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Rachel--24

Enterolab Results...

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I'm really confused about all that.....how is it possible then that some sensitivities "go away" after avoidance of that food for a period of time? I've had ELISA food sensitvity tests done and the explanations that came with my test results stated that foods with "high" reactivity need to be avoided for several years if not forever. Other foods with "low" reactivity can be rotated back into the diet after a few months. How do you know if something is for life or not? What about the gluten....does the fact that I have this gene and + tTg mean that its something different (more serious) than any other sensitivities? I'm soooo lost. :huh:


Rachel

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What does the elisa test use as it marker for detecting food sesitivities. does it use antibody counts like ENTEROLAB. that could explain the difference between a sensitivity and an intolerance. I am just as confused as you are now. I hope somebody can make sense of this.


Debbie

gluten-free since Jan.1,2003

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Hi all -

I don't know a whole lot about this but know that antibodies are a problem when they attack your body by mistake. It could be that the antibodies being tested by EnteroLab are those that attack your body, while Elisa tests and the like find other reactions, not just autoimmune antibodies.

I do know that those found by Enterolab are the kind you want to avoid for life, and not go back on. I think the slow reactions, which I believe (don't sue me!) are the IgG reactions, and they are a different animal than the IgA reactions. And the IgG ones are the ones that can be retested later.

Just know there are many kinds of reactions to foods, etc, and they are not all the same so don't all follow the same rules. :) (uh, just like people!)

Stephanie


Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04

Gluten-free since 10/04

Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)

Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07

Fibromyalgia, 6/11

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I do know that those found by Enterolab are the kind you want to avoid for life, and not go back on. I think the slow reactions, which I believe (don't sue me!) are the IgG reactions, and they are a different animal than the IgA reactions. And the IgG ones are the ones that can be retested later.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Stephanie...How do you know all this stuff? :blink:

I saw a doctor today (a decent doctor for once). She gave me an explanation about all this and I was gonna explain it....but you already did :D

It's exactly like you said....there is a big difference between IgA reactions and IgG reactions. The ELISA test that I took was for IgG antibodies. ;)


Rachel

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antigliadin and anti tissue transglutaminase are the ones that enterolab tests for at least with the gluten and then the others it say anti-casein iga or anti-ovulbumin(which is for egg white) So waht does that mean. so are these the inlorance antibodies? are they worse than the others or not. Still confused.


Debbie

gluten-free since Jan.1,2003

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antigliadin and anti tissue transglutaminase are the ones that enterolab tests for at least with the gluten and then the others it say anti-casein iga or anti-ovulbumin(which is for egg white) So waht does that mean.  so are these the inlorance antibodies? are they worse than the others or not. Still confused.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

From what I understand....they are worse than the IgG antibodies I was talking about...which are usually temporary and the foods can be reintroduced after healing. I think with IgA intolerances...the problem may always be there....the same as gluten. Glueten intolerance is stronger because of the gentic factor involved. This is how my doc explained it.


Rachel

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From what I understand....they are worse than the IgG antibodies I was talking about...which are usually temporary and the foods can be reintroduced after healing. I think with IgA intolerances...the problem may always be there....the same as gluten. Glueten intolerance is stronger because of the gentic factor involved. This is how my doc explained it.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

antigliandin antibodies come in both IgA and IgG "flavors". if I recall correctly, the tTg test is also checking on an IgG antibody. (IgA and IgG are the "classes" of antibody, while anti-gliandin, tissue transglutimerase, anti-reticulin, and so forth are specific "models")


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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Rachel - I don't know how I know all this stuff, just soak it up, I guess. I was uncertain when I was typing my response so I'm happy to learn that I got it right.

You'll find you know more than your docs and nutritionists in no time, trust me. Pretty funny, we should all be doctors by default!

Stephanie


Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04

Gluten-free since 10/04

Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)

Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07

Fibromyalgia, 6/11

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