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Cleaning A Breadmaker?

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I know I have to get a new toaster, but is there any way to clean my breadmaker? I'm gonna be making a lot of my own bread, and those things are expensive. I'd like to be able to use it again.

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Is there any way to buy replacement pieces for the parts that come into contact with the bread? Blade and pan, I guess.

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OK. My recipe book says, "Wash out your breadmaker between baking gluten-free and gluten-full bread." I thought that sounded a little dangerous.

Has anyone out there that lives in a gluten-free and non gluten-free household, actually tried this?

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Are there many places for crumbs to hide? I think most breadmakers are pretty basic- the pan the dough is in with a paddle or two is all that would touch the bread. I'd just soak the pan and blade, scrub the parts really good and maybe put it in the dishwasher. I think you could be able to get all the offending particles out.

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Personally, I would donate it and buy yourself a new one. I know my regular breadmaker has flour and crumbs everywhere in it, not just in the paddle and tin.

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While I wouldn't necessarily recommend it, my friend up the street from me *did* make a gluten free bread for me for ritual in her non-gluten free bread machine. Both of her parents work in food preparation/manufacturing, in the QA dept. so they inspected her work before she started mixing. She also suffers from severe anaphalaxis (sp?), with a lot of things so she is more than aware of how important it is to not cross contaminate. She said she scrubbed everything really well, then stuck it through the dishwasher and then scrubbed it again. Not just the pan and paddle, but the inside of the machine too, (although the machine itself didn't go in the dishwasher obviously) so that nothing would "jump" into the pan while it was kneading.

I safely ate the bread, with no reaction whatsoever, and I'm fairly sensitive, reactions if I do get glutened are quick and quite painful.

Personally, when I went gluten free, I never bothered to use my old gluteny bread machine ever again. I now make it the old fashioned way, in the oven. It's pretty easy, there are a few good recipes in the forums here.

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Kneading bread dough is the most fun part of bread. What is the point of a breadmaker? I never understood them. Making bread from stratch in a bread pan is pretty easy and doesn't take too long, really, unless it has to rise.

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Kneading bread dough is the most fun part of bread. What is the point of a breadmaker? I never understood them. Making bread from stratch in a bread pan is pretty easy and doesn't take too long, really, unless it has to rise.

Generally speaking, gluten-free bread is not kneaded. At least I've never found a recipe that calls for it. Sadly, I am still looking for that *perfect* recipe.

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I cleaned up the breadmaker pan and paddle really well, and made sure the inside of the top of the breadmaker was really clean. (I was worried about old flour falling on my bread.) I didn't worry too much about the bottom of the machine by the heating coil because the bread never touches it. I don't make gluten bread any more so no new flour is going in the machine and I would NOT put gluten flour in it. (Wheat flour simply does not enter my house. Period.)

I haven't had any gluten issues with bread I've made in the machine. Mine doesn't knead gluten-free dough very well though because it tends to be pretty soft and wet so I find I get better bread baking it by hand.

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Mine had some scratches in it (in the non-stick coating part) so we decided to get rid of it.

After last weekend I can say that a "I was diagnosed with celiac" yard sale makes customers feel like they've won the lottery. :)

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"After last weekend I can say that a "I was diagnosed with celiac" yard sale makes customers feel like they've won the lottery."

LOL...yeah I'm thinking I should get rid of it all and tell everyone I just want new kitchen things for Christmas. :)

Ooh a brand new clean kitchen for New Year's, I'm excited already!

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I cannot tolerate any gluten. My husband on the other hand can eat anything he likes. I make my bread and he makes his bread. We share the same bread maker. I have never had a problem. We just wash out the basin as directed by the manufacturer. I hope this helps.

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Generally speaking, gluten-free bread is not kneaded. At least I've never found a recipe that calls for it. Sadly, I am still looking for that *perfect* recipe.

then what's the point of the breadmaker??

I don't get it. seems like such a specialised tool that it's useless.

and I haven't made bread since going gluten-free so I don't know anything about baking gluten free bread. ...

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then what's the point of the breadmaker??

I don't get it. seems like such a specialised tool that it's useless.

and I haven't made bread since going gluten-free so I don't know anything about baking gluten free bread. ...

While I don't have a bread maker, a lot of people do like them (some do have a gluten-free cycle or they can be programmed for just one rise). I debated between it and a KitchenAid stand mixer. I bought the mixer since I thought it would be more versatile...and I don't have room for both.

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My philosophy is that if it is visibly clean then it is safe as long as it is dedicated to gluten free usage. If I go by the max recommended allowable gluten per day, then that can be easily seen. And if some how gluten is hiding in some type of crevice, it is not going to multiply like a bacteria so will only end up being safer with usage. I cleaned my bread maker thoroughly when I made the transition and have had no problem. As always, it is a personal decision.

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OK, it sounds like I could give it a try. I saw that there was a gluten-free section in the cookbook that came with my breadmaker, and I got excited & wanted to try the recipes.

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