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Austin Guy

Soy, Corn And Rice Question

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I diagnosed myself as gluten intolerant in May and have been gluten free, aside from accidental cc, since then. However, I am now sensitive to soy, corn and rice. Soy gets me almost as badly as gluten, but corn and rice just induce tremendous fatigue (makes for a good sleep aid) and cause my pulse and blood pressure to increase. My thinking is that symptoms of other food sensitivities were masked by the glutening symptoms and I finally recognized them after going gluten free. Is this a leaky gut thing and might I regain the ability to eat some of these sometime in the future after enough of the intestinal lining has healed? If not, why is a person sensitive to gluten also sensitive to other foods? Similar protein structure?

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I have similar sensitivities, namely to dairy, soy, nightshades and corn. Usually leave me tired for a day or two on their own. Hoping over time they will resolve but I recall something I read earlier stating that your GI tract has, essentially, a brain of it's own, which due to the gluten reaction will over time identify other foods it thinks are causing the problems often leading to a variety of intolerances.

Let me know if you find out more and specifically something more concrete as this topic interests me.

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You've listed a bunch of foods with lectins, and the nightshades you also have in your signature have a lot of lectins and other food chemicals. "Leaky gut" can let lectins that shouldn't be in your bloodstream across. I also get that fatigue you're describing from starchy foods and I'm figuring out it's a combination of insulin reaction, and feeding too much starch to yeast in my gut (that shouldn't be there).

Yes, you may regain the ability to eat more foods but it can take more than avoiding gluten to heal your gut. I'm working with the GAPS diet right now to try to shift my bacterial balance, since I noticed a lot of my recent issues started after a course of antibiotics.

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You've listed a bunch of foods with lectins, and the nightshades you also have in your signature have a lot of lectins and other food chemicals. "Leaky gut" can let lectins that shouldn't be in your bloodstream across. I also get that fatigue you're describing from starchy foods and I'm figuring out it's a combination of insulin reaction, and feeding too much starch to yeast in my gut (that shouldn't be there).

Yes, you may regain the ability to eat more foods but it can take more than avoiding gluten to heal your gut. I'm working with the GAPS diet right now to try to shift my bacterial balance, since I noticed a lot of my recent issues started after a course of antibiotics.

Skylark, just reading your post and thought something I did a while ago might be of help. Before diagnosing gluten issues I looked at a load of other things that I thought might be what was causing my issues. I looked at thyroid, leaky gut, CFS (an associated treatments) etc etc. One of the things I looked at was candida and took a course of threelac for a month or two. Before I started a gluten-free diet, it was the only thing that made a difference and my gut feels so much healthier after the course. Don't know if that would be of help or whether you've tried it but I thought I'd at least bring it up incase it was of any use.

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You've listed a bunch of foods with lectins, and the nightshades you also have in your signature have a lot of lectins and other food chemicals. "Leaky gut" can let lectins that shouldn't be in your bloodstream across. I also get that fatigue you're describing from starchy foods and I'm figuring out it's a combination of insulin reaction, and feeding too much starch to yeast in my gut (that shouldn't be there).

Yes, you may regain the ability to eat more foods but it can take more than avoiding gluten to heal your gut. I'm working with the GAPS diet right now to try to shift my bacterial balance, since I noticed a lot of my recent issues started after a course of antibiotics.

Skylark, I was diagnosed with celiac 21 months ago. As time has gone by, I keep adding to the list of things I have become intolerant to. Lactose, after 6 months, soy, 5 months after that and just now potatoes, 7 months later, When will this stop? I have been on a fruit, veggies, tree nuts, meat and egg diet for over 2 weeks now and have returned to as normal as I have ever been. Just today I ate potato to test for a reaction and 2 hours later, I have the rumbly tummy, cramps and diarrhea.

When I get over this upset I intend to try corn, tapioca, sorghum and white rice. I went on this elimination diet because I thought rice had become a problem, but I decided to test all starches.

What are nightshades? What are lectins? What is the GAPS diet? Is this ever going to stop?

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Skylark, just reading your post and thought something I did a while ago might be of help. Before diagnosing gluten issues I looked at a load of other things that I thought might be what was causing my issues. I looked at thyroid, leaky gut, CFS (an associated treatments) etc etc. One of the things I looked at was candida and took a course of threelac for a month or two. Before I started a gluten-free diet, it was the only thing that made a difference and my gut feels so much healthier after the course. Don't know if that would be of help or whether you've tried it but I thought I'd at least bring it up incase it was of any use.

Threelac is fabulous! I'm taking it now along with Bio-Kult. I did two months of Threelac after the antibiotics and it helped a little, but I'm still having a LOT of thyroid autoimmunity problems. All the work at Alvine and recent work on Type 1 diabetes is suggesting that leaky gut plays a strong role in autoimmunity.

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Skylark, I was diagnosed with celiac 21 months ago. As time has gone by, I keep adding to the list of things I have become intolerant to. Lactose, after 6 months, soy, 5 months after that and just now potatoes, 7 months later, When will this stop? I have been on a fruit, veggies, tree nuts, meat and egg diet for over 2 weeks now and have returned to as normal as I have ever been. Just today I ate potato to test for a reaction and 2 hours later, I have the rumbly tummy, cramps and diarrhea.

When I get over this upset I intend to try corn, tapioca, sorghum and white rice. I went on this elimination diet because I thought rice had become a problem, but I decided to test all starches.

What are nightshades? What are lectins? What is the GAPS diet? Is this ever going to stop?

GAPS diet is here. http://gapsdiet.com/ You do have to buy the book, but it's well worth the cost. It explains what's going on and why the gluten-free diet isn't enough to heal. Why you keep getting more and more intolerances. Why you get sick from sugar and starches. Why your nervous system doesn't work right either, and you get depression and anxiety.

Nightshades are the plant family including potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, hot peppers, and sweet peppers. They make a lot of drug-like molecules called alkaloids that can trigger inflammation. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins in legumes, seeds, nuts, and nightshade foods, many of which are toxic. For example, the poisons in uncooked kidney beans and castor beans are lectins. A lot of people are intolerant to them for unclear reasons. Sprouting, cooking, or fermenting foods often gets rid of the lectins, which is one of many reasons sprouted beans and grains are easier to digest. If you want to learn more about lectins, track down the poster named Mushroom. She's very lectin intolerant and a bit of an expert.

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Look into rice that has absolutely no additives. In other words, avoid uncle ben's and minute rice. Try something like this: http://www.truroots.com/p.aspx?cont=Products&id=4

I was in a similar predicament after my celiac diagnosis. While I still know I cannot eat soy, I tend to believe that my inability to eat corn is due to gastritis (maybe that is another name for leaky gut). And I discovered that I can eat plain rice but never rice that has been treated with vitamins or any additives like your usual store bought brands. Good luck to you / its really difficult to find carbs when you have to cut rice and corn.

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Another vote for the GAPS book, here. I have a bunch of blogs posted about it as well (see the link on my profile). We thought nightshades were an issue and took introducing them slowly and now they seem to be fine. We introduced them about 5 months into GAPS, I think.

GAPS starts out totally grain free for a couple years, then allows slow introduction of those foods.

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GAPS diet is here. http://gapsdiet.com/ You do have to buy the book, but it's well worth the cost. It explains what's going on and why the gluten-free diet isn't enough to heal. Why you keep getting more and more intolerances. Why you get sick from sugar and starches. Why your nervous system doesn't work right either, and you get depression and anxiety.

Nightshades are the plant family including potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, hot peppers, and sweet peppers. They make a lot of drug-like molecules called alkaloids that can trigger inflammation. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins in legumes, seeds, nuts, and nightshade foods, many of which are toxic. For example, the poisons in uncooked kidney beans and castor beans are lectins. A lot of people are intolerant to them for unclear reasons. Sprouting, cooking, or fermenting foods often gets rid of the lectins, which is one of many reasons sprouted beans and grains are easier to digest. If you want to learn more about lectins, track down the poster named Mushroom. She's very lectin intolerant and a bit of an expert.

Interesting, will check out this GAPS diet, one thing I noticed, nightshades seem to be ok for me when I'm clear of gluten for 2 weeks. I wonder if cortisol masks the symptoms to a large extent, I guess it probably does as this would explain why we can drink alcohol, smoke tobacco/drugs without feeling like s$#&. Obviously with reduced cortisol, which is what I speculate to be the case with a lot of folk here and with other chronic diseases (particularly those that involve constant inflammation, e.g. crohns), you are not guarded by the effects of cortisol and therefore subject to the full effects of the toxicity.

What I'm getting at is say I feel better tomorrow and can eat these foods, would I still choose to with the nagging thought in the back of my mind that these foods are toxic, even if in the grand scale of things perhaps not hugely so.

Hmm...some food for thought, sorry about the pun :), couldn't resist

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Must be the lectins, which I was not aware of before this post. Thanks for the info.

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