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Experience With Nylabone Pet Products?

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Hi! I recently got a puppy and the food she was already on from the breeder is gluten free so there's no worries there. The store we buy our food from says they only carry gluten free pet foods. I bought her a Nylabone because the packing states in multiple places that it is gluten free. However, on the ingredients list on the back of the package the first ingredient listed is "wheat starch." What gives? I am afraid to give it to her because I don't want to get sick from cross contamination. How can they say its gluten free if it has wheat starch in it?

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Beats me. You might write the company and ask.

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The question pivots around the definition of gluten. Gluten is a part of the protein found in certain grains. Starch is a different part of the grain. In theory, starch is gluten-free. In practice, it is likely to be contaminated with bits of protein. In the European Union, products containing "wheat starch" may be labeled "gluten-free" if they contain less than 20 parts per million gluten. Twenty parts per million is 0.0002 per cent.

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Thanks for the reply. I'm still waiting on a reply from the company. I guess I can try giving it to her and see if I get sick. Or maybe I'll just play it safe and return it!

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Thanks for the reply. I'm still waiting on a reply from the company. I guess I can try giving it to her and see if I get sick. Or maybe I'll just play it safe and return it!

I would return it and look for something without wheat. It took some searching but I finally found a good bone for my power chewer that is nylon and rice based. I am sorry I don't remember the name but the bone has a bright blue with nubbies center and that's surrounded by a white bone shape. I need to get another as she really gets upset (literally walks around searching and whining) if she can't find it. When I go to the store this week I will try to remember to come back and tell you the brand name.

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I saw these too. The "gluten free formula" caught my attention. I didn't buy them. I'll be curious to hear what you find out.

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We stick with Kongs.

My dog literally destroys anything else...in two minutes.

They were selling antlers (as chew bones) at the pet store. Thought about it and couldn't get Bambi out of my mind....

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They were selling antlers (as chew bones) at the pet store. Thought about it and couldn't get Bambi out of my mind....

In my store, we sell deer antler chews. No animals are harmed, as male deer grow a new set every fall, and shed them in the spring. They are found in the forest by trained dogs. Elk are a member of the deer family, and they, too, shed their antlers annually.

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In my store, we sell deer antler chews. No animals are harmed, as male deer grow a new set every fall, and shed them in the spring. They are found in the forest by trained dogs. Elk are a member of the deer family, and they, too, shed their antlers annually.

Thanks for the info. The sales girl knew nothing about how they came to be found...

I bet SuperMoose will enjoy one. Maybe I'll put one in his stocking :).

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-ravenwoodglass- definitely let me know if you remember that none you use! I love to give her something to chew on be sides my hands lol

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I received an email today from the company and this is what they said -

Hi Nikki - Nylabone

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99.9% gluten-free? That's not gluten-free at all. That's 1000 ppm gluten. If I were you, I'd write back to Nylabone, complain, and return them to the store!

We really need laws about gluten-free labeling in this country.

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99.9% gluten-free? That's not gluten-free at all. That's 1000 ppm gluten. If I were you, I'd write back to Nylabone, complain, and return them to the store!

We really need laws about gluten-free labeling in this country.

I also would return it. There are really gluten free chew toys around. There are hard rubber, some you can even hide treats or pnut butter in, and also ones made of hanks of string that are knotted and more.

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Best dog treat - raw femur bones. They love them and they help clean their teeth.

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Would I get those at the butcher? I think that's what my mom used to give our dogs when I was growing up.

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Let me clarify something. The OP is talking about an edible dog treat. That is not human food, and legally is considered "animal feed." Animal feed is regulated primarily by AAFCO. There are major differences in the rules for animal feed compared to human food.

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Let me clarify something. The OP is talking about an edible dog treat. That is not human food, and legally is considered "animal feed." Animal feed is regulated primarily by AAFCO. There are major differences in the rules for animal feed compared to human food.

Regulation isn't really the issue. As far as I'm aware, dogs don't get celiac to begin with. They arguably shouldn't be eating grains in the first place. The only reason to label animal food gluten-free is for the owner. Nylabone probably thinks of it as a clever marketing ploy and hasn't the foggiest idea that there are people with celiac disease who will get ill from a dog that licked them after eating food with 0.1% gluten. If there IS such a thing as canine celiac, that food would have far too much gluten in it to give the animal any relief.

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Actually, dogs can, and do, get celiac disease - as defined by antibody response and intestinal damage. Not all that common, of course, and I agree that dogs shouldn't really be eating grains anyway.

That said, "gluten free" is a big marketing ploy in the pet food world, these days, because glutens are/were often used as fillers. So, "gluten free" does NOT mean "no wheat or other gluten containing grains" in dog foods. It means no gluten (as an ingredient) was added (usually for a cheap protein source) to the recipe, but it may well still contain whole barley, for instance.

This is one reason why regulation IS an issue - our human food regulation doesn't apply to dog food, and it's important to know that if you have a pet and are trying to avoid gluten contamination from them (which is, I agree, a good thing to do!).

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Would I get those at the butcher? I think that's what my mom used to give our dogs when I was growing up.

The butcher, any serviced butcher department in a grocery store ought to be able to help you. (I generally have gotten mine at Whole Foods. The knuckle bones are popular too, but they can get "eaten" through and you have to be careful about how much your dogs eats of it. And no bone should ever be left with a dog who is home alone, ever!

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Actually, dogs can, and do, get celiac disease - as defined by antibody response and intestinal damage. Not all that common, of course, and I agree that dogs shouldn't really be eating grains anyway.

Yea my vet said they can also. It is quite common in Irish Setters but can also affect many other breeds.

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Yea my vet said they can also. It is quite common in Irish Setters but can also affect many other breeds.

Wild. I had no idea dogs could get celiac.

So, dogs can get celiac and they are a creature that really shouldn't eat grains in the first place. Does that extend to humans? Are we not really supposed to be eating grains?

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Wild. I had no idea dogs could get celiac.

So, dogs can get celiac and they are a creature that really shouldn't eat grains in the first place. Does that extend to humans? Are we not really supposed to be eating grains?

Make ya wonder doesn't it? With so many modern grain products fortified I also wonder how much nutrition they really have other than as carbs. How desperate to fill their bellies were the first folks who thought to try grinding some up and cooking it? I know my pets seem to do best on a grain free diet.

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Make ya wonder doesn't it? With so many modern grain products fortified I also wonder how much nutrition they really have other than as carbs. How desperate to fill their bellies were the first folks who thought to try grinding some up and cooking it? I know my pets seem to do best on a grain free diet.

If you want interesting reading try some stuff about food plants of the Sonoran desert. Not a lot of grasses (for obvious reasons) but its extremely interesting reading nutritionally, especially in the context of modern health problems in native populations.

Talk about efficient machinery - I mean the bodies and digestive/nutritional system of Native Americans of the Sonoran desert.

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Regulation isn't really the issue. As far as I'm aware, dogs don't get celiac to begin with. They arguably shouldn't be eating grains in the first place. The only reason to label animal food gluten-free is for the owner. Nylabone probably thinks of it as a clever marketing ploy and hasn't the foggiest idea that there are people with celiac disease who will get ill from a dog that licked them after eating food with 0.1% gluten. If there IS such a thing as canine celiac, that food would have far too much gluten in it to give the animal any relief.

Considering that you have to ingest wheat to cause a reaction, a Celiac would have to feed their dog wheat, then have the dog lick them and somehow would put the licked body part in their mouths?????????? :blink: This is how a reaction would happen unless you have a topical allergy, which I could totally understand to be a problem. You people really worry about this?

I have owned dogs for the vast majority of my life and have never, ever had any type of Celiac reaction from a dog. I am about a sensitive as a Celiac can be, take mucho precaution with everything I do but do not worry about or have ever gotten sick from anything dog related. Nylabone is a hard product...not powdered like flour. I mean, unless you are sharing your dogs Nylabone treat, I really can't fathom anyone would have a true Celiac reaction from this. I've been doing this diet for almost 7 years so am pretty well versed in it. I might buy into the dog food issue if there is a lot of dust which billows up when pouring it into the bowl or a storage bin but Nylabone? Good grief!

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Skylark you clearly haven't used Nylabone products before or at least not the bone I am referring to. It is covered in a BBQ flavored coating which is what I was worried about so no, i dont have plans on chewing on my dogs bone. If you are truly such a sensitive celiac (as I am) then you should have some experience gettig sick from some pretty odd circumstances ad I would think you'd be a little more understanding. I've gotten extremely ill from mascara that had wheat starch in it! And no, i dont eat my macara purposefully but when you are a sensitive celiac you realize just how many things make their way into our digestive systems. So I'm trying to be as careful as I an be to prevent contamination because getting glutened SUCKS. Puppies lick EVERYTHING and my hands are so dry from constant washing that thu are literally cracking. I am vigilant but still can't see purposefully exposing myself to something that could make me sick if there are better alternatives. I'm nt sure why you would bother to post such a negative and judgmental response?!

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