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alicewa

Is Oat Sensitivity A Hla-Dq2 Thing?

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What's the difference between subtypes 2.5, 2.2 and 2.3 for the hla-dq gene and which resembles intolerance to oats. My doctor told me it's likely to be dq2.2

I haven't been tested for genes yet but just really was curious. :unsure:

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As far as I know, there haven't been any studies on celiac genetics and intolerance to oats. It's probably because there are relatively few oat-sensitive celiacs to study. Perhaps your doctor has noticed something clinically.

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Just for informational purposes (because I have no idea if it means anything), I'm DQ2 and oat sensitive.

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I had read somewhere it is also that within the oats that are grown in a gluten free manner, avoiding being grown in old wheatfields and harvested on the same equipment, for example, there are still varieties that provoke reactions more than others, but I apologize for not being able to remember where I read this.

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I don't know my genetics and I am very gluten free oat sensitive. I don't allow my youngest son to eat oats either. I'm not certain of his sensitivity now, but as a baby he would get a bad rash on his head anytime he or I ate oats. I don't think my oldest son is oat sensitive, but he doesn't eat anything with them in. He has tolerated oat contaminated gluten free products fine where I don't.

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I had read somewhere it is also that within the oats that are grown in a gluten free manner, avoiding being grown in old wheatfields and harvested on the same equipment, for example, there are still varieties that provoke reactions more than others, but I apologize for not being able to remember where I read this.

I think I saw that somewhere too, that some strains oats are more celiac-friendly than others. I'm a little too busy to try and figure out where I read it.

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Yes, that is one of the articles, everybody should bookmark that one.

Here is the paper it was based on:

BMJ, GUT journal

Diversity in oat potential immunogenicity: basis for the selection of oat varieties with no toxicity in coeliac disease

http://gut.bmj.com/content/early/2011/02/11/gut.2010.225268.short?rss=1

Results Three groups of oat cultivars reacting differently against moAb G12 could be distinguished: a group with considerable affinity, a group showing slight reactivity and a third with no detectable reactivity. The immunogenicity of the three types of oats as well as that of a positive and negative control was determined with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear T cells from patients with celiac disease by measurement of cell proliferation and interferon γ release. A direct correlation of the reactivity with G12 and the immunogenicity of the different prolamins was observed.

Conclusions The results showed that the reactivity of the moAb G12 is proportional to the potential immunotoxicity of the cereal cultivar. These differences may explain the different clinical responses observed in patients suffering from celiac disease and open up a means to identify immunologically safe oat cultivars, which could be used to enrich a gluten-free diet.

Glad the Europeans are looking at this, explains a lot of random oat reactions. Of course, here across the pond, the American regulatory body is still contemplating whether to even have labeling standards for gluten, oats might cause another 7 years of deep contemplating. <_<

I laugh when I see the registered dieticians always trying to insist the oats are safe and should be a part of the gluten free diet..... well, maybe, maybe not.

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Thanks, Takala! I got it in my bibliography this time.

They keep trying to put oats in the celiac diet because "grains are good for you." Grains are overrated.

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