not mean to pry and hope that was not too personal a question, I was just wondering if they had the genes and/or symptoms, too.

Well, kiddo, it sounds as if you have covered all your bases. Why you are having an increase in symptoms is perplexing, yet it really is an up and down healing path and I wish it would go faster :rolleyes: --for all of us.

Try a different brand of rice in a week or so (rinse it thoroughly) and see if you are okay with it.

Best wishes to you!

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