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ScarlettsMommy

Just Diagnosed And Feel Like Its The End Of The World!

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For 2 years after giving birth via csection I have been sick to my stomach on and off for 2 years. I was diagnosed with Crohns disease and today after tons of tests and biopsies the dr has confirmed I also have Celiac. I dont know where to start and I feel like my world is ending now that I cannot have gluten. My favorite foods are cheesesteaks, pizza, french fries with gravy, chinese food, etc. Now that I cant have them, I dont know how I will go on. Food is everything to me. I am very passionate about food. I just want to scream and am now envious of everybody in my household that can eat what they want. I am angry and need help dealing with this!!

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I am very passionate about food. I just want to scream and am now envious of everybody in my household that can eat what they want. I am angry and need help dealing with this!!

Keep in mind that you may not be the only one in your household that may have an issue with gluten..

BTW, You may not have Crohns Disease....

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Keep in mind that you may not be the only one in your household that may have an issue with gluten..

BTW, You may not have Crohns Disease....

Well my brother has Crohns disease really bad as does my cousin. I have fissures and mouth ulcers and the colonoscopy with biopsies that confirmed crohns. The biopsies from my small instestine and bloodwork confirmed celiac. But yea I will have to let my family know so they can get tested

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For 2 years after giving birth via csection I have been sick to my stomach on and off for 2 years. I was diagnosed with Crohns disease and today after tons of tests and biopsies the dr has confirmed I also have Celiac. I dont know where to start and I feel like my world is ending now that I cannot have gluten. My favorite foods are cheesesteaks, pizza, french fries with gravy, chinese food, etc. Now that I cant have them, I dont know how I will go on. Food is everything to me. I am very passionate about food. I just want to scream and am now envious of everybody in my household that can eat what they want. I am angry and need help dealing with this!!

I know you are frustrated....I think we've all been there at one point or another after being diagnosed. You will find that you will still be able to have most anything you want. You will just have to use gluten free products and I have to say that most of them are just as good if not better. I make the bobs red mill gluten free pizza mix and bake it on a pizza stone (after I initially bake it on a pan to get it firm) and my kids and husband like it better than theirs with gluten. I also found that I can make just about any cake recipe with gluten-free plain flour & it comes out wonderful.

Hang in there & try to stay positive.....

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For 2 years after giving birth via csection I have been sick to my stomach on and off for 2 years. I was diagnosed with Crohns disease and today after tons of tests and biopsies the dr has confirmed I also have Celiac. I dont know where to start and I feel like my world is ending now that I cannot have gluten. My favorite foods are cheesesteaks, pizza, french fries with gravy, chinese food, etc. Now that I cant have them, I dont know how I will go on. Food is everything to me. I am very passionate about food. I just want to scream and am now envious of everybody in my household that can eat what they want. I am angry and need help dealing with this!!

Big changes are hard, and you need to give yourself the space to grieve this loss (of not just a food, but a habit and way of thinking). Anger is normal. Almost everyone here has gone through the same thing, and it will take time, and support, and patience, to get through it to a better place. There are a lot of helpful people around here who can offer all kinds of great advice on some things that helped them through the transition.

This part is a bit less sympathetic, though. I don't say it to be mean, but rather to really urge you to clearly look at your thoughts. You have a two year old - food cannot be more to you than your two year old. She needs a healthy mom to help her grow and learn. How do you go on when you can't have cheesesteak, pizza, french fries with gravy, or chinese food? By eating other foods. By finding new foods that you like. By making all those same things you love but gluten free. (Seriously, there is none of that which you'll never eat again. You won't have a wheat based pizza crust for your pizza, but that is not what defines a pizza.) There is little to nothing that one cannot adapt to - if you're willing to just try.

It's totally fair to scream, to be angry, and to be jealous! But stick around the board, and read from the thousands of folks who have been in your shoes and have learned how to make adaptations that worked for them. You will figure out how to do it, and you will - with some effort - figure out the mental perspective that will make it easier. But this will all take time. But you have at least one really, really good reason to do so.

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For 2 years after giving birth via csection I have been sick to my stomach on and off for 2 years. I was diagnosed with Crohns disease and today after tons of tests and biopsies the dr has confirmed I also have Celiac. I dont know where to start and I feel like my world is ending now that I cannot have gluten. My favorite foods are cheesesteaks, pizza, french fries with gravy, chinese food, etc. Now that I cant have them, I dont know how I will go on. Food is everything to me. I am very passionate about food. I just want to scream and am now envious of everybody in my household that can eat what they want. I am angry and need help dealing with this!!

I have had Celiac Disease for 2 years now and can feel your pain. About 4 years ago I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and thought my world was over! Then came CELIAC DISEASE..........wow..talk about a life changer! I just really dove into my own research about the disease and have found lots of good things to eat and lots of good information to keep me on top of my gluten free diet. It's really not so bad. I figure it's a miracle to have a disease with such an easy cure.......NO GLUTEN....and I feel better! WOW! I guess I imagine it could've been alot worse so I'm lucky!! :)

I recommend researching any food that you regularly eat by calling the manufacturer. I have found some of my favorites that don't list any gluten actually come in contact with gluten in the making. I do get a stomach ache so I had to give them up and find a new favorite!

You can still have cheesesteaks, pizza, french fries with gravy (holy cholesterol) and even chinese food with gluten free soy sauce!

Keep your mind open to some healthier options too! You may just start too feel healthier than you ever dreamed!

It gets better,

Celiac Julie

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I understand your frustration. Most seem to go through several phases: I went through shock (I was not sick), then anger followed by grief. That was eight months ago. At that time I did not think I would ever be able to say this but it is not nearly as difficult as it was. I find it easy to be gluten free at home. Eating out is different except for the high-end places where the chefs are trained and highly aware of celiac disease.

As others have said, you can still have most things. I know, gluten-free bread will NEVER be the same as gluten bread. It is not possible. Pizzas are not quite the same but many of us here make pretty mean dough you can actually roll out (as opposed to spreading it like some recipes). I still make my own Chinese food (very easy to do gluten-free) as well as Thai, German, Hungarian, Syrian, Turkish, Greek, Italian, British, Croatian, Vietnamese...it goes on and on. In fact, you will find so many dishes are naturally gluten free anyway or are extremely easy to make gluten free.

After my first gluten-free bread experience I was so bewildered I did not have bread again for ages. I would recommend you trying Udi's or Glutino's Genius bread. They truly are the best commercial bread out there and are good for sandwiches, etc. I know it's not the same. I get it. But do not think of it as a substitute - think of it as a new food group. Same with gluten-free doughnuts, rolls and so on.

Sometimes the gluten-free diet forces people to become more adventurous and creative cooks. For some fabulous ideas do some snooping around the Recipes threads.

Give yourself time. It sounds trite and empty but it really is true - things DO improve with time. I promise. :D Just think of how much better you will feel. This diagnosis could have saved your life. That is how I look at it because I was asymptomatic and had a hard time going gluten free because I was not motivated to do so. My diagnosis forced me to evaluate my health in every facet. I am taking far better care of myself than ever before, eating extremely well but a very balanced diet with a lot of whole foods and I almost never buy any commercial snacks. There are some really yummy things to make that are FAR better, anyway.

Hang in there! We are here to empathize with you and encourage you.

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The person that said you don't have Crohns is wrong I believe. In this case at least. I just read an article, 18.6 % of Crohns patients have Celiacs. And the vast majority of non-celiacs crohns patients find a big relief gluten free. Not the end of the world. One day at a time. One day at a time. One day at a time. Thats how I'm feeling right now. B)

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The person that said you don't have Crohns is wrong I believe. In this case at least. I just read an article, 18.6 % of Crohns patients have Celiacs. And the vast majority of non-celiacs crohns patients find a big relief gluten free. Not the end of the world. One day at a time. One day at a time. One day at a time. Thats how I'm feeling right now. B)

Booghead, Can you name the person that said, ""You don't have Crohns?""

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I've had Ulcerative colitis for 12 years and the symptoms have progressively worsened. I decided to go to a nutritionist and three weeks ago I went gluten-free. When the nutritionist told me that I would have to give up everything that I loved (bread, bagles with cream cheese, pizza, CUPCAKES, and the list goes on) I was overwhelmed. I became obsessed over food and did not know what I would be able to eat. I do not have an overly adventurous palate and all three meals were wheat based. It took me a week to re-organize my life and 10 days to get rid of terrible withdrawal symptoms (I looked like a junkie in detox) and now I feel better than ever. It is the first time in years that I do not have any pains in my stomach, my back has flexibility, my mood has improved and most importantly I can sleep throughout the night. Once you start feeling better, you will never look back. And it is much easier than it originally seems. I must say though that my nutritionist wanted me to go off dairy products and I drew the line there. I cannot give up my lattes.

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It's totally fair to scream, to be angry, and to be jealous! But stick around the board, and read from the thousands of folks who have been in your shoes and have learned how to make adaptations that worked for them. You will figure out how to do it, and you will - with some effort - figure out the mental perspective that will make it easier. But this will all take time. But you have at least one really, really good reason to do so.

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All I can offer you is hugs. I've been gluten free since March and still am angry and pissed and upset and grieving. The diet has upset my life in such a way that I've had to try Prozac in order to cope. But it made me dead inside, so I had to stop. I hope you have better luck than I. Most people on the board adjust well to the diet and actually see benefits in their physical health. I might be the only person who hasn't. So, sending you hugs and best wishes.

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All I can offer you is hugs. I've been gluten free since March and still am angry and pissed and upset and grieving. The diet has upset my life in such a way that I've had to try Prozac in order to cope. But it made me dead inside, so I had to stop. I hope you have better luck than I. Most people on the board adjust well to the diet and actually see benefits in their physical health. I might be the only person who hasn't. So, sending you hugs and best wishes.

I have only seen tiny improvements in my health (i.e. strong tooth enamel, strong fingernails) as well so I can understand. I have been gluten free almost exactly the same length of time as you! But I did not feel ill from gluten to begin with. However, I sure do wish my chronic pain and insomnia would hurry up and improve!

But I am one of those who, after the first two months, has adjusted well. It is so engrained in me that I honestly do not think about it much (other than when I eat out). Even TV commercials used to annoy me - I often said, "I can't have that. Oh, I can't have that, either." Now it is far different. I do not really notice them any more. But as I have mentioned about 10,000 times (sorry, all) I am so smitten with cooking and experimenting that it is so much fun. It would be far more difficult if I was not passionate about it. Plus it is easier for me as it is only my husband and I - we do not have children so it is easy to keep free from gluten in our home.

I have also made a conscious decision not to allow celiac disease to control me. It does not. I control it. That itself is very freeing.

Hopefully you will soon notice improvements. It has been a long road for you, I know, but please keep keeping on!

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Give it time and it will get easier. I've been on the diet for 2 years now and other than croissants and phyllo dough there is nothing I cannot find a suitable replacement for.

Udi's and Rudi's both have really good bread. Udi's makes a fantastic pizza crust. I made a bbq chicken pizza for dinner last night and it was delicious! There are so many good brands of gluten free pasta. I make spaghetti and lasagna regularly. I'm able to make wonderful cakes, cookies, and brownies. In fact the food is so good that my husband and daughter willing eat gluten free at home and seem to feel no deprivation!

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One of the most accurate statements that I have ever read about Celiac Disease is that it is a socially isolating disease. It is when so many social or family functions revolve around food. Especially at this time of year. And as everyone here has said, we have all experienced what you are going through with the anger and grief so I understand that this a particularly hard time to learn that you have this disease.

What I have come to learn in the past four years is that gluten problems are becoming more of a commonly known issue to restaurants, to manufacturers, and to the public in general. Most grocery stores that you go into will have a gluten free section (in addition to the many many naturally gluten free options.) Some major chains even have PDF lists of their gluten-free items on line for you to download before shopping. It's come to the point that it is very hard not to pick up a paper or magazine that does not discuss the gluten free issue. When people find out you have Celiac, someone in the group will probably know someone else who has it too. (We are multiplying like zombies out here!;-") While many doctors still remain clueless when diagnosing stomach problems, JQ Public has gotten on board and is learning that we are a viable market for their goods.

It is important to remember that you are not alone and that this is a 'livable' disease. No blood transfusions, no amputations. It only requires a positive mindset and acceptance that your life is changing. It changed when you had your baby and you had to adapt. It is amazing what the people interred in the concentration camps during world war two came to accept because it was what they were forced to live. Bad analogy to a horrific tragedy and I hope that I am not offending people, but true that we all have the beautiful capacity to adapt to our cirmcumstances.

In my experience, you will find it all much easier when you stop thinking about 'what you can't have' and begin by recognizing what you CAN have. I made the Thanksgiving pies this year with crust that tasted better than I had ever made before. In my family I was formerly know as the PIE MAKER and asked to make the pies for any family function. I gave it up for a few years thinking that I could never duplicate the flaky crusts without using toxic flour, but now I wear the crusty, crumbly crown again. You will find your own successes and you will enjoy your life again. One positive is that since this a an inherited disease, your daughter's chances of having it are good. In the plan of destiny(God) your learning of this now makes her life that much healthier and easier to accept since she is too little to ever remember what toxic-gluteny bread and pizza tastes like.

I look forward to hearing good things from you in the future. Good luck to you. You will find a lot of comfort and answers from the kind people here. I did and still do.

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Thank you for all of your kind words. The hardest part is even though im 24 and married with a child, tough economic times are forcing us to live with my parents temporarily. Cooking for just myself, with all the tempation around me, and watching everyone eat my favorite foods in front of me makes me upset. When my mom says "Lets just order a pizza" I have to accept that I can no longer have it and watch everyone else eat it and force myself to make something else. My husband is in full support, and when we do get our own place again, he said he is fine with having only gluten free in the house, and if he feels he must have mcdonalds or something he will do it on his own time and not around me. But again, thank you everyone.

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Thank you for all of your kind words. The hardest part is even though im 24 and married with a child, tough economic times are forcing us to live with my parents temporarily. Cooking for just myself, with all the tempation around me, and watching everyone eat my favorite foods in front of me makes me upset. When my mom says "Lets just order a pizza" I have to accept that I can no longer have it and watch everyone else eat it and force myself to make something else. My husband is in full support, and when we do get our own place again, he said he is fine with having only gluten free in the house, and if he feels he must have mcdonalds or something he will do it on his own time and not around me. But again, thank you everyone.

Do you live in a larger community? There are several pizza places in our community, which is mid-sized, that carry gluten-free pizza. Also, your larger store chains have some pre-cooked gluten-free meals in their freezer section. Amy's is a brand that comes to mind. Do you have a Trader Joe's, Whole Foods, or Costco nearby? They also have a great supply of gluten-free pre-made foods. Also, if time permits, you could spend part of a day making food for yourself that you could portion out into single portions and freeze.

I know it's an adjustment for the family to make too but if they realize that it makes you sick, wouldn't they want to support you. You may have to work a little harder to educate them. If you present it to them with the mindset that it is hereditary and you need to make sure to feed the baby gluten-free to make sure she doesn't have problems, they might fall in line.....

I went to visit my father in AZ a few months ago. I believe that I inherited the Celiac curse (hee hee) from his side of the family. Most of his side of the family also suffers from stomach issues although none have been tested, but they all know that I have it. They had a huge bar-b-que so that everyone could get together and all of these people, most whom I have met only once or twice in my life, made an effort to make food that I could eat. I did get zapped that night, but did not have the heart after all of their effort, to tell them it's not just what's in it but how and where it's prepared that makes it safe. Funny thing is, because I knew they were coming, a lot of what I made for them was toxic stuff to me. Just a point that people will commit to supporting you if you show them that you are committed to being safe and you educate them about what you need.

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Unfortunately my family (except for my husband) refuses to eat gluten free and they are telling me its not their problem and I cant hold them back =0( So im all on my own until I get my own place. But yes there is a Trader Joes and Whole Foods that is a 45 min drive away but I guess it will be worth it!! Horrible thing is i never cooked before so this will be a challenge!!

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Unfortunately my family (except for my husband) refuses to eat gluten free and they are telling me its not their problem and I cant hold them back =0( So im all on my own until I get my own place. But yes there is a Trader Joes and Whole Foods that is a 45 min drive away but I guess it will be worth it!! Horrible thing is i never cooked before so this will be a challenge!!

You may find some good buys @ Supper Walmart too....

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I know how you feel. I'm just intolerant (well maybe coeliac because my doctor googled the condition and said 'i think this is the right test to run'.... *facepalm*) but all my favourite foods are laden with gluten. Even my favourite chip flavour is almost IMPOSSIBLE to find gluten-free (is salt and vinegar really that hard?? I've gone through so many bottles of vinegar by pouring it on hot chips in my withdrawal). It's been almost a year for me. When I am craving it all big time I make lists of the foods I would love to have. It sounds silly but I suppose there is the possibility that I will one day have to do another gluten challenge so I've got my list.

I'm in Australia and we have quite a few pizza places that do gluten free bases. I know Dominos here do, as well as Eagle Boys, but that is an Australian chain. I actually got a free pizza from dominios because I sent them an email telling them how appreciative I am of the gluten free pizza.

I'm not so sure about chinese food because we haven't had it for such a long time but almost all thai and indian food seems to be gluten free. If you have issues with dairy, indian can be a little difficult though.

You might also be surprised by the stuff you can still have. There are also yummy things you can make that are gluten free normally. An example is Pavlova, though I'm not sure people make them in the USA. They are absolutely delicious and quite easy to make. My mother has become the queen of pavlova in the past year with me gluten free. I've been living in college this year and on a few occassions have baked brownies and cupcakes and I've offered them to people and they really enjoy them. I then mention they are gluten free and they're always so surprised!!

For my first month or so I stuck to very natural htings. Grilled chicken, salad, roast vegies, steaks etc. It was a little bland but after a week or two I began to appreciate the tastes alot more than I ever had before. Once I went back on the gluten and dairy to test and knew I had issues I began to look more at what was available in the health food aisle. Even now I still prefer just eating naturally. It is also heaps cheaper and healthier. I'm not sure about in the USA but in Australia 'gluten-free' things seem to be quite a bit fattier.

It's not the end of the world and it can be frustrating at times, especially when you're out and about and want to grab some takeaway or when a yummy looking burger is on tv but once you start to feel better those moments where you want to have something glutenny will come less often. Or at least they have for me. At the moment, however, I am on a detox for other health reasons and it is the first time in almost a year that I have really wanted a piece of bread. I JUST WANT SOME PROTEIN!! haha

Good luck getting started!!

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I know how you feel. I'm just intolerant (well maybe coeliac because my doctor googled the condition and said 'i think this is the right test to run'.... *facepalm*) but all my favourite foods are laden with gluten. Even my favourite chip flavour is almost IMPOSSIBLE to find gluten-free (is salt and vinegar really that hard?? I've gone through so many bottles of vinegar by pouring it on hot chips in my withdrawal). It's been almost a year for me. When I am craving it all big time I make lists of the foods I would love to have. It sounds silly but I suppose there is the possibility that I will one day have to do another gluten challenge so I've got my list.

I'm in Australia and we have quite a few pizza places that do gluten free bases. I know Dominos here do, as well as Eagle Boys, but that is an Australian chain. I actually got a free pizza from dominios because I sent them an email telling them how appreciative I am of the gluten free pizza.

I'm not so sure about chinese food because we haven't had it for such a long time but almost all thai and indian food seems to be gluten free. If you have issues with dairy, indian can be a little difficult though.

You might also be surprised by the stuff you can still have. There are also yummy things you can make that are gluten free normally. An example is Pavlova, though I'm not sure people make them in the USA. They are absolutely delicious and quite easy to make. My mother has become the queen of pavlova in the past year with me gluten free. I've been living in college this year and on a few occassions have baked brownies and cupcakes and I've offered them to people and they really enjoy them. I then mention they are gluten free and they're always so surprised!!

For my first month or so I stuck to very natural htings. Grilled chicken, salad, roast vegies, steaks etc. It was a little bland but after a week or two I began to appreciate the tastes alot more than I ever had before. Once I went back on the gluten and dairy to test and knew I had issues I began to look more at what was available in the health food aisle. Even now I still prefer just eating naturally. It is also heaps cheaper and healthier. I'm not sure about in the USA but in Australia 'gluten-free' things seem to be quite a bit fattier.

It's not the end of the world and it can be frustrating at times, especially when you're out and about and want to grab some takeaway or when a yummy looking burger is on tv but once you start to feel better those moments where you want to have something glutenny will come less often. Or at least they have for me. At the moment, however, I am on a detox for other health reasons and it is the first time in almost a year that I have really wanted a piece of bread. I JUST WANT SOME PROTEIN!! haha

Good luck getting started!!

Dandt,

I don't know if they carry them in Australia but Kettle brand chips have an amazing vinegar and salt flavor, among other yummy offerings. Also, if you have Lays potato chips there, check to see if they offer Vinegar and Salt. Many of their chips are gluten-free as well.

Scarlett's Mommy;

I am sorry that you are not getting more support from home. That makes your problem doubly hard. If there is a PF Changs or Hu Hot near you, they are very gluten-free friendly. Hu Hot will even let you pick your stuff from a fresh supply of veggies,meats and sauces that have not yet been put out for the public to cross contaminate. I have had really good experiences there. Be careful to ask for fresh rice with a clean spoon because I think I got zapped once by not doing so.

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You need to learn to use 'teh google' to help you find what you need.

Google "gluten free" in front of anything and it comes up. So "gluten free name of your town health food store" should pull up a search of nearby health food stores, where you may get better deals than at TJ's and WF's, anyway.

The first thing you ought to get is a few staple items of things that you actually like to eat, such as frozen gluten free pizza crusts or boxed mixes, or even a rice or a gluten free corn tortilla will do in a pinch. Then at a regular grocery you can get plain tomato paste or gluten free spaghetti sauce, olive oil, and cheese. Hormel makes gluten free pepperoni. Put the toppings on the pizza shell with some oregano and basil (McCormick's single spices are okay, watch out for spice mixtures from other brands) and put it on a clean pan (if using non stick, it is now your brand new dedicated to gluten-free non stick, which you just purchased for your gluten free use, otherwise, use a well scrubbed one) and bake your own pizza.

You should also, as soon as possible, mail order a basic gluten free cooking primer type book, which will teach you how to use basic items, some of which can be found in a regular grocery, and end up with something gluten free. You can also start here in the baking and cooking section, and there are LOTS of blogs with people writing about the tricks of gluten free cooking, which consists of becoming obsessive about reading labels, using clean work surfaces and utensils, and discovering that many recipes for bread and cake don't actually use the amount of liquid called for - it's either a little more, or a little less. :rolleyes:

The thing with gluten free cooking is that glutenoid people will frequently eat it if they 1) don't know it is specifically made to be that way and 2) it tastes halfway decent. It is Christmas season, do you want a cookie made with real butter, honey and real almonds, or do want one of those disgusting store - bought pieces of styrofoam loaded with artificial ingredients, that sort of thing. Do people really care that the cookie might have potato starch in it ? No, chances are they are eating it too fast to notice, anyway. Do people really notice that it is whole grain rice pasta and not wheat pasta if the sauce is good enough ? Yes, the texture is a little different, but chances are, if they weren't told, they'd scarf it down anyway as long as it was cooked properly, rinsed in the colander to stop cooking and remove the sticky starch, then re salted and olive oiled. Will the World Come To An End if it's a Chebe gluten-free breadstick with the spaghetti ? Not likely.

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I am still new to gluten free as well but here is a few things that may help:

I was just thinking the other day how I would like to make a philly cheesesteak on a Udi's toasted hot dog bun. I havent tried it yet, but I think it would be really yummy.

I LOVE pizza and was really sad about pizza at first. Other than not having the ease of popping in somewhere and ordering a pizza, I do not miss pizza AT ALL. I personally love Udi's frozen pizza crust and so does my gluten eating husband. I also like the Chebe pizza crust.

After gluten free, I have had A LOT less cravings for carbs. I am really convinced that the gluten makes you crave gluten. My cravings for any foods have gone down so much. I still think certain foods sound really good and want to cook/buy them. However, I tend to choose foods based on my hunger and nutriention requirements now.

Like someone else said, it really helped me to focus on what I CAN have and not what I can't have. If someone has something that looks good, make it a challenge to yourself to figure out how to make that.

As far as cooking, I've been cooking for awhile now, but I have noticed that I have greatly expanded my cooking skills. I am more fearless in cooking things now. There have been things in the past that I was scared to try to cook, because I felt as though I had to live up to a certain standard (mom, grandma, etc). Now, I think if it doesn't turn out, it doesn't turn out. I will figure something else out.

Always keep something on hand to eat. Fruit, nuts, Lara bars. you never know when you will be hungry and unable to get something gluten free.

Good luck. I hope it makes you feel better soon!

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I am still new to gluten free as well but here is a few things that may help:

I was just thinking the other day how I would like to make a philly cheesesteak on a Udi's toasted hot dog bun. I havent tried it yet, but I think it would be really yummy.

I LOVE pizza and was really sad about pizza at first. Other than not having the ease of popping in somewhere and ordering a pizza, I do not miss pizza AT ALL. I personally love Udi's frozen pizza crust and so does my gluten eating husband. I also like the Chebe pizza crust.quote]

I love Udi's pizza crusts! They are so versatile. In the midwest we have something called a runza. Cooked cabbage, ground beef, onions and spices wrapped in bread dough and baked. They are wonderful but there is no gluten-free bread dough that really does very well with this mixture. One day I became inspired and layered the mixture with swiss cheese, mushrooms and the Udi's pizza crusts and baked it in the oven like a german lazagna. It was amazing. Because the crusts are crisp, they hold up well and tasted great. My family loved it. You could do exactly the same thing with philly cheesesteak filling. I plan to try it soon. Sounds wonderful.

Another tip, SM, is that if there is a product you question as to whether it has gluten in it, you can type the brand name with + gluten following it a something will usually come up to let you know whether it is safe or not.

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Another tip, SM, is that if there is a product you question as to whether it has gluten in it, you can type the brand name with + gluten following it a something will usually come up to let you know whether it is safe or not.

I do that all the time. I seriously would struggle at the supermarket some days without my iphone! I usually just type in "is productname gluten free" and I get the answer straight away. Probably not the best way, but I'm usually checking ingredients.

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