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CourtneyLee

Hydrolysed Wheat?

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So, I've been eating original rice crackers by the brand fantastic. The incredients has in it, soy sauce powder [contains soy, hydrolysed wheat (gluten free)]. How can something that contains wheat be gluten free?


courtney xo

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Perhaps they are allowed to do that because they test below a certain level, I don't know for sure but do know for sure that I wouldn't eat them.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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So, I've been eating original rice crackers by the brand fantastic. The incredients has in it, soy sauce powder [contains soy, hydrolysed wheat (gluten free)]. How can something that contains wheat be gluten free?

I too have started avoided anything like this. At first ( a few months ) thought that the kitchen - bathroom "gluten free" might be okay but the longer I'm avoiding it the more I discover the "gluten-free" but wheat derived isn't helping. So many products (esp bathroom) have some crazy latin-science language that doesn't resemble "gluten" that I now avoid anything that looks, smells, feels gluten-free unless it comes from a gluten-free factory. I test products from a production line / manufacturer once. If I'm not sure about the consequences I take it off my unwritten 'list'. I have an problem ( 4 months gluten-free with companies that stock gluten containing and then see on the gluten-free shelf)I have converted to cooking a lot more at home as much as I dislike washing dishes :blink:

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It's not gluten free. The manufacturer is using a dodge, claiming that the processing is rendering it gluten free, but it isn't. Same way that some of the Europeans use highly modified "codex" wheat starch in their gluten free goods, then they have a lot of people reacting, and wonder why the percentage of celiacs who respond to the diet isn't perfect.

wiki on what is hydrolyzed vegetable protein

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid-hydrolyzed_vegetable_protein

Acid-hydrolyzed vegetable protein, or HVP,[1] is produced by boiling cereals or legumes, such as soy, corn, or wheat, in hydrochloric acid and then neutralizing the solution with sodium hydroxide. The acid hydrolyzes, or breaks down, the protein in vegetables into their component amino acids. The resulting dark coloured liquid contains, among other vegetable based amino acids, glutamic acid. It is used as a flavor enhancer in many foods.

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I was using cosmetics that used wheat germ oil where the gluten was supposed to be removed. Fine til 2 months or so gluten-free, then my eyes started swelling.

No more.....


Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.

Hashimoto's DX 2005.

Gluten-Free since 6/2011.

DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND.

Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

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So, I've been eating original rice crackers by the brand fantastic. The incredients has in it, soy sauce powder [contains soy, hydrolysed wheat (gluten free)]. How can something that contains wheat be gluten free?

If you get the right mix of bacteria, hydrolyzed wheat can have the gluten broken down to where it's below 20ppm, and sometimes below the level of detection entirely.

I am concerned about traces of gluten in foods like that and it's not hard to find rice crackers without anything derived from wheat. I would find another brand.

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